Results for 'death penalty'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. The Death Penalty: For and Against.Jeffrey Reiman & Louis P. Pojman - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Two distinguished social and political philosophers take opposing positions in this highly engaging work. Louis P. Pojman justifies the practice of execution by appealing to the principle of retribution while Jeffrey Reiman argues that although the death penalty is a just punishment for murder, we are not morally obliged to execute murderers.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  2. The Death Penalty Debate: Four Problems and New Philosophical Perspectives.Masaki Ichinose - June 2017 - Journal of Practical Ethics 5 (1):53-80.
    This paper aims at bringing a new philosophical perspective to the current debate on the death penalty through a discussion of peculiar kinds of uncertainties that surround the death penalty. I focus on laying out the philosophical argument, with the aim of stimulating and restructuring the death penalty debate. I will begin by describing views about punishment that argue in favour of either retaining the death penalty (‘retentionism’) or abolishing it (‘abolitionism’). I (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  81
    Derrida and the Death Penalty: The Question of Cruelty.Robert Trumbull - 2015 - Philosophy Today 59 (2):317-336.
    This paper looks at the recently published text of Derrida’s 1999–2000 Death Penalty Seminars, reading it alongside a key text from the early 2000s, Derrida’s address to the Estates General of Psychoanalysis. Tracking Derrida’s insistent references to psychoanalysis in his writings on the issue of capital punishment, I argue that the deconstruction of the death penalty, in its full scope, can perhaps best be approached in the terms emerging out of Derrida’s engagement with psychoanalysis in this (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4. The Death Penalty and Deontology.Carol Steiker - 2011 - In John Deigh & David Dolinko (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  5. The Death Penalty Divides the West.Danilo Zolo - 2009 - Iris. European Journal of Philosophy and Public Debate 1 (1):83-110.
    The death penalty is so deeply rooted in the history of humanity that it will not be possible to abolish it any time soon, together with its ancestral models, such as lynching, stoning and torture. There is little use in appealing to absolute ethical values or to juridical principles held to be universal. A realistic approach suggests a careful consideration of the function the death penalty performed – and still performs – in the structures of political (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Death Penalties: A Review of Raoul Berger, Death Penalties. [REVIEW]William A. Edmundson - 1984 - Duke Law Journal 1984:624-29.
    This is a critical review of Death Penalties by constitutional scholar Raoul Berger. It rebuts Berger's argument that the Eighth Amendment "no cruel and unusual punishments" clause validates capital punishment.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Consequentialism and the Death Penalty.Dominic J. Wilkinson & Thomas Douglas - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):56-58.
    Comment on "The ethical 'elephant' in the death penalty 'room'". Arguments in defense of the death penalty typically fall into one of two groups. Consequentialist arguments point out beneficial aspects of capital punishment, normally focusing on deterrence, while non-consequentialist arguments seek to justify execution independently of its effects, for example, by appealing to the concept of retribution. Michael Keane's target article "The ethical 'elephant' in the death penalty 'room'" should, we believe, be read as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8.  16
    From Death Penalty to Thanatopolitics.Sabeen Ahmed - 2019 - Philosophy Today 63 (2):293-314.
    Drawing from the works of Carl Schmitt, Michel Foucault, Giorgio Agamben, and Jacques Derrida, this article offers a theory of political theology for the contemporary Western liberal nation-state. Taking as its starting point the death penalty, it presents a triune theory of governance—what I call Trinitarian Governmentality—which exposes the thanatopolitical dimension fundamental to the very articulation of sovereign power and, as such, the theologico-political. It is thus only by conceptualizing sovereignty as Trinitarian Governmentality—composed of biopower/oikonomia, disciplinary power/theologia, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. The Structure of Death Penalty Arguments.Matt Stichter - 2014 - Res Publica 20 (2):129-143.
    In death penalty debates, advocates on both sides have advanced a staggering number of arguments to defend their positions. Many of those arguments fail to support retaining or abolishing the death penalty, and often this is due to advocates pursuing a line of reasoning where the conclusion, even if correctly established, will not ultimately prove decisive. Many of these issues are also interconnected and shouldn’t be treated separately. The goal of this paper is to provide some (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  20
    The Death Penalty Within the Bounds of Life/Death Alone: From the Deconstruction of Life to the Possibility of a Future Abolition.Armando Mastrogiovanni - 2018 - Oxford Literary Review 40 (2):181-205.
    This paper situates Derrida's two-year seminar on The Death Penalty within the new thinking of life he often insists lies at the heart of deconstruction. Derrida argues that the philosophical tradition is fundamentally unable to conceive of a principled opposition to the death penalty because within its system, the latter is both the quasi-transcendental condition of possibility of law in general and the very ‘proper of man’—the sacrificial machinery that makes human life inviolable. Against this tradition, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  25
    Death Penalty: The Political Foundations of the Global Trend Towards Abolition. [REVIEW]Eric Neumayer - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (2):241-268.
    The death penalty is like no other punishment. Its continued existence in many countries of the world creates political tensions within these countries and between governments of retentionist and abolitionist countries. After the Second World War, more and more countries have abolished the death penalty. This article argues that the major determinants of this global trend towards abolition are political, a claim which receives support in a quantitative cross-national analysis from 1950 to 2002. Democracy, democratisation, international (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  75
    The Death Penalty, in Other Words, Philosophy.Kas Saghafi - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (s1):136-142.
    In response to Thomas Dutoit's ambitious summary of the two years of Derrida's Death Penalty Seminars, I take up the following themes: the deconstruction of death, Hugo's “advance,” and “the principle of substitution” in Freud.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  3
    The Death Penalty, Volume Ii.Jacques Derrida - 2017 - University of Chicago Press.
    "In this newest installment in Chicagos series of Jacques Derridas seminars, the renowned philosopher attempts one of his most ambitious goals: the first truly philosophical argument against the death penalty. While much has been written against the death penalty, Derrida contends that Western philosophy is massively, if not always overtly, complicit with a logic in which a sovereign state has the right to take a life. Haunted by this notion, he turns to the key places where (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  37
    The Death Penalty and the Peculiarity of American Political Institutions.Sangmin Bae - 2008 - Human Rights Review 9 (2):233-240.
    This article examines distinctive American political institutions that contribute to explaining the continued use of the death penalty. In the light of wide popular support for capital punishment, strong political leadership is considered to be a principal channel for the abolition of capital punishment. The dilemma of the US death penalty, however, lies in populist features of political structures that greatly limit the political leverage and possibilities available to leaders. The institutional arrangements in the United States (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  3
    The Death Penalty, Volume I.Jacques Derrida - 2013 - University of Chicago Press.
    In this newest installment in Chicago’s series of Jacques Derrida’s seminars, the renowned philosopher attempts one of his most ambitious goals: the first truly philosophical argument against the death penalty. While much has been written against the death penalty, Derrida contends that Western philosophy is massively, if not always overtly, complicit with a logic in which a sovereign state has the right to take a life. Haunted by this notion, he turns to the key places where (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  30
    Protocol: Death Penalty Addiction.Peggy Kamuf - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (s1):5-19.
    “What if the death penalty were a drug?” This question opens the essay and is pursued through two very different kinds of texts. On the one hand, Derrida's 1999–2000 Death Penalty Seminar is brought to bear for its analysis of what is called there the “anesthesial logic” of capital punishment. This logic, Derrida argues, has determined both pro– and anti–death penalty discourses since at least the mid-eighteenth century. On the other hand, the essay gathers (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  3
    The Death Penalty, Volume I.Peggy Kamuf (ed.) - 2013 - University of Chicago Press.
    In this newest installment in Chicago’s series of Jacques Derrida’s seminars, the renowned philosopher attempts one of his most ambitious goals: the first truly philosophical argument against the death penalty. While much has been written against the death penalty, Derrida contends that Western philosophy is massively, if not always overtly, complicit with a logic in which a sovereign state has the right to take a life. Haunted by this notion, he turns to the key places where (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18.  18
    Death Penalty in the Age of Dictatorship and War.Ivan Vuković - 2009 - Theoria: Beograd 52 (1):5-16.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Black Lives Matter and the Call for Death Penalty Abolition.Michael Cholbi & Alex Madva - 2018 - Ethics 128 (3):517-544.
    The Black Lives Matter movement has called for the abolition of capital punishment in response to what it calls “the war against Black people” and “Black communities.” This article defends the two central contentions in the movement’s abolitionist stance: first, that US capital punishment practices represent a wrong to black communities rather than simply a wrong to particular black capital defendants or particular black victims of murder, and second, that the most defensible remedy for this wrong is the abolition of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  20.  18
    The Death Penalty and Our Society.Izhar Groner - 1996 - Radical Philosophy Review of Books 14 (14):40-51.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Contractualism and the Death Penalty.Li Hon Lam - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):152-182.
    It is a truism that there are erroneous convictions in criminal trials. Recent legal findings show that 3.3% to 5%of all convictions in capital rape-murder cases in the U.S. in the 1980s were erroneous convictions. Given this fact, what normative conclusions can be drawn? First, the article argues that a moderately revised version of Scanlon’ s contractualism offers an attractive moral vision that is different from utilitarianism or other consequentialist theories, or from purely deontological theories. It then brings this version (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  58
    The Death Penalty and Victims' Rights: Legal Advance Directives. [REVIEW]Heather J. Gert - 1999 - Journal of Value Inquiry 33 (4):457-473.
  23. The Death Penalty as a Deterrent: Argument and Evidence.Hugo Adam Bedau - 1970 - Ethics 80 (3):205-217.
  24.  48
    The Death Penalty, Deterrence, and Horribleness: Reply to Michael Davis.Jeffrey Reiman - 1990 - Social Theory and Practice 16 (2):261-272.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  44
    Derrida on the Death Penalty.Matthias Fritsch - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (s1):56-73.
    Responding to Derrida's Death Penalty Seminar of 1999–2000 and its interpretation by Michael Naas, in this paper I argue that Derrida's deconstruction of the theologico-political concept of the sovereign right over life and death in view of abolishing capital punishment should be understood in terms of the unconditional renunciation of sovereignty that dominates Derrida's later political writings, Rogues (2005) in particular. My reading takes seriously what I call the functional need for a “theological” moment in sovereignty beyond (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26.  52
    The Death Penalty, Civilization, and Inhumaneness.Michael Davis - 1990 - Social Theory and Practice 16 (2):245-259.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  28
    The Death Penalty.Sidney Gendin - 1999 - Teaching Philosophy 22 (3):310-312.
  28. Justice, Civilization, and the Death Penalty: Answering Van den Haag.Jeffrey H. Reiman - 1985 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 14 (2):115-148.
  29.  7
    Death Penalty.Anindya Sekhar Purakayastha - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):529-533.
  30.  24
    The Death Penalty: Response to Ron Paul.Walter E. Block - 2015 - Criminal Justice Ethics 34 (3):339-349.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  8
    The Death Penalty, Deterrence, and Horribleness: Reply to Michael Davis.Jeffrey Reiman - 1990 - Social Theory and Practice 16 (2):261-272.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. The Death Penalty: A Personal View.McCloskey James - 1996 - Criminal Justice Ethics 15 (2):2.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  24
    The Death Penalty, Deterrence, and Horribleness: Reply to Michael Davis.Reiman Jeffrey - 1990 - Social Theory and Practice 16 (2):261-272.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. The Death Penalty for Corporations Comes of Age.Russell Mokhiber - 1998 - Business Ethics 12 (6).
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Kant's Justification of the Death Penalty Reconsidered.Benjamin S. Yost - 2010 - Kantian Review 15 (2):1-27.
    This paper argues that Immanuel Kant’s practical philosophy contains a coherent, albeit implicit, defense of the legitimacy of capital punishment, one that refutes the most important objections leveled against it. I first show that Kant is consistent in his application of the ius talionis. I then explain how Kant can respond to the claim that death penalty violates the inviolable right to life. To address the most significant objection – the claim that execution violates human dignity – I (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  36.  82
    Derrida: Opposing Death Penalties.Marguerite La Caze - 2009 - Derrida Today 2 (2):186-199.
    Derrida's purpose in ‘Death Penalties’ (2004), is to show how both arguments in favour of capital punishment, exemplified by Kant's, and arguments for its abolition, such as those of Beccaria, are deconstructible. He claims that ‘never, to my knowledge, has any philosopher as a philosopher, in his or her own strictly and systematically philosophical discourse, never has any philosophy as such contested the legitimacy of the death penalty.’ (2004, 146) Derrida also asks how it is possible ‘to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37.  12
    The Death Penalty, Volume 1 Jacques Derrida Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2014. 312 Pp. $35.00. [REVIEW]Christopher Langlois - 2014 - Dialogue 53 (4):756-758.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. The Death Penalty and the U.S. Supreme Court.William H. Bruening - unknown
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  1
    Death Penalty “Abolition” in Neoliberal Times: The SAFE California Act and the Nexus of Savings and Security.Andrew Dilts - 2015 - In Lisa Guenther, Geoffrey Adelsberg & Scott Zeman (eds.), Death and Other Penalties: Philosophy in a Time of Mass Incarceration. Fordham Up. pp. 106-129.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  18
    The Death Penalty in America.Hugo Adam Bedau - 1965 - Ethics 76 (1):63-66.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  5
    The Death Penalty in China: Policy, Practice, and Reform Edited by Bin Liang and Hong Lu: New York: Columbia University Press, 2016.Mika Obara-Minnitt - 2018 - Human Rights Review 19 (4):503-504.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  24
    The Abolition of the Death Penalty in Rwanda.Audrey Boctor - 2009 - Human Rights Review 10 (1):99-118.
    This paper argues that Rwanda’s decision to abolish the death penalty should be viewed in a wider context rather than as a mere result of top–down pressure from the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR). Part I traces the creation of the ICTR and the breakdown of negotiations as a result of the exclusion of the death penalty from the ICTR’s jurisdiction. It then outlines Rwanda’s efforts to prosecute the hundreds of thousands of individuals accused of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. The Morality of the Death Penalty.Qiu Xinglong - 2005 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 36 (3):9-25.
    The question of whether a system of criminal punishment is just, in terms of morality, can be approached from many angles. More than ten points relating to the retention or abolition of the death penalty have been raised in the dispute in the West over whether the death penalty is justifiable. In my view, it is unnecessary to address this number of issues, not simply because of space limitations that would make it difficult to deal with (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Should Japan Abolish the Death Penalty? No Definite Answer Exists Yet.Sakiko Maki & Atsushi Asai - 2012 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 22 (1):27-32.
    How should the Japanese death penalty system stand in the future? While banning the death penalty has become a global trend, Japanese public opinion still supports it, and the government continues to strongly insist retention of the system. Despite worldwide criticism towards Japanese opinion, until very recently have been no reductions in death penalty sentences or executions. Both abolitionist and retentionist countries have strong arguments to support their opinions, thus there is no decisive argument (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. In Defense of the Death Penalty.Louis Pojman - 1997 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 11 (2):11-16.
  46.  3
    Deconstructing the Death Penalty: Derrida's Seminars and the New Abolitionism.Kelly Oliver & Stephanie M. Straub (eds.) - 2018 - Fordham University Press.
    This volume represents the first collection of essays devoted exclusively to Jacques Derrida's Death Penalty Seminars, conducted from 1999-2001. The volume includes essays from a range of scholars working in philosophy, law, Francophone studies, and comparative literature, including established Derridians, activist scholars, and emerging scholars.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  62
    Retribution, the Death Penalty, and the Limits of Human Judgment.Anthony P. Roark - 1999 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (1):57-68.
    So serious a matter is capital punishment that we must consider very carefully any claim regarding its justification. Brian Calvert has offered a new version of the “argument from arbitrariness,” according to which a retributivist cannot consistently hold that some, but not all, first-degree murderers may justifiably receive the death penalty, when it is conceived to be a unique form of punishment. At the heart of this argument is the line-drawing problem, and I am inclined to think that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  21
    Extra Time and the Death Penalties: On a Newly Arisen Violent Tone in Philosophy.Martin McQuillan - 2009 - Derrida Today 2 (2):133-150.
    In light of recent writing on politics and violence within contemporary continental philosophy, this text revisits Derrida's frequently articulated philosophical opposition to the death penalty. This essay expresses dismay at a certain theoretical discourse today that finds within itself the resources to mount a defence from within the humanities of political violence and by extension an overt justification of the death penalty. Slavoj Žižek's essay on Robespierre is unpicked as one such representative text. It is contrasted (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  12
    Contractualism and the Death Penalty.Li Hon-Lam - 2017 - Criminal Justice Ethics 36 (2):152-182.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50.  86
    Is the Death Penalty Irrevocable?Michael Davis - 1984 - Social Theory and Practice 10 (2):143-156.
1 — 50 / 1000