Results for 'embryo'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Frozen Embryos and The Obligation to Adopt.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Nicholas Colgrove - 2020 - Bioethics (8):1-5.
    Rob Lovering has developed an interesting new critique of views that regard embryos as equally valuable as other human beings: the moral argument for frozen human embryo adoption. The argument is aimed at those who believe that the death of a frozen embryo is a very bad thing, and Lovering concludes that some who hold this view ought to prevent one of these deaths by adopting and gestating a frozen embryo. Contra Lovering, we show that there are (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  2. Embryo Loss and Double Effect.Ezio Di Nucci - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):537-540.
    I defend the argument that if embryo loss in stem cell research is morally problematic, then embryo loss in in vivo conception is similarly morally problematic. According to a recent challenge to this argument, we can distinguish between in vivo embryo loss and the in vitro embryo loss of stem cell research by appealing to the doctrine of double effect. I argue that this challenge fails to show that in vivo embryo loss is a mere (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  3.  7
    Embryo Experimentation: Is There a Case for Moving Beyond the ‘14-Day Rule’.Grant Castelyn - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 38 (2):181-196.
    Recent scientific advances have indicated that it may be technically feasible to sustain human embryos in vitro beyond 14 days. Research beyond this stage is currently restricted by a guideline known as the 14-day rule. Since the advances in embryo culturing there have been calls to extend the current limit. Much of the current debate concerning an extension has regarded the 14-day rule as a political compromise and has, therefore, focused on policy concerns rather than assessing the philosophical foundations (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  4. Killing Embryos for Stem Cell Research.Jeff Mcmahan - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):170–189.
    The main objection to human embryonic stem cell research is that it involves killing human embryos, which are essentially beings of the same sort that you and I are. This objection presupposes that we once existed as early embryos and that we had the same moral status then that we have now. This essay challenges both those presuppositions, but focuses primarily on the first. I argue first that these presuppositions are incompatible with widely accepted beliefs about both assisted conception and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  5.  54
    Donating Embryos to Stem Cell Research: The “Problem” of Gratitude.Jackie Leach Scully, Erica Haimes, Anika Mitzkat, Rouven Porz & Christoph Rehmann-Sutter - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):19-28.
    This paper is based on linked qualitative studies of the donation of human embryos to stem cell research carried out in the United Kingdom, Switzerland, and China. All three studies used semi-structured interview protocols to allow an in-depth examination of donors’ and non-donors’ rationales for their donation decisions, with the aim of gaining information on contextual and other factors that play a role in donor decisions and identifying how these relate to factors that are more usually included in evaluations made (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  6.  45
    Human Embryo Research and the Language of Moral Uncertainty.William P. Cheshire - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):1 – 5.
    In bioethics as in the sciences, enormous discussions often concern the very small. Central to public debate over emerging reproductive and regenerative biotechnologies is the question of the moral status of the human embryo. Because news media have played a prominent role in framing the vocabulary of the debate, this study surveyed the use of language reporting on human embryo research in news articles spanning a two-year period. Terminology that devalued moral status - for example, the descriptors things, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  7. The Embryo Rescue Case.S. Matthew Liao - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (2):141-147.
    In the debate regarding the moral status of human embryos, the Embryo Rescue Case has been used to suggest that embryos are not rightholders. This case is premised on the idea that in a situation where one has a choice between saving some number of embryos or a child, it seems wrong to save the embryos and not the child. If so, it seems that embryos cannot be rightholders. In this paper, I argue that the Embryo Rescue Case (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  8.  78
    Creating Embryos for Use in Stem Cell Research.Dan W. Brock - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):229-237.
    In this paper I will address whether the restriction on the creation of human embryos solely for the purpose of research in which they will be used and destroyed in the creation of human stem cell lines is ethically justified. Of course, a cynical but perhaps accurate reading of the new Obama policy is that leaving this restriction in place was done for political, not ethical, reasons, in light of the apparent public opposition to creating embryos for use in this (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  9. Reproductive Embryo Editing: Attending to Justice.Inmaculada de Melo-Martin - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
    The use of genome embryo editing tools in reproduction is often touted as a way to ensure the birth of healthy and genetically related children. Many would agree that this is a worthy goal. The purpose of this paper is to argue that, if we are concerned with justice, accepting such goal as morally appropriate commits one to rejecting the development of embryo editing for reproductive purposes. This is so because safer and more effective means exist that can (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  23
    If Embryos and Fetuses Have Rights.Michele GoodwIn - 2017 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 11 (2):189-224.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  11. Why the Embryo Rescue Case is a Bad Argument Against Embryonic Personhood.Perry Hendricks - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (6):669-673.
    The “Embryo Rescue Case” (ERC) refers to a thought experiment that is used to argue against the view that embryos have a right to life (i.e. are persons). I will argue that cognitive science undermines the intuition elicited by the ERC; I will show that whether or not embryos have a right to life, our mental tools will make it very difficult to believe that embryos have said right. This suggests that the intuition elicited by the ERC is not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12.  40
    Embryos and Pseudoembryos: Parthenotes, Reprogrammed Oocytes and Headless Clones.H. Watt - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (9):554-556.
    What makes something an embryo—as opposed to what is actually, and not just in biotech parlance, a collection of cells? This question has come to the fore in recent years with proposals for producing embryonic stem cells for research. While some of those opposed to use of standard embryonic stem cells emphasise that adult cells have a clinical track record, others argue that there may be further benefits obtainable from cells very like those of embryos, provided such cells can (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13.  23
    Creating Embryos for Use in Stem Cell Research.Dan W. Brock - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):229-237.
    The intense and extensive debate over human embryonic stem cell research has focused primarily on the moral status of the human embryo. Some commentators assign full moral status of normal adult human beings to the embryo from the moment of its conception. At the other extreme are those who believe that a human embryo has no significant moral status at the time it is used and destroyed in stem cell research. And in between are many intermediate positions (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  14.  39
    Embryo Donation in Iran: An Ethical Review.Leila Afshar & Alireza Bagheri - 2013 - Developing World Bioethics 13 (3):119-124.
    Iran is the only Muslim country that has legislation on embryo donation, adopted in 2003. With an estimated 10–15% of couples in the country that are infertile, there are not any legal or religious barriers that prohibit an infertile couple from taking advantage of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ARTs). Although all forms of ARTs available in Iran have been legitimized by religious authorities, there is a lack of legislation in all ARTs except embryo donation. By highlighting ethical issues in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  15.  60
    Embryo Stem Cell Research: Ten Years of Controversy.John A. Robertson - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):191-203.
    This overview of 10 years of stem cell controversy reviews the moral conflict that has made ESCs so controversial and how this conflict plays itself out in the legal realm, focusing on the constitutional status of efforts to ban ESC research or ESC-derived therapies. It provides a history of the federal funding debate from the Carter to the Obama administrations, and the importance of the Raab memo in authorizing federal funding for research with privately derived ESCs despite the Dickey-Wicker ban (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  16. Do Embryos Have Interests?: Why Embryos Are Identical to Future Persons but Not Harmed by Death.Aaron Simmons - 2012 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (1):57-66.
    Are embryos deserving of moral consideration in our actions? A standard view suggests that embryos are considerable only if they have interests. One argument for embryonic interests contends that embryos are harmed by death because they are deprived of valuable future lives as adult persons. Some have challenged this argument on the grounds that embryos aren’t identical to adults: either due to the potential for embryos to twin or because we do not exist until the fetus develops consciousness. These arguments (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17. Embryo Experimentation.Peter Singer, Helga Kuhse, Stephen Buckle, Karen Dawson & Pascal Kasimba (eds.) - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    New developments in reproductive technology have made headlines since the birth of the world's first in vitro fertilization baby in 1978. But is embryo experimentation ethically acceptable? What is the moral status of the early human embryo? And how should a democratic society deal with so controversial an issue, where conflicting views are based on differing religious and philosophical positions? These controversial questions are the subject of this book, which, as a current compendium of ideas and arguments on (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  18.  29
    Debate: Embryo Research The Ethics of Embryo Research.Peter Singer & Helga Kuhse - 1986 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 14 (3-4):133-138.
  19. Human Embryo Genetic Editing: Hope or Pipe Dream?Inmaculada de Melo-Martin & Zev Rosenwaks - 2021 - Fertility and Sterility 116 (1):25-26.
    Ethically sound analyses of embryo genetic editing require more than simple assessments of safety considerations. After all, we as humans care deeply not only about our health, but also care profoundly about the kinds of societies we construct, the injustices that our actions produce, the responsibilities that we have toward others and ourselves, our self-understanding, the characters that we develop, our family relationships, and the world that we leave to our children and grandchildren.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Abortion, Embryo Destruction and the Future of Value Argument.J. Savulescu - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (3):133-135.
    Abortion and embryo destruction prevent a future of value, but that does not make them wrong.Abortion involves the killing of a fetus. One bad thing about killing a fetus is that the fetus is deprived of a future of value. Think of all the things which make your life good and worth living: understanding the world, seeing your children grow into independent, intelligent, and happy people, watching a sunset over the hills, enjoying good times with friends. By killing the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  21.  23
    The Embryo Project: An Integrated Approach to History, Practices, and Social Contexts of Embryo Research. [REVIEW]Jane Maienschein & Manfred D. Laubichler - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (1):1 - 16.
    This essay describes the approach and early results of the collaborative Embryo Project and its on-line encyclopedia. The project is based on a relational database that allows federated searches and inclusion of multiple types of objects targeted for multiple user groups. The emphasis is on the history and varied contexts of developmental biology, focusing on people, places, institutions, techniques, literature, images, and other aspects of study of embryos. This essay introduces the ways of working as well as the long-term (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  22. The Embryo in Ancient Rabbinic Literature: Between Religious Law and Didactic Narratives: An Interpretive Essay.Etienne Lepicard - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (1):21-41.
    At a time when bioethical issues are at the top of public and political agendas, there is a renewed interest in representations of the embryo in various religious traditions. One of the major traditions that have contributed to Western representations of the embryo is the Jewish tradition. This tradition poses some difficulties that may deter scholars, but also presents some invaluable advantages. These derive from two components, the search for limits and narrativity, both of which are directly connected (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23.  19
    Vulnerable Embryos: A Critical Analysis of Twinning, Rescue, and Natural-Loss Arguments.Stephen Napier - 2010 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):781-810.
    Contemporary philosophical discussion on human embryonic stem cell research has focused primarily on the metaphysical and meta-ethical issues suchresearch raises. Though these discussions are interesting, largely ignored are arguments rooted in the secular research ethics tradition already informing humansubject research. This tradition countenances the notion of vulnerability and that vulnerable human subjects ought to be protected from research-related harms. This is the basic idea behind the argument from vulnerability, and it enjoys prima facie plausibility. This articlepresents the vulnerability argument and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  24.  18
    Embryo Politics: Ethics and Policy in Atlantic Democracies.Thomas F. Banchoff - 2011 - Cornell University Press.
    The emergence of ethical controversy -- First embryo research regimes -- The ethics of embryonic stem cell research -- Stem cell and cloning politics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  1
    Staging Embryos: Pregnancy, Temporality and the History of the Carnegie Stages of Embryo Development.Sara DiCaglio - 2017 - Body and Society 23 (2):3-24.
    The founding of the Carnegie Institute’s Department of Embryology in 1913, alongside its systematization of embryo staging, contributed to the mechanization of developmental stages of embryo growth in the early 20th century. For a brief period in the middle of the century, attention to the detailed interrelation between embryo development and time made pre-existing ideas about pregnancy ends less determinative of ideas about that developmental course. However, the turn to the genetic scale led to the disappearance of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  26.  14
    Animating Embryos: The in Toto Representation of Life.Janina Wellmann - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Science 50 (3):521-535.
    With the recent advent of systems biology, developmental biology is taking a new turn. Attempts to create a ‘digital embryo’ are prominent among systems approaches. At the heart of these systems-based endeavours, variously described as ‘in vivoimaging’, ‘live imaging’ or ‘in totorepresentation’, are visualization techniques that allow researchers to image whole, live embryos at cellular resolution over time. Ultimately, the aim of the visualizations is to build a computer model of embryogenesis. This article examines the role of such visualization (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27.  42
    Embryo Deaths in Reproduction and Embryo Research: A Reply to Murphy's Double Effect Argument.Katrien Devolder - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):533-536.
    The majority of embryos created in natural reproduction die spontaneously within a few weeks of conception. Some have argued that, therefore, if one believes the embryo is a person (in the normative sense) one should find ‘natural’ reproduction morally problematic. An extension of this argument holds that, if one accepts embryo deaths in natural reproduction, consistency requires that one also accepts embryo deaths that occur in (i) assisted reproduction via in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and (ii) embryo (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  28.  14
    Google Embryo for Building Quantitative Understanding of an Embryo As It Builds Itself. II. Progress Toward an Embryo Surface Microscope.Richard Gordon - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (4):396-412.
    Embryos start out as tiny globes, on which many important events occur, including cell divisions, shape changes and changes of neighbors, waves of contraction and expansion, motion of cell sheets, extension of filopodia, shearing of cell connections, and differentiation and morphogenesis of tissues such as skin and brain. I propose to build a robotic microscope that would enable a new way to look at embryos: Google Embryo. This is akin to sending a space probe to Jupiter and its moons, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29.  24
    Embryo Research: The Ethical Geography of the Debate.G. Khushf - 1997 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 22 (5):495-519.
    Three basic political positions on embryo research will be identified as libertarian, conservative, and social-democratic. The Human Embryo Research Panel will be regarded as an expression of the social-democratic position. A taxonomy of the ethical issues addressed by the Panel will then be developed at the juncture of political and ethical modes of reflection. Among the arguments considered will be those for the separability of the abortion and embryo research debates; arguments against the possibility of the preembryo (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  30.  59
    Embryos and Eagles: Symbolic Value in Research and Reproduction.Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris - 2006 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (1):22-34.
    On both sides of the debate on the use of embryos in stem cell research, and in reproductive technologies more generally, rhetoric and symbolic images have been evoked to influence public opinion. Human embryos themselves are described as either “very small human beings” or “small clusters of cells.” The intentions behind the use of these phrases are clear. One description suggests that embryos are already members of our community and share with us a right to life or at least respectful (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  70
    Embryos, The Principle of Proportionality, and the Shaky Ground of Moral Respect.Jonathan Pugh - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (8):420-426.
    The debate concerning the moral permissibility of using human embryos in human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research has long centred on the question of the embryo's supposed right to life. However, in focussing only on this question, many opponents to hESC research have escaped rigorous scrutiny by making vague and unfounded appeals to the concept of moral respect in order to justify their opposition to certain hESC practices. In this paper, I offer a critical analysis of the concept of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  42
    Embryo Stem Cell Research: Ten Years of Controversy.John A. Robertson - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):191-203.
    Embryonic stem cell research has been a source of ethical, legal, and social controversy since the first successful culturing of human ESCs in the laboratory in 1998. The controversy has slowed the pace of stem cell science and shaped many aspects of its subsequent development. This paper assesses the main issues that have bedeviled stem cell progress and identifies the ethical fault lines that are likely to continue.The time is appropriate for such an assessment because the field is poised for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  33. The Ambiguity of the Embryo: Ethical Inconsistency in the Human Embryonic Stem Cell Debate.Katrien Devolder & John Harris - 2007 - Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):153–169.
    We argue in this essay that (1) the embryo is an irredeemably ambiguous entity and its ambiguity casts serious doubt on the arguments claiming its full protection or, at least, its protection against its use as a means fo research, (2) those who claim the embryo should be protected as "one of us" are committed to a position even they do not uphold in their practices, (3) views that defend the protection of the embryo in virtue of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  34.  84
    The Morality of Embryo Use.Louis M. Guenin - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Is it permissible to use a human embryo in stem cell research, or in general as a means for benefit of others? Acknowledging each embryo as an object of moral concern, Louis M.Guenin argues that it is morally permissible to decline intrauterine transfer of an embryo formed outside the body, and that from this permission and the duty of beneficence, there follows a consensus justification for using donated embryos in service of humanitarian ends. He then proceeds to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  35.  26
    Human Embryo Research: From Moral Uncertainty to Death.Frederick Grinnell - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):12 – 13.
    Conventional approaches to pluralistic thinking in bioethics usually attempt in one fashion or another to isolate and choose between the different perspectives. I would argue, however, that the essentialist and existentialist perspectives on the embryo each are internally self-consistent and ethically correct within their own framework and at the same time mutually exclusive. Therefore, we will Žnd no ethical high ground on which to base a choice. Rather, human embryo research will continue to be characterized by a multiplicity (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  36.  18
    Google Embryo for Building Quantitative Understanding of an Embryo As It Builds Itself. I. Lessons From Ganymede and Google Earth.Richard Gordon - 2009 - Biological Theory 4 (4):390-395.
    Google Earth allows us to obtain a new vision of the planet we live on, with an ability to zoom in from space to ground level detail at any point on Earth. As it is only recently that we have been able to look toward the Earth from space, we review instead the history of imaging of the Jupiter moon Ganymede, another globe, first seen by Galileo. Observations of Ganymede are mined for lessons on the importance and impact of improving (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  37.  65
    Frozen Embryos, Genetic Information and Reproductive Rights.Sarah Chan & Muireann Quigley - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (8):439–448.
    Recent ethical and legal challenges have arisen concerning the rights of individuals over their IVF embryos, leading to questions about how, when the wishes of parents regarding their embryos conflict, such situations ought to be resolved. A notion commonly invoked in relation to frozen embryo disputes is that of reproductive rights: a right to have (or not to have) children. This has sometimes been interpreted to mean a right to have, or not to have, one's own genetic children. But (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  86
    Donating Fresh Versus Frozen Embryos to Stem Cell Research: In Whose Interests?Carolyn McLeod & Françoise Baylis - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (9):465–477.
    Some stem cell researchers believe that it is easier to derive human embryonic stem cells from fresh rather than frozen embryos and they have had in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinicians invite their infertility patients to donate their fresh embryos for research use. These embryos include those that are deemed 'suitable for transfer' (i.e. to the woman's uterus) and those deemed unsuitable in this regard. This paper focuses on fresh embryos deemed suitable for transfer - hereafter 'fresh embryos'- which IVF patients (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  39.  5
    Borderlands of Life: IVF Embryos and the Law in the United States, United Kingdom, and Germany.Ingrid Metzler & Sheila Jasanoff - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (6):1001-1037.
    Human embryos produced in labs since the 1970s have generated layers of uncertainty for law and policy: ontological, moral, and administrative. Ontologically, these lab-made entities fall into a gray zone between life and not-yet-life. Should in vitro embryos be treated as inanimate matter, like abandoned postsurgical tissue, or as private property? Morally, should they exist largely outside of state control in the zone of free reproductive choice or should they be regarded as autonomous human lives and thus entitled to constitutional (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40.  17
    Embryo Experimentation in Buddhist Ethics.Piyali Mitra - 2018 - Journal of Dharma Studies 1 (1):163-178.
    The objective of this paper is to explore the Buddhist position particularly within the Mahāyāna sect about the use of human embryos which may be either surplus embryos thawedinthe laboratoryorembryosculturedfor researchpurposes.Buddhismdoesnot give prominence to any supreme creation whose plan might be distorted by human intervention with nature. Buddhism postulates the cyclic course of human existence as eternal. There is no starting point to the series of lives lived and obviously there is no end. In the Buddhist thought, there is a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Moral Uncertainty and Human Embryo Experimentation.Graham Oddie - 1994 - In K. W. M. Fulford, Grant Gillett & Janet Martin Soskice (eds.), Medicine and Moral Reasoning. Cambridge University Press. pp. 3--144.
    Moral dilemmas can arise from uncertainty, including uncertainty of the real values involved. One interesting example of this is that of experimentation on human embryos and foetuses, If these have a moral stauts similar to that of human persons then there will be server constraitns on what may be done to them. If embryous have a moral status similar to that of other small clusters of cells, then constraints will be motivated largely by consideration for the persons into whom the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  42.  81
    Embryos, Souls, and the Fourth Dimension.David W. Shoemaker - 2005 - Social Theory and Practice 31 (1):51-75.
    This paper defends the permissibility of stem cell research against a theological objector who objects to it by appealing to "souls.".
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  43. Human Embryos as Individuals and Persons.Peter Volek - 2010 - Filozofia 65 (6):538-551.
    In his paper, the author argues that human embryos are individuals and persons. He accepts the critique of the non-individuation argument of human zygote and refutes the possibility of understanding blastomers as individuals. Finally, realism in the understanding of personal identity is accepted on the basis of an argument justifying substantial form as a principle of personal identity.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  40
    Genes, Embryos, and Future People.Walter Glannon - 1998 - Bioethics 12 (3):187–211.
  45.  6
    Embryo Disposition Disputes: Controversies and Case Law.I. Glenn Cohen & Eli Y. Adashi - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (4):13-19.
    When prospective parents use in vitro fertilization, many of them hope to generate more embryos than they intend to implant immediately. The technology often requires multiple attempts to reach a successful pregnancy, and couples can cryopreserve any excess embryos so that they have them on hand for later attempts. As part of obtaining informed consent for IVF or cryopreservation, clinics typically ask patients to specify their preferences for the embryos in the event of divorce or death, offering options such as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  29
    Natural Embryo Loss and the Moral Status of the Human Fetus.Sarah-Vaughan Brakman - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (7):22 – 23.
  47.  24
    Human Embryos in the Original Position?Russell Disilvestro - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (3):285 – 304.
    Two different discussions in John Rawls' A Theory of Justice lead naturally to a rather conservative position on the moral status of the human embryo. When discussing paternalism, he claims that the parties in the original position would seek to protect themselves in case they end up as incapacitated or undeveloped human beings when the veil of ignorance is lifted. Since human embryos are examples of such beings, the parties in the original position would seek to protect themselves from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  48. Moral Uncertainty in Bioethical Argumentation: A New Understanding of the Pro-Life View on Early Human Embryos.Tomasz Żuradzki - 2014 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 35 (6):441-457.
    In this article, I present a new interpretation of the pro-life view on the status of early human embryos. In my understanding, this position is based not on presumptions about the ontological status of embryos and their developmental capabilities but on the specific criteria of rational decisions under uncertainty and on a cautious response to the ambiguous status of embryos. This view, which uses the decision theory model of moral reasoning, promises to reconcile the uncertainty about the ontological status of (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  49.  32
    Embryo Adoption Reconsidered.Edward J. Furton - 2010 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 10 (2):329-347.
    The question of embryo adoption remains unresolved. Dignitas personae expresses reservations about the practice, but does not reject it. A proper interpretation of Dignitas personae n. 19 shows that the Vatican does not hold that human embryo adoption is intrinsically immoral, but that the question of its morality depends on the circumstances that surround the practice. Embryo adoption as practiced today is often compromised by illicit cooperation with objectionable reproductive technologies; nonetheless, it is possible to identify a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  14
    Embryos, Words, and Numbers: The Ethical Treatment of Opinion.Jeremy B. A. Green - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (1):7 – 9.
1 — 50 / 1000