Results for 'depression'

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  1.  2
    Depression and Physician-Aid-in-Dying.Ian Tully - 2022 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 47 (3):368-386.
    In this paper, I address the question of whether it is ever permissible to grant a request for physician-aid-in-dying from an individual suffering from treatment-resistant depression. I assume for the sake of argument that PAD is sometimes permissible. There are three requirements for PAD: suffering, prognosis, and competence. First, an individual must be suffering from an illness or injury which is sufficient to cause serious, ongoing hardship. Second, one must have exhausted effective treatment options, and one’s prospects for recovery (...)
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  2. Depression as a Disorder of Consciousness.Cecily Whiteley - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    First-person reports of Major Depressive Disorder reveal that when an individual becomes depressed a profound change or ‘shift’ to one’s conscious experience occurs. The depressed person reports that something fundamental to their experience has been disturbed or shifted; a change associated with the common but elusive claim that when depressed one finds oneself in a ‘different world’ detached from reality and other people. Existing attempts to utilise these phenomenological observations in a psychiatric context are challenged by the fact that this (...)
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  3.  12
    Depression, Emotion and the Self: Philosophical and Interdisciplinary Perspectives.Matthew Ratcliffe & Achim Stephan (eds.) - 2014 - Imprint Academic.
    This volume addresses the question of what it is like to be depressed. Despite the vast amount of research that has been conducted into the causes and treatment of depression, the experience of depression remains poorly understood. Indeed, many depression memoirs state that the experience is impossible for others to understand. However, it is at least clear that changes in emotion, mood, and bodily feeling are central to all forms of depression, and these are the book's (...)
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  4.  99
    Depression and Embodiment: Phenomenological Reflections on Motility, Affectivity, and Transcendence.Kevin A. Aho - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):751-759.
    This paper integrates personal narratives with the methods of phenomenology in order to draw some general conclusions about ‘what it means’ and ‘what it feels like’ to be depressed. The analysis has three parts. First, it explores the ways in which depression disrupts everyday experiences of spatial orientation and motility. This disruption makes it difficult for the person to move and perform basic functional tasks, resulting in a collapse or contraction of the life-world. Second, it illustrates how depression (...)
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  5.  73
    Depression, Intercorporeality, and Interaffectivity.Thomas Fuchs - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    According to current opinion in western psychopathology, depression is regarded as a disorder of mood and affect on the one hand, and as a distortion of cognition on the other. Disturbances of bodily experience and of social relations are regarded as secondary to the primarily 'inner'and individual disorder. However, quite different concepts can be found in cultures whose members do not experience themselves as much as separate individuals but rather as parts of social communities. Disorders of mood or well-being (...)
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  6.  32
    Depression: The Predisposing Influence of Stress.Hymie Anisman & Robert M. Zacharko - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):89-99.
    Aversive experiences have been thought to provoke or exacerbate clinical depression. The present review provides a brief survey of the stress-depression literature and suggests that the effects of stressful experiences on affective state may be related to depletion of several neurotransmitters, including norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin. A major element in determining the neurochemical changes is the organism's ability to cope with the aversive stimuli through behavioral means. Aversive experiences give rise to behavioral attempts to cope with the stressor, (...)
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  7. Depression as Existential Feeling or de-Situatedness? Distinguishing Structure From Mode in Psychopathology.Anthony Vincent Fernandez - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (4):595-612.
    In this paper I offer an alternative phenomenological account of depression as consisting of a degradation of the degree to which one is situated in and attuned to the world. This account contrasts with recent accounts of depression offered by Matthew Ratcliffe and others. Ratcliffe develops an account in which depression is understood in terms of deep moods, or existential feelings, such as guilt or hopelessness. Such moods are capable of limiting the kinds of significance and meaning (...)
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  8.  61
    Depression and Decision-Making Capacity for Treatment or Research: A Systematic Review.Thomas Hindmarch, Matthew Hotopf & Gareth S. Owen - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):54.
    Psychiatric disorders can pose problems in the assessment of decision-making capacity (DMC). This is so particularly where psychopathology is seen as the extreme end of a dimension that includes normality. Depression is an example of such a psychiatric disorder. Four abilities (understanding, appreciating, reasoning and ability to express a choice) are commonly assessed when determining DMC in psychiatry and uncertainty exists about the extent to which depression impacts capacity to make treatment or research participation decisions.
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  9. An Expert System for Depression Diagnosis.Izzeddin A. Alshawwa, Mohammed Elkahlout, Hosni Qasim El-Mashharawi & Samy S. Abu-Naser - 2019 - International Journal of Academic Health and Medical Research (IJAHMR) 3 (4):20-27.
    Background: Depression (major depressive disorder) is a common and serious medical illness that negatively affects how you feel, the way you think and how you act. Fortunately, it is also treatable. Depression causes feelings of sadness and/or a loss of interest in activities once enjoyed. It can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems and can decrease a person’s ability to function at work and at home. Depression affects an estimated one in 15 adults (6.7%) (...)
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  10. Depression, Possibilities, and Competence: A Phenomenological Perspective. [REVIEW]Gerben Meynen - 2011 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 32 (3):181-193.
    Competent decision-making is required for informed consent. In this paper, I aim, from a phenomenological perspective, to identify the specific facets of competent decision-making that may form a challenge to depressed patients. On a phenomenological account, mood and emotions are crucial to the way in which human beings encounter the world. More precisely, mood is intimately related to the options and future possibilities we perceive in the world around us. I examine how possibilities should be understood in this context, and (...)
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  11. Depression and Suicide Are Natural Kinds: Implications for Physician-Assisted Suicide.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2013 - International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 36 (5-6):461-470.
    In this article, I argue that depression and suicide are natural kinds insofar as they are classes of abnormal behavior underwritten by sets of stable biological mechanisms. In particular, depression and suicide are neurobiological kinds characterized by disturbances in serotonin functioning that affect various brain areas (i.e., the amygdala, anterior cingulate, prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus). The significance of this argument is that the natural (biological) basis of depression and suicide allows for reliable projectable inferences (i.e., predictions) to (...)
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  12. Depressive Delusions.Magdalena Antrobus & Lisa Bortolotti - 2016 - Filosofia Unisinos 17 (2):192-201.
    In this paper we have two main aims. First, we present an account of mood-congruent delusions in depression (hereafter, depressive delusions). We propose that depressive delusions constitute acknowledgements of self-related beliefs acquired as a result of a negatively biased learning process. Second, we argue that depressive delusions have the potential for psychological and epistemic benefits despite their obvious epistemic and psychological costs. We suggest that depressive delusions play an important role in preserving a person’s overall coherence and narrative identity (...)
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  13. Depression and the Problem of Absent Desires.Ian Tully - 2017 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 11 (2):1-16.
    I argue that consideration of certain cases of severe depression reveals a problem for desire-based theories of welfare. I first show that depression can result in a person losing her desires and then identify a case wherein it seems right to think that, as a result of very severe depression, the individuals described no longer have any desires whatsoever. I argue that the state these people are in is a state of profound ill-being: their lives are going (...)
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  14. Patronizing Depression: Epistemic Injustice, Stigmatizing Attitudes, and the Need for Empathy.Jake Jackson - 2017 - Journal of Social Philosophy 48 (3):359-376.
    In this article, I examine stigmatizing and especially patronizing attitudes towards others’ depression that people who are well-intentioned produce. The strategy of the article is to consider the social experience of depression through two separate subfields of philosophy: epistemic injustice and phenomenology. The solution that I propose is a phenomenological account of empathy. The empathetic attitude that I argue for involves actively listening to the depressed individual and taking their depression testimony as direct evidence. The article has (...)
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  15. Depression, Listlessness, and Moral Motivation.Michael Cholbi - 2011 - Ratio 24 (1):28-45.
    Motivational internalism (MI) holds that, necessarily, if an agent judges that she is morally obligated to ø, then, that agent is, to at least some minimal extent, motivated to ø. Opponents of MI sometimes invoke depression as a counterexample on the grounds that depressed individuals appear to sincerely affirm moral judgments but are ‘listless’ and unmotivated by such judgments. Such listlessness is a credible counterexample to MI, I argue, only if the actual clinical disorder of depression, rather than (...)
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  16. The Brain, Emotion, and Depression.Edmund T. Rolls - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    What produces emotions? Why do we have emotions? How do we have emotions? Why do emotional states feel like something? The Brain, Emotion, and Depression addresses these issues and more, providing a unified approach to emotion, reward value, economic value, decision-making, and their brain mechanisms.
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  17.  91
    Depression as Unhomelike Being-in-the-World? Phenomenology’s Challenge to Our Understanding of Illness.Tamara Kayali & Furhan Iqbal - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (1):31-39.
    Fredrik Svenaeus has applied Heidegger’s concept of ‘being-in-the-world’ to health and illness. Health, Svenaeus contends, is a state of ‘homelike being-in-the-world’ characterised by being ‘balanced’ and ‘in-tune’ with the world. Illness, on the other hand, is a state of ‘unhomelike being-in-the-world’ characterised by being ‘off-balance’ and alienated from our own bodies. This paper applies the phenomenological concepts presented by Svenaeus to cases from a study of depression. In doing so, we show that while they can certainly enrich our understanding (...)
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  18. Depression’s Threat to Self-Governance.August Gorman - 2020 - Social Theory and Practice 46 (2):277-297.
    Much of the literature on impairment to self-governance focuses on cases in which a person either lacks the ability to protect herself from errant urges or cases in which a person lacks the capacity to initiate self-reflective agential processes. This has led to frameworks for thinking about self-governance designed with only the possibility of these sorts of impairments in mind. I challenge this orthodoxy using the case of melancholic depression to show that there is a third way that self-governance (...)
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  19. Autonomy and Depression.Lubomira Radoilska - 2013 - In K. W. M. Fulford, Martin Davis, George Graham, John Sadler, Giovanni Stanghellini & Tim Thornton (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press. pp. 1155-1170.
    In this paper, I address two related challenges the phenomenon of depression raises for conceptions according to which autonomy is an agency concept and an independent source of justification. The first challenge is directed at the claim that autonomous agency involves intending under the guise of the good: the robust though not always direct link between evaluation and motivation implied here seems to be severed in some instances of depression; yet, this does not seem to affect the possibility (...)
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  20.  13
    Psychometric Origins of Depression.Susan McPherson & David Armstrong - 2022 - History of the Human Sciences 35 (3-4):127-143.
    This article examines the historical construction of depression over about a hundred years, employing the social life of methods as an explanatory framework. Specifically, it considers how emerging methodologies in the measurement of psychological constructs contributed to changes in epistemological approaches to mental illness and created the conditions of possibility for major shifts in the construction of depression. While depression was once seen as a feature of psychotic personality, measurement technologies made it possible for it to be (...)
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  21.  71
    Demarcating Depression.Ian Tully - 2019 - Ratio 32 (2):114-121.
    How to draw the line between depression-as-disorder and non-pathological depressive symptoms continues to be a contested issue in psychiatry. Relatively few philosophers have waded into this debate, but the tools of philosophical analysis are quite relevant to it. In this paper, I defend a particular answer to this question, the Contextual approach.On this view, depression is a disorder if and only if it is a disproportionate response to a justifying cause or else is unconnected to any justifying cause. (...)
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  22.  25
    The Depressed Brain: An Evolutionary Systems Theory.Paul B. Badcock, Christopher G. Davey, Sarah Whittle, Nicholas B. Allen & Karl J. Friston - 2017 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 21 (3):182-194.
  23. Depression and Motivation.Benedict Smith - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):615-635.
    Among the characteristic features of depression is a diminishment in or lack of action and motivation. In this paper, I consider a dominant philosophical account which purports to explain this lack of action or motivation. This approach comes in different versions but a common theme is, I argue, an over reliance on psychologistic assumptions about action–explanation and the nature of motivation. As a corrective I consider an alternative view that gives a prominent place to the body in motivation. Central (...)
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  24.  35
    Depression and Competence to Refuse Psychiatric Treatment.A. Rudnick - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (3):151-155.
    Individuals with major depression may benefit from psychiatric treatment, yet they may refuse such treatment, sometimes because of their depression. Hence the question is raised whether such individuals are competent to refuse psychiatric treatment. The standard notion of competence to consent to treatment, which refers to expression of choice, understanding of medical information, appreciation of the personal relevance of this information, and logical reasoning, may be insufficient to address this question. This is so because major depression may (...)
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  25. Depression, Guilt and Emotional Depth.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2010 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 53 (6):602-626.
    It is generally maintained that emotions consist of intentional states and /or bodily feelings. This paper offers a phenomenological analysis of guilt in severe depression, in order to illustrate how such conceptions fail to adequately accommodate a way in which some emotional experiences are said to be deeper than others. Many emotions are intentional states. However, I propose that the deepest emotions are not intentional but pre-intentional, meaning that they determine which kinds of intentional state are possible. I go (...)
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  26. The Phenomenology of Depression and the Nature of Empathy.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):269-280.
    This paper seeks to illuminate the nature of empathy by reflecting upon the phenomenology of depression. I propose that depression involves alteration of an aspect of experience that is seldom reflected upon or discussed, thus making it hard to understand. This alteration involves impairment or loss of a capacity for interpersonal relatedness that mutual empathy depends upon. The sufferer thus feels cut off from other people, and may remark on their indifference, hostility or inability to understand. Drawing upon (...)
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  27. Depression: A Public Feeling.Anne Cvetkovich - 2012
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  28. Temporal Inabilities and Decision-Making Capacity in Depression.Gareth S. Owen, Fabian Freyenhagen, Matthew Hotopf & Wayne Martin - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):163-182.
    We report on an interview-based study of decision-making capacity in two classes of patients suffering from depression. Developing a method of second-person hermeneutic phenomenology, we articulate the distinctive combination of temporal agility and temporal inability characteristic of the experience of severely depressed patients. We argue that a cluster of decision-specific temporal abilities is a critical element of decision-making capacity, and we show that loss of these abilities is a risk factor distinguishing severely depressed patients from mildly/moderately depressed patients. We (...)
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  29.  1
    Depression: Law and Ethics.Charles Foster & Jonathan Herring (eds.) - 2017 - Oxford University Press.
    If the law is to regulate the lives of those who suffer from depression, it is vital that lawyers understand the condition. This edited collection outlines the questions that arise from cases of depression by drawing together viewpoints from lawyers, philosophers, clinicians, and first-hand accounts from sufferers.
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  30.  57
    Affectivity and Narrativity in Depression: A Phenomenological Study.Anna Bortolan - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (1):77-88.
    In this study I explore from a phenomenological perspective the relationship between affectivity and narrative self-understanding in depression. Phenomenological accounts often conceive of the disorder as involving disturbances of the narrative self and suggest that these disturbances are related to the alterations of emotions and moods typical of the illness. In this paper I expand these accounts by advancing two sets of claims. In the first place, I suggest that, due to the loss of feeling characteristic of the illness, (...)
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  31.  81
    Experiences of Depression: A Study in Phenomenology.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Experiences of Depression is a philosophical exploration of what it is like to be depressed. In this important new book, Matthew Ratcliffe develops a detailed account of depression experiences by drawing on work in phenomenology, philosophy of mind and psychology, and several other disciplines.
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  32.  32
    Hopelessness Depression: A Theory-Based Subtype of Depression.Lyn Y. Abramson, Gerald I. Metalsky & Lauren B. Alloy - 1989 - Psychological Review 96 (2):358-372.
  33.  27
    Shame, Depression, and Social Melancholy.Kelly Oliver - 2020 - Sophia 59 (1):31-38.
    The pathologization of women’s depression covers over the social and institutional causes of that symptomology. Insofar as patriarchal values continue to devalue and debase women and mothers in ways that colonize psychic space, and depression becomes a cover for what I call ‘social melancholy.’ This is not the melancholy of traditional psychoanalysis, but a form of melancholy that results from oppression, domination, and the colonization of psychic space. Social melancholy differs from both Freud’s notion of melancholy in that (...)
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  34.  1
    Melancholic Depression. A Hermeneutic Phenomenological Account.Francesca Brencio & Valeria Bizzari - 2022 - Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia 13 (2):94-107.
    : The overarching aim of this paper is to provide a comprehensive account of melancholic depression from the perspective of hermeneutic phenomenology. More specifically, we propose that this condition should be interpreted as an alteration in the intentional arc that affects corporeality, temporality, and spatiality, rather than as a mood disorder. In fact, classifying melancholic depression as a mood disorder seems a particularly poor choice; the mood disorder is not a cause but a consequence of a primary disturbance (...)
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  35. Bodily Saturation and Social Disconnectedness in Depression.Lucy Osler - 2021 - Phenomenology and Mind 21:48-61.
    Individuals suffering from depression consistently report experiencing a lack of connectedness with others. David Karp (2017, 73), in his memoir and study of depression, has gone so far to describe depression as “an illness of isolation, a disease of disconnectedness”. It has become common, in phenomenological circles, to attribute this social impairment to the depressed individual experiencing their body as corporealized, acting as a barrier between them and the world around them (Fuchs 2005, 2016). In this paper, (...)
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  36.  35
    Encountering Depression In-Depth : An Existential-Phenomenological Approach to Selfhood, Depression, and Psychiatric Practice.Patrick Seniuk - 2020 - Dissertation, Södertörn University
    This dissertation in Theory of Practical Knowledge contends that depression is a disorder of the self. Using the existential-phenomenology of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, I argue that if we want to disclose the basic structure of depressed experience, then we must likewise disclose how selfexperience is inseparable from depressed experience. However, even though depression is a contemporary psychiatric category of illness, it is nevertheless a historically and heterogenous concept. To make sense of depression in the context of contemporary psychiatric (...)
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  37.  2
    Depressive Traits Are Associated with a Reduced Effect of Choice on Intentional Binding.N. J. Scott, M. Ghanem, B. Beck & A. K. Martin - 2022 - Consciousness and Cognition 105:103412.
  38. 'Is Depression a Sin or a Disease?' A Critique of Moralising and Medicalising Models of Mental Illness.Anastasia Philoppa Scrutton - forthcoming - Journal of Religion and Disability.
    Moralising accounts of depression include the idea that depression is a sin or the result of sin, and/or that it is the result of demonic possession which has occurred because of moral or spiritual failure. Increasingly some Christian communities, understandably concerned about the debilitating effects these views have on people with depression, have adopted secular folk psychiatry’s ‘medicalising’ campaign, emphasising that depression is an illness for which, like (so-called) physical illnesses, experients should not be held responsible. (...)
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  39. Are Depression and Suffering Distinct? An Empirical Analysis.Richard G. Cowden, Dorota Wȩziak-Białowolska, Eileen McNeely & Tyler J. VanderWeele - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Depression and the subjective experience of suffering are distinct forms of distress, but they are sometimes commingled with one another. Using a cross-sectional sample of flight attendants, we tested for further empirical evidence distinguishing depression and suffering. Correlations with 15 indices covering several dimensions of well-being indicated that associations with worse well-being were mostly stronger for depression than suffering. There was a large positive correlation between depression and suffering, but we also found evidence of notable non-concurrent (...)
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  40.  38
    Depressive Habituality and Altered Valuings. The Phenomenology of Depressed Mental Life.Jann E. Schlimme - 2013 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 44 (1):92-118.
    Phenomenological descriptions of depressed mental life offer a profound understanding of depression from the first-person perspective. In this paper, such descriptions are developed by drawing on the work by Ludwig Binswanger and on the autobiographical report of depression by Piet C. Kuiper . I will argue that Binswanger’s central claim in his phenomenological description of the depressed state of mind fails due to crucial misunderstandings of Edmund Husserl’s phenomenology. Nonetheless, by drawing on Kuiper’s first-hand account, I will develop (...)
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  41. What is Depression?John-Michael Kuczynski - 2018 - Madison, WI, USA: Freud Institute.
    If a person has done what he should have done, he is satisfied. If he is in the process of doing what he should do, he is happy but not content. If he is trying to do what he should do but he is being thwarted in his efforts, he is frustrated but not depressed. If, having been thwarted in his attempts to do what he should do, he resigns himself to failure, then he is depressed.
     
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  42. Depression in the Context of Disability and the “Right to Die”.Carol J. Gill - 2004 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (3):171-198.
    Arguments in favor of legalized assisted suicide often center on issues of personal privacy and freedom of choice over one's body. Many disability advocates assert, however, that autonomy arguments neglect the complex sociopolitical determinants of despair for people with disabilities. Specifically, they argue that social approval of suicide for individuals with irreversible conditions is discriminatory and that relaxing restrictions on assisted suicide would jeopardize, not advance, the freedom of persons with disabilities to direct the lives they choose. This paper examines (...)
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  43.  31
    Depression Applied to Moral Imagination.Justin Bell - 2018 - Southwest Philosophy Review 34 (1):93-101.
    Based upon research done by evolutionary psychologists into the reason why human beings feel depression in social situations, I argue that philosophers have significant warrant to consider depression as an important feature conditioning moral imagination. The moral imagination come up with new enterprises and new ways of organizing social life. This reorganization would meet many of the goals put forth by pragmatist philosopher John Dewey. I argue that depression will work as a leading clue and unique imaginative (...)
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  44.  6
    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 in Chinese Hospital Workers: Reliability, Latent Structure, and Measurement Invariance Across Genders.Li-Chen Jiang, Ya-jun Yan, Zhi-Shuai Jin, Mu-Li Hu, Ling Wang, Yu Song, Na-Ni Li, Jun Su, Da-Xing Wu & Tao Xiao - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    The Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 is an instrument in the assessment of mental health status. The current study recruited 1,532 Chinese hospital workers [74.4% female; mean age = 31.97 years] to examine the reliability, latent structure, and measurement invariance of the DASS-21 between genders. The Cronbach’s α values were greater than 0.90 for total score. This study examined four possible models of the DASS-21 using the confirmatory factor analysis in Chinese hospital workers. The results from CFA revealed that the (...)
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  45.  73
    Depression and the Self Bodily Resonance and Attuned Being-in-the-World.Fredrik Svenaeus - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    This paper will explore the relationship between selfhood and depression, by focusing upon the lived body's capacity to 'resonate'with the world and thus open up an 'attuned' space of meaning. Persons will become differently tuned in different situations because they embody different patterns of resonance -- what is most often referred to as different temperaments -- but the self may also suffer from idiosyncrasies in mood profile that develop into deficiencies of resonance, making the person in question ill. In (...)
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  46.  7
    Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Cancer: A Cross-Sectional Study.Abdallah Y. Naser, Anas Nawfal Hameed, Nour Mustafa, Hassan Alwafi, Eman Zmaily Dahmash, Hamad S. Alyami & Haya Khalil - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    ObjectivesDepression and anxiety persist in cancer patients, creating an additional burden during treatment and making it more challenging in terms of management and control. Studies on the prevalence of depression and anxiety among cancer patients in the Middle East are limited and include many limitations such as their small sample sizes and restriction to a specific type of cancer in specific clinical settings. This study aimed to describe the prevalence and risk factors of depression and anxiety among cancer (...)
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  47. Is Depressive Rumination Rational?Timothy Lane & Georg Northoff - 2016 - In T. W. Hung & T. J. Lane (eds.), Rationality: Constraints and Contexts. Oxford, UK: Elsevier. pp. 121-145.
    Most mental disorders affect only a small segment of the population. On the reasonable assumption that minds or brains are prone to occasional malfunction, these disorders do not seem to pose distinctive explanatory problems. Depression, however, because it is so prevalent and costly, poses a conundrum that some try to explain by characterizing it as an adaptation—a trait that exists because it performed fitness-enhancing functions in ancestral populations. Heretofore, proposed evolutionary explanations of depression did not focus on thought (...)
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  48.  61
    Artificial Intelligence, Social Media and Depression. A New Concept of Health-Related Digital Autonomy.Sebastian Laacke, Regina Mueller, Georg Schomerus & Sabine Salloch - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (7):4-20.
    The development of artificial intelligence in medicine raises fundamental ethical issues. As one example, AI systems in the field of mental health successfully detect signs of mental disorders...
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  49. Longitudinal Survey of Depressive Symptoms Among University Students During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Japan.Kyoko Nomura, Teiichiro Yamazaki, Eri Maeda, Junko Hirayama, Kyoichi Ono, Masahito Fushimi, Kazuo Mishima & Fumio Yamamoto - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    While changes in response to the different stages of the pandemic remain unknown, this study investigated the longitudinal impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on depressive symptoms in Japanese university students and identified factors associated with new onset of depression and suicidal ideation. Two surveys were conducted at one university in Akita, Japan, during the first COVID-19 outbreak period and 1 year later. Moderate depressive symptoms were defined as a Patient Health Questionnaire-9 score ≥ 10 and suicide-related ideation score ≥ (...)
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  50. Depression in Japan: Psychiatric Cures for a Society in Distress.[author unknown] - 2011
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