Results for 'corporate community involvement'

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  1.  40
    “Managing” Corporate Community Involvement.Judith M. van der Voort, Katherina Glac & Lucas C. P. M. Meijs - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):311-329.
    In academic research, many attempts have been undertaken to legitimize corporate community involvement by showing a business case for it. However, much less attention has been devoted to building understanding about the actual dynamics and challenges of managing CCI in the business context. As an alternative to existing predominantly static and top-down approaches, this paper introduces a social movement framework for analyzing CCI management. Based on the analysis of qualitative case study data, we argue that the active (...)
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  2.  11
    Corporate Community Involvement: a case for regulatory reform.Sean Hamil - 1999 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 8 (1):14-25.
    The central thesis of this paper is that Corporate Community Involvement (CCI) is not a neutral activity with positive and mutual benefits for all involved. Rather, it is a much more complex activity which may also have negative impacts. Using Donaldson and Preston’s (1995) explanatory model of the stakeholding concept as a framework, this paper explores: (1) the practice of CCI in the UK (with some reference to US experience from which UK firms have drawn extensively), (2) (...)
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  3.  25
    Corporate community involvement in the UK - investment or atonement?Geoff Moore - 1995 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 4 (3):171–178.
  4.  11
    Corporate Community Involvement in the UK - Investment or Atonement?Geoff Moore - 1995 - Business Ethics: A European Review 4 (3):171-178.
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  5.  26
    Corporate Community Involvment in Turkey: New Survey Evidenece.Bilge Uyan-Atay, Stephen Brammer & Andrew Millington - 2008 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:256-268.
    In this paper we provide the first comprehensive insight into corporate community involvement activities of companies in Turkey. Drawing upon an extensive database compiled from corporate websites and archive documents in addition to a primary survey of 77 of Turkey’s largest companies, we examine the pattern of corporate community activities in Turkey and juxtapose these against existing evidence for other countries and distinctive elements of Turkey’s institutional environment. Our analysis highlights the historical role played (...)
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  6.  27
    Christian Religiosity and Corporate Community Involvement.Jinhua Cui, Hoje Jo & Manuel G. Velasquez - 2019 - Business Ethics Quarterly 29 (1):85-125.
    ABSTRACT:We examine whether religion influences company decisions related to corporate community involvement. Employing a large US sample, we show that the CCI initiatives of a company are positively associated with the level of Christian religiosity present in the region within which that company’s headquarters is located. This association persists even after we control for a wide range of firm characteristics and after we subject our results to several econometric tests. These results support our religious morality hypothesis which (...)
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  7. Corporate Community Involvement in the UK ‐ Investment or Atonement?Geoff Moore - 1995 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 4 (3):171-178.
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  8.  18
    Corporate Community Involvement.Bilge Uyan-Atay - 2011 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 22:339-351.
    Prior research has tended to focus on the influences upon how much organizations contribute to charitable or community cases paying relatively little attentionto the recipients of these donations or how firms develop preferences in respect of them. This study, in order to fill these gaps in the literature, focuses on two main aspects of CCI within 500 biggest companies situated in Turkey. Firstly, it aims to explore how companies manage their CCI activities. The type and level of the managers (...)
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  9.  33
    Strategic Direction of Corporate Community Involvement.Gordon Liu, Teck-Yong Eng & Wai-Wai Ko - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):469-487.
    Previous research on corporate community involvement (CCI) initiatives indicates that such behaviour is critical for building neighbourhood relationships and extending corporate influence in the community, but there is little theoretical work that provides a clear picture of managing the nature of the initiatives from different stakeholder management approaches. Drawing from theoretical insights of stakeholder theory and the concept of social capital, this article proposes nine strategic directions for CCI initiatives, and concludes by discussing the management (...)
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  10.  57
    The Effect of Stakeholder Preferences, Organizational Structure and Industry Type on Corporate Community Involvement.Stephen Brammer & Andrew Millington - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 45 (3):213 - 226.
    This paper analyses the relationships between corporate community involvement activities, the organizational structures within which they are managed, the firm's industry and evolving stakeholder attitudes and preferences in a sample of 148 U.K. based firms who have demonstrated a clear desire to be socially responsible. The research highlights significant associations between the allocation of responsibility for community involvement within the firm, its industry and the extent of its community involvement activities. Consistent with the (...)
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  11.  19
    Shareholders and corporate community involvement in Britain.Julia Clarke - 1997 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 6 (4):201–207.
    Corporate community involvement is attracting increasing interest in Britain, but what do shareholders feel about this use of company assets? This timely survey of top UK corporate donors provides interesting data on current practice and explores the degree to which shareholders are consulted. The author is a member of the Department of Business Studies in the Faculty of Management and Business of The Manchester Metropolitan University, Aytoun Building, Aytoun Street, Manchester M1 3GH; e–mail [email protected].
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  12.  9
    Shareholders and Corporate Community Involvement in Britain.Julia Clarke - 1997 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 6 (4):201-207.
    Corporate community involvement is attracting increasing interest in Britain, but what do shareholders feel about this use of company assets? This timely survey of top UK corporate donors provides interesting data on current practice and explores the degree to which shareholders are consulted. The author is a member of the Department of Business Studies in the Faculty of Management and Business of The Manchester Metropolitan University, Aytoun Building, Aytoun Street, Manchester M1 3GH; e–mail [email protected].
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  13. City and Enterprise: Corporate Community Involvement in European and US Cities. By Leo Van Den Berg, Erik Braun, and Alexander HJ Otgaar.R. Jelier - 2005 - The European Legacy 10 (6):658.
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  14.  53
    An Integrated Approach to Implementing ‹Community Participation’ in Corporate Community Involvement: Lessons from Magadi Soda Company in Kenya.Judy N. Muthuri, Wendy Chapple & Jeremy Moon - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S2):431-444.
    Corporate community involvement is often regarded as means of development in developing countries. However, CCI is often criticised for patronage and insensitivity both to context and local priorities. A key concern is the extent of 'community participation' in corporate social decision-making. Community participation in CCI offers an opportunity for these criticisms to be addressed. This paper presents findings of research examining community participation in CCI governance undertaken by Magadi Soda Company in Kenya. We (...)
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  15.  12
    The Double Edge of Legitimation: The Micro Dynamics in Framing Corporate Community Involvement.Judith van der Voort & Lucas Meijs - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:271-276.
    This article draws on the results of an inductive qualitative study on the microdynamics of framing corporate community involvement. Insight is provided into these dynamics by using the metaphor of a social movement and drawing on that literature’s framing perspective. Based on accounts of diverse organizational members, we identify several double edges in framing CCI as a strategic issue, and we develop a model that helps to understand why and how strategizing CCI may be controversial.
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  16.  10
    Exploring Corporate Community Engagement in Switzerland: Activities, Motivations, and Processes.Theo Wehner, Gian-Claudio Gentile & Christian Lorenz - 2016 - Business and Society 55 (4):594-631.
    This research note presents data concerning the community engagement activities of 2,096 Swiss companies as reported by a single company respondent in an online survey. Switzerland affords an interesting opportunity to compare engagement activities in a single country with multiple culture systems across companies varying in size from large to small and medium enterprises. Study results show that 78% of the surveyed firms pursue some community engagement activities. While engagement is mostly practiced in traditional forms, more active forms (...)
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  17. Corporate social responsibility communication: Stakeholder information, response and involvement strategies.Mette Morsing & Majken Schultz - 2006 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 15 (4):323–338.
    While it is generally agreed that companies need to manage their relationships with their stakeholders, the way in which they choose to do so varies considerably. In this paper, it is argued that when companies want to communicate with stakeholders about their CSR initiatives, they need to involve those stakeholders in a two-way communication process, defined as an ongoing iterative sense-giving and sense-making process. The paper also argues that companies need to communicate through carefully crafted and increasingly sophisticated processes. Three (...)
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  18.  31
    Corporate social responsibility communication: stakeholder information, response and involvement strategies.Mette Morsing & Majken Schultz - 2006 - Business Ethics 15 (4):323-338.
    While it is generally agreed that companies need to manage their relationships with their stakeholders, the way in which they choose to do so varies considerably. In this paper, it is argued that when companies want to communicate with stakeholders about their CSR initiatives, they need to involve those stakeholders in a two-way communication process, defined as an ongoing iterative sense-giving and sense-making process. The paper also argues that companies need to communicate through carefully crafted and increasingly sophisticated processes. Three (...)
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  19.  21
    CEO letters: Social license to operate and community involvement in the mining industry.Blanca de‐Miguel‐Molina, Vicente Chirivella‐González & Beatriz García‐Ortega - 2018 - Business Ethics: A European Review 28 (1):36-55.
    This paper aims to analyse how the discourse of CEO letters and other factors influence community involvement and Social Licence to Operate (SLO) in the mining industry. The analysis is based on qualitative information disclosed in sustainability reports and CEO letters from 32 mining firms. Content analysis was undertaken to obtain data for the study, and then a regression analysis and a multiple correspondence analysis were used to test the hypotheses defined in the study. The results indicate that (...)
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  20.  25
    Communicating Corporate Social Responsibility: External Stakeholder Involvement, Productivity and Firm Performance.Jing Yang & Kelly Basile - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (2):501-517.
    Assessing the impact of CSR initiatives can be a complex task for marketers given the variety of methods of communicating about CSR as well as the broad range of stakeholders that CSR initiatives might interest. Social media helps increase the visibility and credibility of CSR communication and provides new ways of reaching and involving stakeholders in CSR initiatives. Using data collected and coded from Facebook pages of the Top 100 Global Brands, the authors introduce a new measure of effectiveness for (...)
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  21.  26
    CEO letters: Social license to operate and community involvement in the mining industry.Blanca de-Miguel-Molina, Vicente Chirivella-González & Beatriz García-Ortega - 2018 - Business Ethics 28 (1):36-55.
    This paper aims to analyse how the discourse of CEO letters and other factors influence community involvement and Social Licence to Operate (SLO) in the mining industry. The analysis is based on qualitative information disclosed in sustainability reports and CEO letters from 32 mining firms. Content analysis was undertaken to obtain data for the study, and then a regression analysis and a multiple correspondence analysis were used to test the hypotheses defined in the study. The results indicate that (...)
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  22.  30
    Social Investment through Community Enterprise: The Case of Multinational Corporations Involvement in the Development of Nigerian Water Resources.Emeka Nwankwo, Nelson Phillips & Paul Tracey - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (1):91-101.
    This paper examines the different mechanisms used by multinational corporations (MNCs) in Nigeria seeking to make long-term social investments by meeting the critical challenge of improving water provision. Community enterprise – an increasingly common form of social enterprise, which pursues charitable objectives through business activities – may be the most effective mechanism for building local capacity in a sustainable and accountable way. Traditionally, social investments by MNCs have involved either donations to a charity, which then assumes responsibility for delivering (...)
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  23. Corporate Involvement in Community Economic Development The Role of US Business Education.Donna J. Wood, Kimberly S. Davenport, Laquita C. Blockson & Harry J. Van Buren - 2002 - Business and Society 41 (2):208-241.
     
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  24. Corporate Legitimacy as Deliberation: A Communicative Framework.Guido Palazzo & Andreas Georg Scherer - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (1):71-88.
    Modern society is challenged by a loss of efficiency in national governance systems values, and lifestyles. Corporate social responsibility (CSR) discourse builds upon a conception of organizational legitimacy that does not appropriately reflect these changes. The problems arise from the a-political role of the corporation in the concepts of cognitive and pragmatic legitimacy, which are based on compliance to national law and on relatively homogeneous and stable societal expectations on the one hand and widely accepted rhetoric assuming that all (...)
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  25.  98
    Corporate philanthropy in the U.k. 1985–2000 some empirical findings.David Campbell, Geoff Moore & Matthias Metzger - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):29 - 41.
    This paper briefly reviews the theories that seek to explain the phenomenon of corporate charitable donations and then provides a review of the empirical issues that have arisen in previous studies in this area. The findings of an analysis of charitable donations data from the entire U.K. FTSE index for the years 1985–2000 are then reported. These findings include the observation of a time-related increase in charitable donations, which is compared with an earlier study to give a 24 year (...)
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  26.  73
    Beyond Philanthropy: Community Enterprise as a Basis for Corporate Citizenship.Paul Tracey, Nelson Phillips & Helen Haugh - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (4):327-344.
    In this article we argue that the emergence of a new form of organization – community enterprise – provides an alternative mechanism for corporations to behave in socially responsible ways. Community enterprises are distinguished from other third sector organisations by their generation of income through trading, rather than philanthropy and/or government subsidy, to finance their social goals. They also include democratic governance structures which allow members of the community or constituency they serve to participate in the management (...)
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  27.  50
    Ethics, Power and Communities: Corporate Social Responsibility Revisited.Denise Kleinrichert - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):475-485.
    Ally-building can be an ethical pursuit in developing sources of power for the business manager. The commitment to social responsibility is a source of power, as well as an ethical practice for corporate endeavors. Pfeffer promotes a business manager's ability to develop effectiveness with ties to powerful others in an intra-organizational environment. This paper advances an analysis about how individuals in corporations may use an inter-organizational approach to developing sources of power through a notion of corporate social responsibility. (...)
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  28.  20
    Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility in Latin American Communities.Roberto Gutiérrez & Audra Jones - 2005 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 2:303-328.
    Five different Latin American experiences help us to understand the impacts of corporate social responsibility on communities. We focus on communities composed of low-income populations to compare types of interventions, their main characteristics, spaces for community participation, and some results and impacts. Some of the findings indicate that (a) a company’s enlightened self-interest in its CSR program ensures its commitment to the program and the program’s sustainability; (b) community involvement from the outset in defining a project (...)
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  29.  6
    The role of Corporate Social Responsibility in Organisational Identity Communication, Co-Creation and Orientation.Mohamed Karim Sorour, Mark Boadu & Teerooven Soobaroyen - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (1):89-108.
    Corporate social responsibility research has mainly focused on understanding the antecedents and outcomes of CSR adoption. Yet, little is known about the organisational process of ‘CSR engagement’ and how this would affect organisational identity. We mobilise Basu and Palazzo’s cognitive and linguistic notions of sense-making and Brickson’s organisational identity orientation to frame how rural community banks in Ghana engage with CSR. Drawing from semi-structured interviews with RCB directors, managers and other stakeholders, we conceive of the CSR engagement process (...)
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  30.  66
    The Value of Corporate Philanthropy During Times of Crisis: The Sensegiving Effect of Employee Involvement[REVIEW]Alan Muller & Roman Kräussl - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 103 (2):203-220.
    Recent research suggests that philanthropy’s value to the firm is largely mediated by contextual factors such as managers’ assumed motives for charity. Our article extends this contingency perspective using a “sensegiving” lens, by which external actors’ interpretations of organizational actions may be influenced by the way in which the organization communicates about those actions. We consider how sensegiving features in philanthropy-related press releases affect whether investors value those donation decisions. For the empirical investigation in this study, we analyze abnormal returns (...)
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  31.  1
    Towards an Ethics of Community: Negotiations of Difference in a Pluralist Society.James Olthuis & Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion (eds.) - 2006 - Wilfrid Laurier Press.
    How do we deal with difference personally, interpersonally, nationally? Can we weave a cohesive social fabric in a religiously plural society without suppressing differences? This collection of significant essays suggests that to truly honour differences in matters of faith and religion we must publicly exercise and celebrate them. The secular/sacred, public/private divisions long considered sacred in the West need to be dismantled if Canada (or any nation state) is to develop a genuine mosaic that embraces fundamental differences instead of a (...)
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  32.  34
    Transparency of Corporate Social Responsibility in Dutch Breweries.Lizet Quaak, Theo Aalbers & John Goedee - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (3):293-308.
    According to the Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs (2001), transparency by means of Sustainability Reporting should lead to better Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) performance of companies. Sustainability Reporting should also give consumers the information they need to purchase the most sustainable products available (Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs, 2004). This article analyses the driving factors influencing CSR and Sustainability Reporting at seven breweries in the Netherlands. It also gives a better understanding of organizational behaviour with reference to CSR and (...)
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  33.  66
    Corporate Social Responsibility in the Blogosphere.Christian Fieseler, Matthes Fleck & Miriam Meckel - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 91 (4):599-614.
    This paper uses social network analysis to examine the interaction between corporate blogs devoted to sustainability issues and the blogosphere, a clustered online network of collaborative actors. By analyzing the structural embeddedness of a prototypical blog in a virtual community, we show the potential of online platforms to document corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities and to engage with an increasingly socially and ecologically aware stakeholder base. The results of this study show that stakeholder involvement via sustainability (...)
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  34.  46
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Investment Efficiency.Mohammed Benlemlih & Mohammad Bitar - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 148 (3):647-671.
    Using a sample of 21,030 US firm-year observations that represents more than 3000 individual firms over the 1998–2012 period, we investigate the relationship between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and investment efficiency. We provide strong and robust evidence that high CSR involvement decreases investment inefficiency and consequently increases investment efficiency. This result is consistent with our expectations that high CSR firms enjoy low information asymmetry and high stakeholder solidarity (stakeholder theory). Moreover, our findings suggest that CSR components that are (...)
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  35.  27
    The use of corporate social disclosures in the management of reputation and legitimacy: A cross sectoral analysis of UK top 100 companies.Julia Clarke & Monica Gibson-Sweet - 1999 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 8 (1):5–13.
    Recent years have witnessed an escalation in corporate social reporting (CSR) by UK companies (Gray, Kouhy and Lavers 1995). Whilst some elements of CSR reporting are required by law, much of it represents voluntary reporting. By investigating the non‐mandatory reporting of two aspects of social responsibility, corporate community involvement (CCI) and environmental impact, this paper seeks to explore why companies choose to make such disclosures. It specifically asks whether companies are primarily motivated by the strategic need (...)
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  36.  21
    The use of corporate social disclosures in the management of reputation and legitimacy: a cross sectoral analysis of UK Top 100 Companies.Julia Clarke & Monica Gibson-Sweet - 1999 - Business Ethics 8 (1):5-13.
    Recent years have witnessed an escalation in corporate social reporting (CSR) by UK companies (Gray, Kouhy and Lavers 1995). Whilst some elements of CSR reporting are required by law, much of it represents voluntary reporting. By investigating the non‐mandatory reporting of two aspects of social responsibility, corporate community involvement (CCI) and environmental impact, this paper seeks to explore why companies choose to make such disclosures. It specifically asks whether companies are primarily motivated by the strategic need (...)
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  37.  7
    Hybrid innovation: The dynamics of collaboration between the FLOSS community and corporations.Yuwei Lin - 2006 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 18 (4):86-100.
    Unlike innovation based on a strong professional culture involving close collaboration between professionals in academia and/or corporations, the current Free/Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS) development entails a global knowledge network, which consists of 1) a heterogeneous community of individuals and organizations who do not necessarily have professional backgrounds in computer science but have developed the competency to understand programming and working in a public domain; 2) corporations. This paper describes the operation of the hybrid form of developing and implementing (...)
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  38.  38
    Corporate Social Responsibilities: Alternative Perspectives About the Need to Legislate.Craig Deegan & Marita Shelly - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (4):499-526.
    This research involves a review of the submissions to a 2005/06 Australian Government Inquiry into Corporate Social Responsibility. The Inquiry was established to investigate whether corporate social responsibilities and accountabilities should be regulated, or left to be determined by market forces. Our results show that the business community overwhelming favour an anti-regulation approach whereby corporations should be left with the flexibility to determine their social responsibilities and associated accountabilities and ‘enlightened self-interest’ should be retained as the guiding (...)
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  39.  45
    Corporate Social Responsibility in SMEs: A Shift from Philanthropy to Institutional Works?Kenneth Amaeshi, Emmanuel Adegbite, Chris Ogbechie, Uwafiokun Idemudia, Konan Anderson Seny Kan, Mabumba Issa & Obianuju I. J. Anakwue - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 138 (2):385-400.
    Corporate Social Responsibility amongst Small and Medium Enterprises is often characterised in the literature as unstructured, informal and ad hoc discretionary philanthropic activities. Drawing insights from recent theoretical/analytical frameworks :52–78, 2010), and on empirical data collected from both Nigeria and Tanzania, we found that CSR practices in SMEs are much more nuanced than previously presented. In addition, SMEs undertake their CSR practices to varying degrees in multiple spaces—i.e. the workplace, marketplace, community and the ecological environment. These CSR practices (...)
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  40.  47
    Anti-Corporate Anger as a Form of Care-Based Moral Agency.Sheldene Simola - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (S2):255 - 269.
    Conventional management strategies for anti-corporate anger involve its negative construal as an inappropriate irrationality in need of containment. An alternative account is offered in which such anger comprises a healthy and health-sustaining component of care-based moral agency directed not only toward the affiliative advancement of connection among community members, but also toward the (political) resistance to violation, injustice, and carelessness through which disconnection from responsive community relationships occurs. The role of anger in care-based moral agency is demonstrated (...)
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  41.  23
    Board Diversity and Corporate Social Responsibility: Empirical Evidence from France.Rania Beji, Ouidad Yousfi, Nadia Loukil & Abdelwahed Omri - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 173 (1):133-155.
    This study analyzes how the board’s characteristics could be associated with globally corporate social responsibility CSR and specific areas of CSR. It is drawn on all listed firms, in 2016, on the SBF120 between 2003 and 2016. Our results provide strong evidence that diversity in boards and diversity of boards globally are positively associated with corporate social performance. However, they influence differently specific dimensions of CSR performance. First, we show that large boards are positively associated with all areas (...)
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  42.  64
    Corporate dynamic transparency: The new ict-driven ethics? [REVIEW]Antonino Vaccaro & Peter Madsen - 2009 - Ethics and Information Technology 11 (2):113-122.
    The term “corporate transparency” is frequently used in scholarly discussions of business ethics and corporate social responsibility (CSR); however, it remains a volatile and imprecise term, often defined incompletely as “information disclosure” accomplished through standardized reporting. Based on the results of empirical studies of organizational behaviors, this paper identifies a new set of managerial practices based on the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) and particularly Internet-based tools. These practices are resulting in what can be termed “dynamic (...)
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  43.  53
    Corporate identity of a socially responsible university – a case from the turkish higher education sector.M. G. Serap Atakan & Tutku Eker - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):55 - 68.
    Facing increased competition, universities are driven to project a positive image to their internal and external stakeholders. Therefore some of these institutions have begun to develop and implement corporate identity programs as part of their corporate strategies. This study describes a Turkish higher education institution’s social responsibility initiatives. Along with this example, the study also analyzes a specific case using concepts from the Corporate Identity and Corporate Social Responsibility literature. The motives leading the university to manage (...)
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  44.  75
    Corporate Ethics, Reputation Management.Joakim Sandberg - 2012 - In Ruth Chadwick (ed.), Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics, 2nd ed. Academic Press.
    Reputation management refers to all the practices employed by corporations aimed at improving the public perception of the corporation. This article outlines the main features of some of the most common points of discussion pertaining to the ethics of reputation management. It introduces the debate on classical forms of corporate communication, or ‘spin-doctoring,’ but also some issues related to more contemporary forms of ‘corporate social responsibility’ management. Finally, it introduces the involvement by stakeholder activists in the battle (...)
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  45.  24
    Corporate Social Responsibility and Growth Opportunity: The Case of Real Estate Investment Trusts.Kevin C. H. Chiang, Gregory J. Wachtel & Xiyu Zhou - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):463-478.
    Corporate social responsibility involvement and disclosure has been becoming increasingly popular among US public firms, including those that qualify as real estate investment trusts. This paper aims to discover the relationship between CSR involvement and potential determinants such as growth opportunities, profitability, visibility, and agency costs. Types of CSR involvement are assessed in terms of environmental, community, and governance disclosures and are quantified using word count from the company’s voluntary disclosure. Our results support the hypothesis (...)
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  46.  39
    Empowering Women Through Corporate Social Responsibility: A Feminist Foucauldian Critique.Lauren McCarthy - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):603-631.
    ABSTRACT:Corporate social responsibility has been hailed as a new means to address gender inequality, particularly by facilitating women’s empowerment. Women are frequently and forcefully positioned as saviours of economies or communities and proponents of sustainability. Using vignettes drawn from a CSR women’s empowerment programme in Ghana, this conceptual article explores unexpected programme outcomes enacted by women managers and farmers. It is argued that a feminist Foucauldian reading of power as relational and productive can help explain this since those involved (...)
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  47.  28
    Corporate Reputation and Collective Crises: A Theoretical Development Using the Case of Rana Plaza.Breeda Comyns & Elizabeth Franklin-Johnson - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (1):159-183.
    Banking scandals, accounting fraud, product recalls, and environmental disasters, their associated reputational effects as well as company response strategies have been well reported in the literature. Reported crises and scandals typically involve one focal company for example BP and the 2010 Deepwater Horizon accident. As business practices change and company supply chains become more complex and interlinked, there is a greater risk of collective crises where multiple companies are associated with the same scandal. We argue that companies are likely to (...)
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  48. Assessing arms makers' corporate social responsibility.Edmund F. Byrne - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):201 - 217.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become a focal point for research aimed at extending business ethics to extra-corporate issues; and as a result many companies now seek to at least appear dedicated to one or another version of CSR. This has not affected the arms industry, however. For, this industry has not been discussed in CSR literature, perhaps because few CSR scholars have questioned this industry's privileged status as an instrument of national sovereignty. But major changes in the (...)
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  49.  76
    The Governance of Corporate Sustainability: Empirical Insights into the Development, Leadership and Implementation of Responsible Business Strategy.Alice Klettner, Thomas Clarke & Martijn Boersma - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (1):145-165.
    This article explores how corporate governance processes and structures are being used in large Australian companies to develop, lead and implement corporate responsibility strategies. It presents an empirical analysis of the governance of sustainability in fifty large listed companies based on each company’s disclosures in annual and sustainability reports. We find that significant progress is being made by large listed Australian companies towards integrating sustainability into core business operations. There is evidence of leadership structures being put in place (...)
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  50. Effective Corporate Codes of Ethics: Perceptions of Code Users.Mark S. Schwartz - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):321-341.
    The study examines employee, managerial, and ethics officer perceptions regarding their companies codes of ethics. The study moves beyond examining the mere existence of a code of ethics to consider the role that code content and code process (i.e. creation, implementation, and administration) might play with respect to the effectiveness of codes in influencing behavior. Fifty-seven in-depth, semi-structured interviews of employees, managers, and ethics officers were conducted at four large Canadian companies. The factors viewed by respondents to be important with (...)
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