Results for 'corporate social performance'

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  1. Corporate social performance and attractiveness as an employer to different job seeking populations.Heather Schmidt Albinger & Sarah J. Freeman - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 28 (3):243 - 253.
    This study investigates the hypothesis that the advantage corporate social performance (CSP) yields in attracting human resources depends on the degree of job choice possessed by the job seeking population. Results indicate that organizational CSP is positively related to employer attractiveness for job seekers with high levels of job choice but not related for populations with low levels suggesting advantages to firms with high levels of CSP in the ability to attract the most qualified employees.
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  2.  51
    How corporate social performance is institutionalised within the governance structure.Frank J. de Graaf & Cor A. J. Herkströter - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (2):177-189.
    Since Ackerman in Corporate social responsiveness, the modern dilemma (1973), pleaded for the institutionalisation of corporate social performance (CSP) in business processes, researchers have focused on the role of strategy in CSP. This article demonstrates that CSP is institutionalised within the governance structure. We will attempt to make this clear by means of a description of the Dutch system of corporate governance. Under certain circumstances Dutch companies are already bound to CSP due to prevailing (...)
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  3.  59
    Corporate Social Performance as a Business Strategy.Nikolay A. Dentchev - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):395-410.
    Having the ambition to contribute to the practical value of the theory on corporate social performance (CSP), this paper approaches the question whether CSP can contribute to the competitive advantage of firms. We adopted an explorative case-study methodology to explore the variety of positive and negative effects of CSP on the competitiveness of organizations. As this study aimed at identifying as great variety of these effects as possible, we selected a diversified group of respondents. Data was thus (...)
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  4.  26
    Corporate Social Performance and Geographical Diversification.Stephen Brammer, Stephen Pavelin & Lynda Porter - 2005 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:81-86.
    This paper investigates an under-researched relationship, that between corporate social performance (CSP) and geographical diversification. Drawingupon the institutional and stakeholder perspectives and utilising data on a sample of large UK firms, we develop a set of empirical models of CSP, and findevidence of a significant contemporaneous positive relationship between the two for some types of social performance and in some regions of the world. Overall,we provide evidence that firms shape their social performance strategies (...)
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  5. The Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance Debate.John F. Mahon - 1997 - Business and Society 36 (1):5-31.
    This article extends earlier research concerning the relationship between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance, with particular emphasis on methodological inconsistencies. Research in this area is extended in three critical areas. First, it focuses on a particular industry, the chemical industry. Second, it uses multiple sources of data-two that are perceptual based (KLD Index and Fortune reputation survey), and two that are performance based (TRI database and corporate philanthropy) in order to triangulate (...)
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  6. The Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance Debate.Jennifer J. Griffin & John F. Mahon - 1997 - Business and Society 36 (1):5-31.
    This article extends earlier research concerning the relationship between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance, with particular emphasis on methodological inconsistencies. Research in this area is extended in three critical areas. First, it focuses on a particular industry, the chemical industry. Second, it uses multiple sources of data-two that are perceptual based (KLD Index and Fortune reputation survey), and two that are performance based (TRI database and corporate philanthropy) in order to triangulate (...)
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  7.  71
    Corporate Social Performance, Firm Size, and Organizational Visibility: Distinct and Joint Effects on Voluntary Sustainability Reporting.Sascha Raithel & Philipp Schreck - 2018 - Business and Society 57 (4):742-778.
    This study investigates the distinct and joint effects of corporate social performance, firm size, and visibility on a company’s decision to disclose sustainability-related information through sustainability reports. It seeks to provide more nuanced explanations for why certain companies tend to extensively report on their sustainability performance. First, while prior studies have predominantly focused on environmental reporting, the current analysis considers comprehensive sustainability reports that include both environmental and social issues. Second, the article argues that the (...)
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  8.  95
    Measuring Corporate Social Performance in France: A Critical and Empirical Analysis of ARESE Data.Jacques Igalens & Jean-Pascal Gond - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 56 (2):131-148.
    This article studies the idea of Corporate Social Performance (CSP) from a critical perspective using empirical elements derived from analysis of year 2000 ARESE data. ARESE is the French first mover social rating agency providing quantified data about the Social Performance of French companies. The paper starts out by reviewing leading CSP models and discussing problems inherent to the measurement of this construct before going on to present and analyse ARESE data - whose suitability (...)
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  9.  90
    Corporate Social Performance and Firm Risk: A Meta-Analytic Review.Marc Orlitzky & John D. Benjamin - 2001 - Business and Society 40 (4):369-396.
    Building on earlier work on the relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and a firm’s financial performance, this integrative empirical study supports the theoretical argument that the higher a firm’s CSP the lower its financial risk. Specifically, the relationship between CSP and risk appears to be one of reciprocal causality, because prior CSP is negatively related to subsequent financial risk, and prior financial risk is negatively related to subsequent CSP. Additionally, CSP is more strongly correlated with (...)
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  10.  18
    The Corporate Social Performance of Developing Country Multinationals.Stelios Zyglidopoulos, Peter Williamson & Pavlos Symeou - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (3):379-406.
    ABSTRACT:In this article, we explore the Corporate Social Performance (CSP) of Developing Country Multinationals (DMNCs). We argue that in competing internationally, DMNCs often face both reputation and legitimacy deficits, which they address by improving their CSP. We develop a series of hypotheses to explain the variation in CSP between DMNCs and domestic-only firms from developing countries and also examine variations in CSP between DMNCs depending on the extent of their multinationality and portfolio of host countries. Our findings (...)
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  11. Corporate Social Performance in China: Evidence from Large Companies.Yongqiang Gao - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):23-35.
    Based on a contest analysis of the official websites of top 100 companies in China in 2007, the paper reports the social performance of large Chinese companies. We try to focus on and answer the following three questions about CSP of large companies in China: (1) how is their overall social performance?; (2) what are the social issues they addressed?; and (3) what are the stakeholders they addressed? The results are also compared among different ownership (...)
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  12.  43
    Corporate Social Performance and Financial Performance: Sample-Selection Issues.Mark P. Sharfman & Ali M. Shahzad - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (6):889-918.
    The vast majority of extant empirical research examining the relationship between corporate social performance and financial performance selects samples of only those firms which are observed engaging in CSP. In this study, the authors assert that firms’ efforts to pursue CSP and subsequently their appearance in social-choice investment advisory firms’ ranking databases are non-random. Studying the CSP–FP link using selected samples of only those firms whose social performance is ranked by SIA firms introduces (...)
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  13. Corporate social performance and stakeholder thinking: the work and influence of Max BE Clarkson.Archie B. Carroll - 1999 - Business and Society 38 (1):15.
     
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  14.  23
    Corporate Social Performance and the Governance Structure.Frank Jan de Graaf - 2005 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:225-229.
    This paper demonstrates the role of the governance system and the governance structure in corporate social performance (CSP). By building on a longitudinal study in Dutch finance, it extends the CSP-model of Wood. The extension enables us to study the impact of the institutional environment and the characteristics of a governance structure on CSP. Furthermore, the study confirms Wood’s assumption that anticipating managers are critical in CSP. However, if stakeholders desire structural influence, the governance structure and the (...)
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  15.  92
    Corporate social performance, stakeholder orientation, and organizational moral development.Jeanne M. Logsdon & Kristi Yuthas - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (12-13):1213-1226.
    This article begins with an explanation of how moral development for organizations has parallels to Kohlberg's categorization of the levels of individual moral development. Then the levels of organizational moral development are integrated into the literature on corporate social performance by relating them to different stakeholder orientations. Finally, the authors propose a model of organizational moral development that emphasizes the role of top management in creating organizational processes that shape the organizational and institutional components of corporate (...)
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  16.  8
    The Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance Debate.Jennifer J. Griffin & John F. Mahon - 1997 - Business and Society 36 (1):5-31.
    This article extends earlier research concerning the relationship between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance, with particular emphasis on methodological inconsistencies. Research in this area is extended in three critical areas. First, it focuses on a particular industry, the chemical industry. Second, it uses multiple sources of data-two that are perceptual based (KLD Index and Fortune reputation survey), and two that are performance based (TRI database and corporate philanthropy) in order to triangulate (...)
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  17.  30
    Corporate Social Performance: Research Directions for the 21st Century.Jennifer J. Griffin - 2000 - Business and Society 39 (4):479-491.
    Rowley and Berman (2000) are tackling the right questions in their article. Three critical questions, in essence, are asked: What is corporate social performance (CSP)? What does it mean (i.e., CSP measures)? And, where does the future lie with CSP? In answering these questions, they are creating a CSP research agenda for the 21st Century. While agreeing, to a large extent, with their new set of questions, this paper questions their rationale for what is currently wrong with (...)
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  18. Corporate social performance as a competitive advantage in attracting a quality workforce.Daniel W. Greening & Daniel B. Turban - 2000 - Business and Society 39 (3):254-280.
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  19. The Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance Debate: 25 Years ofIncomparable ReseaarchJ.J. Griffin & Mahon John - 1997 - Business and Society 1:73-75.
     
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  20.  47
    Do Corporate Social Performance Targets in Executive Compensation Contribute to Corporate Social Performance?Karen Maas - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (3):573-585.
    To deal with potential conflicts between the triple-bottom-line expectations of investors and the performance of executives, firms can use incentives by integrating corporate social performance targets into executive compensation. No evidence yet exists that CSP targets in executive compensation actually lead to an improvement of CSP results. Using a panel data set of 400 firms for the years 2008–2012 leading to 1846 firm-year observations, the relationships between CSP targets and CSP results and CSP improvements are analyzed. (...)
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  21.  67
    The Corporate Social Performance Content of Innovation in the U.K.Stephen Pavelin & Lynda A. Porter - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):711-725.
    This article investigates the influence of innovation on the relationship between corporate strategy and social issues. Specifically, we employ firm-level data for a large sample of U.K. companies drawn from a diverse range of industrial sectors to investigate, given innovation, the determinants of both the probability that the innovation brings reduced environmental impacts and/or improved health and safety, and the strength of this effect. In this connection, we find evidence of a dichotomy between product and process innovations, and (...)
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  22.  32
    Corporate Social Performance of Family Firms: A Place-Based Perspective in the Context of Layoffs.Kihun Kim, Zulfiquer Ali Haider, Zhenyu Wu & Junsheng Dou - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (2):235-252.
    This paper investigates the layoff behavior, a typical people dimension of corporate social performance, of family firms from a place-based perspective. We theorize that a place-based culture within family firms ensures that all organizational members share a deep sense of connection with the place of operations which makes them inherently care about their impact on society. Using data on layoffs of 2000 largest US firms between 1994 and 2007, we find that family firms do indeed exhibit a (...)
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  23.  77
    The Impact of Corporate Social Performance on a Firm’s Multinationality.Cyril Bouquet & Yuval Deutsch - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):755 - 769.
    Using panel data of 4,244 company years, we examine whether and how corporate social performance (CSP) affects a firm’s capacity to achieve profitable sales in foreign markets. Based on our extension of instrumental stakeholder theory into the international arena, we hypothesized a U-shaped relationship between CSP and multinationality. Results supported our contention that multinational enterprises (MNEs) need to be substantially committed to social performance objectives if they are to recoup the cost of their CSP investments, (...)
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  24.  30
    Corporate Social Performance and Economic Cycles.Jeffrey S. Harrison & Shawn L. Berman - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (2):279-294.
    Do firms respond to changes in economic growth by altering their corporate social responsibility programs? If they do respond, are their responses simply neglect of areas associated with corporate social performance or do they also cut back on positive programs such as profit sharing, public/private housing programs, or charitable contributions? In this paper, we argue that because CSP-related actions and programs tend to be discretionary, they are likely to receive less attention during tough economic times, (...)
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  25.  30
    Corporate Social Performance: Business Rationale, Competitiveness Threats, and Management Challenges.Nikolay A. Dentchev - 2007 - Business and Society 46 (1):104.
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  26.  24
    Corporate Social Performance: A Review of Empirical Research Examining the Corporation–Society Relationship Using Kinder, Lydenberg, Domini Social Ratings Data. [REVIEW]James E. Mattingly - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (6):796-839.
    This article reviews empirical research of corporate social performance using Kinder, Lydenberg, Domini social ratings data through 2011. The review synthesizes 100 empirical studies, noting consistencies and inconsistencies among studies examining similar constructs. Notable consistencies were that, although accounting measures of financial performance were a positive outcome of CSP, the same was not often true of stock returns. Also, demographics of top management teams increased CSP strengths, but did not reduce concerns, whereas organizational decentralization reduced (...)
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  27.  43
    Regulating Corporate Social Performance.David Hess - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (2):307-330.
    Traditional approaches to regulating corporate behavior have not, and cannot, produce socially responsible corporations.Although many of the problems with these approaches were identified twenty-five years ago by Christopher Stone, an effective regulatory system still has not been implemented. A model of regulation is needed that is flexible enough to accommodate the variety of contexts in which corporations operate, but also makes corporations responsive to the ever-changing societal expectations of propercorporate behavior. To accomplish these goals, a reflexive law regulatory system (...)
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  28.  53
    Regulating Corporate Social Performance.David Hess - 2001 - Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (2):307-330.
    Traditional approaches to regulating corporate behavior have not, and cannot, produce socially responsible corporations.Although many of the problems with these approaches were identified twenty-five years ago by Christopher Stone, an effective regulatory system still has not been implemented. A model of regulation is needed that is flexible enough to accommodate the variety of contexts in which corporations operate, but also makes corporations responsive to the ever-changing societal expectations of propercorporate behavior. To accomplish these goals, a reflexive law regulatory system (...)
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  29. Corporate Charitable Contributions: A Corporate Social Performance or Legitimacy Strategy?Jennifer C. Chen, Dennis M. Patten & Robin W. Roberts - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):131-144.
    This study examines the relation between firms' corporate philanthropic giving and their performance in three other social domains - employee relations, environmental issues, and product safety. Based on a sample of 384 U.S. companies and using data pooled from 1998 through 2000, we find that worse performers in the other social areas are both more likely to make charitable contributions and that the extent of their giving is larger than for better performers. Analyses of each separate (...)
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  30.  74
    Causality Between Corporate Social Performance and Financial Performance: Evidence from Canadian Firms.Rim Makni, Claude Francoeur & François Bellavance - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):409-422.
    This study assesses the causal relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and financial performance (FP). We perform our empirical analyses on a sample of 179 publicly held Canadian firms and use the measures of CSP provided by Canadian Social Investment Database for the years 2004 and 2005. Using the “Granger causality” approach, we find no significant relationship between a composite measure of a firm’s CSP and FP, except for market returns. However, using individual measures of (...)
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  31.  30
    Corporate social performance as a bottom line for consumers.May-May Meijer & Theo Schuyt - 2005 - Business and Society 44 (4):442-461.
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  32.  35
    Modeling Corporate Social Performance and Job Pursuit Intention: Mediating Mechanisms of Corporate Reputation and Job Advancement Prospects. [REVIEW]Rong-Tsu Wang - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):569-582.
    An important issue for successful recruitment is to increase the pursuit intention of job seekers. This study discusses such issue by proposing a research model based on the signaling theory and the expectancy theory. In the model, this study hypothesizes that the perceived corporate social performance of job seekers positively affects their job pursuit intention and recommendation intention indirectly via the mediation of corporate reputation and job advancement prospects. The proposed hypotheses of this research are empirically (...)
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  33.  58
    High-Performance Work Systems, Corporate Social Performance and Employee Outcomes: Exploring the Missing Links.Mingqiong Zhang, David Di Fan & Cherrie Jiuhua Zhu - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (3):423-435.
    High-performance work systems -performance research has dominated innovative human resource management studies for two decades. However, mainstream HPWS research has paid little attention to employees’ perceptions of HPWS, or to the relationship between HPWS and corporate social performance. The influence of CSP on employee outcomes such as organizational commitment and organizational citizenship behaviour has thus been similarly neglected. This paper seeks to investigate these missing links in literature using data collected from a sample of 700 (...)
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  34.  25
    Measuring Corporate Social Performance.Julio Sesma, Bryan W. Husted & Jerry Banks - 2012 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 23:78-89.
    Corporate social performance (CSP) has been studied extensively by business and society scholars, yet most approaches to its measurement continue to be ambiguous, controversial and difficult to use (Wood, 2010). In this paper, we propose measuring CSP via the construct of stakeholder satisfaction through social media like Facebook and Twitter. We argue that the satisfaction of stakeholder expectations can be explained with organizational justice theory particularly in the exercise of voice by stakeholders when they perceive unjust (...)
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  35. CEO incentives and corporate social performance.Jean McGuire, Sandra Dow & Kamal Argheyd - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 45 (4):341 - 359.
    This paper examines the relationship between CEO incentives and strong and weak corporate social performance. Using the KLD database we find that incentives have no significant relationship with strong social performance. Salary and long-term incentives have a positive association with weak social performance.
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  36.  49
    Do Suppliers Applaud Corporate Social Performance?Min Zhang, Lijun Ma, Jun Su & Wen Zhang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (4):543-557.
    The influence of corporate social performance on stakeholders is one of the focal issues in corporate social responsibility research. Using data of listed companies in China, this paper examines whether CSR behavior in the form of charitable donations garners a positive reaction from suppliers. Results derived from both level and change model regressions show that superior CSP makes it easier for a firm to obtain trade credit from suppliers, although the effect is significant only in (...)
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  37.  28
    Corporate Social Performance in Family Firms.Sara A. Morris - 2005 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:154-159.
    This is an exploratory study of corporate social performance in firms with family members in executive, governance, or strong ownership positions. Family firmsdominate the economy in most countries, including the United States, and families are thought to be more concerned with personal wealth creation and risk avoidance than social performance. Although such firms have been shown to have superior financial performance, I found no evidence of superior (or inferior) social performance among family (...)
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  38.  12
    Corporate Social Performance.Niklas Egels & Olof Zaring - 2005 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 16:105-111.
    This paper develops an empirically grounded, processual view of corporate social performance (CSP) by analyzing how internal organizational processes affect a firm’s social performance. Based on two case studies, we argue that changes in a firm’s social performance are triggered by continuously reoccurring instances of poor fit between the firm’s routines and its institutional environment. We propose that reactive change processes, initiated by stakeholder critique threatening the organization’s legitimacy, will result in isomorphic type (...)
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  39. The Effect of Corporate Social Performance on Financial Performance: The Moderating Effect of Ownership Concentration.Chih-Wei Peng & Mei-Ling Yang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (1):171-182.
    The purpose of this study is to extend prior research on this topic by investigating whether the impact of ownership concentration moderates the link between corporate social performance and financial performance. This study uses a set of unique, hand-collected pollution control data to measure CSP, based on a sample of Taiwanese listed companies during the period from 1996 to 2006. The results of the empirical analysis provide firm support for the idea that the divergence between control (...)
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  40.  26
    Corporate Charitable Contributions: A Corporate Social Performance or Legitimacy Strategy?Jennifer C. Chen, Dennis M. Patten & Robin Roberts - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):131-144.
    This study examines the relation between firms’ corporate philanthropic giving and their performance in three other social domains – employee relations, environmental issues, and product safety. Based on a sample of 384 U.S. companies and using data pooled from 1998 through 2000, we find that worse performers in the other social areas are both more likely to make charitable contributions and that the extent of their giving is larger than for better performers. Analyses of each separate (...)
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  41.  37
    Corporate Social Performance Profiling.Steven L. Wartick & John F. Mahon - 2009 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:326-336.
    Over time, how does a company's corporate social performance (CSP) as reflected through different stakeholders' views of the company (corporate reputation or CR) vary between a financial stakeholder group and a customer stakeholder group? The purpose of this research is to extend our previous work in the area of CSP profiling. So far, we have only applied the method to two companies in each of three industries for one year. This paper will focus on extending the (...)
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  42.  17
    Corporate Social Performance and the Likelihood of Bankruptcy: Evidence from a Period of Economic Upswing.Florian Habermann & Felix Bernhard Fischer - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 182 (1):243-259.
    The paper aims to investigate the effects of corporate social performance (CSP) on bankruptcy likelihood in times of economic upswing. This is important because prior related literature focused on data containing times of economic crises. We measure bankruptcy likelihood with the Altman Z score and CSP with Refinitiv ESG scores. By applying static panel data regressions and instrumental variable regressions on a sample of 6696 US-firm-year observations from 2010 to 2019 our main findings are: (i) In contrast (...)
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  43.  49
    Exploringthe Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Employer Attractiveness.Kristin B. Backhaus, Brett A. Stone & Karl Heiner - 2002 - Business and Society 41 (3):292-318.
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  44. The Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance and Corporate Financial Performance in the Banking Sector.Maria-Gaia Soana - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):133-148.
    Since the 1970s, many Anglo-American studies have investigated the theme of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its costs and benefits. Most studies have tried to test, largely in samples of multiple industries, the relationship between corporate social performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP). These analyses, however, have produced conflicting results and any attempt to give a generalized and coherent conclusion has proved inadequate. This article examines the ways CSP can be proxied and (...)
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  45.  71
    Corporate Social Performance and Innovation with High Social Benefits: A Quantitative Analysis. [REVIEW]Marcus Wagner - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):581 - 594.
    This article analyses the link between innovation with high social benefits and corporate social performance (CSP) and the role that family firms play in this. This theme is particularly relevant given the large number of firms that are family-owned. Also the implicit potential of innovation to reconcile corporate sustainability aspects with profitability justifies an extended analysis of this link. Governments often support socially beneficial innovation with various policy instruments, with the intention of increasing international competitiveness (...)
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  46.  47
    Corporate Social Performance, Firm Valuation, and Industrial Difference: Evidence from Hong Kong. [REVIEW]Yan-Leung Cheung, Kun Jiang, Billy S. C. Mak & Weiqiang Tan - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (4):625-631.
    This study addresses two issues. First, does corporate social performance matter in Hong Kong. Second, if yes, is it relevant to some industries more than others. To answer these questions, we develop a corporate social performance index (CSP) to measure the quality of corporate social performance of major Hong Kong listed firms. The criteria are based on the OECD Principles of Corporate Governance. Using the 3-year period from 2002 to 2005, (...)
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  47.  13
    The Impact of Corporate Social Performance on a Firm’s Multinationality.Cyril Bouquet & Yuval Deutsch - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):755-769.
    Using panel data of 4,244 company years, we examine whether and how corporate social performance affects a firm's capacity to achieve profitable sales in foreign markets. Based on our extension of instrumental stakeholder theory into the international arena, we hypothesized a U-shaped relationship between CSP and multinationality. Results supported our contention that multinational enterprises need to be substantially committed to social performance objectives if they are to recoup the cost of their CSP investments, and improve (...)
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  48.  44
    The Relationship Between Corporate Social Performance, and Organizational Size, Financial Performance, and Environmental Performance: An Empirical Examination.P. A. Stanwick & S. D. Stanwick - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (2):195-204.
    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the corporate social performance of an organization and three variables: the size of the organization, the financial performance of the organization, and the environmental performance of the organization. By empirically testing data from 1987 to 1992, the results of the study show that a firm's corporate social performance is indeed impacted by the size of the firm, the level of profitability of (...)
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  49.  97
    Measuring Corporate Social Performance.José Salazar & Bryan W. Husted - 2008 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:149-161.
    This article argues that one of the principal difficulties in measuring CSR performance lies with the unit of analysis and that its social, environmental and economic impacts need to be examined at a project level. Using a quasi-experimental research approach the paper shows an evaluation of the Patrimonio Hoy (PH) a CSR program of CEMEX, one of the largest cement manufacturers inthe world.
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  50.  42
    Unpacking the Drivers of Corporate Social Performance: A Multilevel, Multistakeholder, and Multimethod Analysis.Marc Orlitzky, Céline Louche, Jean-Pascal Gond & Wendy Chapple - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (1):21-40.
    The question of what drives corporate social performance has become a vital concern for many managers and researchers of large corporations. This study addresses this question by adopting a multilevel, multistakeholder, and multimethod approach to theorize and estimate the relative influence of macro, meso, and micro factors on CSP. Applying three different methods of variance decomposition analysis to an international sample of 2060 large public companies over a time span of 5 years, our results show that firm-level (...)
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