Results for 'anthropology'

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  1. In Anthropology, the Image Can Never Have the Last Say the Ninth Annual Gdat Debate, Held in the University of Manchester on 6th December 1997.Bill Watson, Peter Wade & Group for Debates in Anthropological Theory - 1998
     
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  2. State of the art/science.In Anthropology - 1996 - In Paul R. Gross, Norman Levitt & Martin W. Lewis (eds.), The Flight from science and reason. New York N.Y.: The New York Academy of Sciences. pp. 327.
     
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  3. Declaration on anthropology and human rights (1999).Committe for Human Rights & American Anthropological Association - 2009 - In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human rights: an anthropological reader. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  4. Christianity.Anthropology Meaning - 2006 - In Matthew Engelke & Matt Tomlinson (eds.), The limits of meaning: case studies in the anthropology of Christianity. New York: Berghahn Books. pp. 1--37.
     
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  5. Statement on human rights (1947) and commentaries.American Anthropological Association, Julian Steward & H. G. Barnett - 2009 - In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human rights: an anthropological reader. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
     
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  6.  19
    Julie Zahle.Participant Observation & Objectivity In Anthropology - 2013 - In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao González, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer Verlag. pp. 365.
  7. The thirty-fifth annual lecture series.Steven GaMin & Anthropology DepartmenO - 1994 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 25:417-418.
  8.  13
    Anthropology on the boundary and the boundary in anthropology.Dan Martin - 1990 - Human Studies 13 (2):119 - 145.
    The following thoughts grew through a year of seminars with Dr. Michael Herzfeld (Indiana University). Readers of his forthcoming book entitled Anthropology through the Looking-Glass: Critical Ethnography in the Margins of Europe (Cambridge 1987) may note some ideas strikingly similar to those expressed in these pages. I am indebted to him for much of the stimulus and inspiration, as well as for concrete suggestions for revision, and to him I offer this sincere dedication.
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  9.  19
    Homo Natura: Nietzsche, Philosophical Anthropology and Biopolitics.Vanessa Lemm - 2020 - Edinburgh University Press.
    Nietzsche coins the enigmatic term homo natura to capture his understanding of the human being as a creature of nature and tasks philosophy with the renaturalisation of humanity. Following Foucault's critique of the human sciences, Vanessa Lemm discusses the reception of Nietzsche's naturalism in philosophical anthropology, psychoanalysis and gender studies. She offers an original reading of homo natura that brings back the ancient Greek idea of nature and sexuality as creative chaos and of the philosophical life as outspoken and (...)
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  10. Towards a Rational Philosophical Anthropology.[author unknown] - 1979 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 35 (4):442-443.
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  11. The paradox of anthropology at home and solutions to it: a handout and review.Terence Rajivan Edward - manuscript
    This is a one page handout reconstructing the paradox and identifying four solutions in the literature, as well as some concerns about them.
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  12.  39
    Kant and the Human Sciences: Biology, Anthropology and History.Alix Cohen - 2009 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Kant famously identified 'What is man?' as the fundamental question that encompasses the whole of philosophy. Yet surprisingly, there has been no concerted effort amongst Kant scholars to examine Kant's actual philosophy of man. This book, which is inspired by, and part of, the recent movement that focuses on the empirical dimension of Kant's works, is the first sustained attempt to extract from his writings on biology, anthropology and history an account of the human sciences, their underlying unity, their (...)
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  13.  59
    Tree leaf talk: a Heideggerian anthropology.James F. Weiner - 2001 - Oxford ; New York: Berg.
    This is the first book to explore the relationship between Martin Heidegger's work and modern anthropology. Heidegger attracts much scholarly interest among social scientists, but few have explored his ideas in relation to current anthropological debates. The discipline's modernist foundations, the nature of cultural constructionism and of art ñ even what an anthropology of art must include ñ are all informed and illuminated by Heidegger's work. The author argues that many contemporary anthropologists, in their concern to return subjectivity (...)
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  14.  8
    Anthropology and the Cultural Study of Science.Emily Martin - 1998 - Science, Technology and Human Values 23 (1):24-44.
    This essay explores how the distinctively anthropological concept of culture provides uniquely valuable insights into the workings of science in its cultural context. Recent efforts by anthropologists to dislodge the traditional notion of culture as a homogenous, stable whole have opened up a variety of ways of imagining culture that place power differentials, flux, and contradiction at its center. Including attention to a wide variety of social domains outside the laboratory, attending to the ways nonscientists actively engage with scientific knowledge, (...)
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  15.  49
    Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness Distinguished Lecture: Consciousness, “Symbolic Healing,” and the Meaning Response.Daniel E. Moerman - 2012 - Anthropology of Consciousness 23 (2):192-210.
    Symbolic healing, that is, responding to meaningful experiences in positive ways, can facilitate human healing. This process partly engages consciousness and partly evades consciousness completely (sometimes it partakes of both simultaneously). This paper, presented as the Society for the Anthropology of Consciousness Distinguished Lecture at the 2011 AAA meeting in Montreal, reviews recent research on what is ordinarily (and unfortunately) called the “placebo effect.” The author makes the argument that language use should change, and the relevant portions of what (...)
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  16. Why kinship is progeneratively constrained: Extending anthropology.Robert A. Wilson - 2022 - Synthese 200 (2):1-20.
    The conceptualisation of kinship and its study remain contested within anthropology. This paper draws on recent cognitive science, developmental cognitive psychology, and the philosophy of science to offer a novel argument for a view of kinship as progeneratively or reproductively constrained. I shall argue that kinship involves a form of extended cognition that incorporates progenerative facts, going on to show how the resulting articulation of kinship’s progenerative nature can be readily expressed by an influential conception of kinds, the homeostatic (...)
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  17. Freedom, Dialectic and Philosophical Anthropology.Craig Reeves - 2013 - Journal of Critical Realism 12 (1):13-44.
    In this article I present an original interpretation of Roy Bhaskar’s project in Dialectic: The Pulse of Freedom. His major move is to separate an ontological dialectic from a critical dialectic, which in Hegel are laminated together. The ontological dialectic, which in Hegel is the self-unfolding of spirit, becomes a realist and relational philosophical anthropology. The critical dialectic, which in Hegel is confined to retracing the steps of spirit, now becomes an active force, dialectical critique, which interposes into the (...)
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  18.  11
    Circumstantial Deliveries.Rodney Needham & Fellow of All Souls Professor of Social Anthropology Rodney Needham - 1981 - Univ of California Press.
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  19.  85
    The advent of heroic anthropology in the history of ideas.Albert Doja - 2005 - Journal of the History of Ideas 66 (4):633-650.
    In this article the advent of Lévi-Strauss's structural anthropology is described as a reaction against the predominantly phenomenological bias of French philosophy in the post-war years as well as against the old humanism of existentialism which seemed parochial both in its confinement to a specific tradition of western philosophy and in its lack of interest in scientific approach. Nevertheless, the paradigm of structural anthropology cannot be equated with the field of structuralism, which became a very contestable form of (...)
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  20.  2
    Marking Time: On the Anthropology of the Contemporary.Paul Rabinow - 2007 - Princeton University Press.
    In Marking Time, Paul Rabinow presents his most recent reflections on the anthropology of the contemporary. Drawing richly on the work of Michel Foucault, John Dewey, Niklas Luhmann, and, most interestingly, German painter Gerhard Richter, Rabinow offers a set of conceptual tools for scholars examining cutting-edge practices in the life sciences, security, new media and art practices, and other emergent phenomena. Taking up topics that include bioethics, anger and competition among molecular biologists, the lessons of the Drosophila genome, the (...)
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  21. Towards a Rational Philosophical Anthropology.[author unknown] - 1985 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 16 (1):167-176.
     
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  22.  78
    Ethics, Evil, and Anthropology in Kant: Remarks on Allen Wood's.Henry E. Allison - 2001 - Ethics 111 (3):594-613.
  23.  51
    What is armchair anthropology? Observational practices in 19th-century British human sciences.Efram Sera-Shriar - 2014 - History of the Human Sciences 27 (2):26-40.
    The study of human diversity in the first half of the 19th century has traditionally been categorized as a type of armchair-based natural history. If we are to take seriously this characterization of the discipline it requires further unpacking. Armchair anthropology was not a passive pursuit, with minimal analytical reflection that simply synthesized the materials of other writers. Nor was it detached from the activities of informants who were collecting and recording data in the field. Practitioners in the 19th (...)
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  24. Hans Blumenberg's philosophical anthropology: After Heidegger and Cassirer.Vida Pavesich - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 421-448.
    In this paper, I situate Hans Blumenberg historically and conceptually in relation to a subtheme in the famous debate between Martin Heidegger and Ernst Cassirer at Davos, Switzerland in 1929. The subtheme concerns Heidegger’s and Cassirer’s divergent attitudes toward philosophical anthropology as it relates to the starting points and goals of philosophy. I then reconstruct Blumenberg’s anthropology, which involves reconceptualizing Cassirer’s philosophy of symbolic forms in relation to Heidegger’s objections to the philosophical anthropology of his day (e.g., (...)
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  25.  59
    Transhumanism, theological anthropology, and modern biological taxonomy.Travis Dumsday - 2017 - Zygon 52 (3):601-622.
    I examine the ways in which the theological and philosophical debate surrounding transhumanism might profit by a detailed engagement with contemporary biology, in particular with the mainline accounts of species and speciation. After a short introduction, I provide a very brief primer on species concepts and speciation in contemporary biological taxonomy. Then in a third section I draw out some implications for the prospects of our being able intentionally to intervene in human evolution for the production of new species out (...)
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  26. Lectures on Anthropology.Robert B. Louden, Allen W. Wood, Robert R. Clewis & G. Felicitas Munzel (eds.) - 2013 - Cambridge University Press.
    Kant was one of the inventors of anthropology, and his lectures on anthropology were the most popular and among the most frequently given of his lecture courses. This volume contains the first translation of selections from student transcriptions of the lectures between 1772 and 1789, prior to the published version, Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View, which Kant edited himself at the end of his teaching career. The two most extensive texts, Anthropology Friedländer and (...) Mrongovius, are presented here in their entirety, along with selections from all the other lecture transcriptions published in the Academy edition, together with sizeable portions of the Menschenkunde, first published in 1831. These lectures show that Kant had a coherent and well-developed empirical theory of human nature bearing on many other aspects of his philosophy, including cognition, moral psychology, politics and philosophy of history. (shrink)
     
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  27. Moral Philosophy and the ‘Ethical Turn’ in Anthropology.Michael Klenk - 2019 - Zeitschrift Für Ethik Und Moralphilosophie (2):1-23.
    Moral philosophy continues to be enriched by an ongoing empirical turn,mainly through contributions from neuroscience, biology, and psychology. Thusfar, cultural anthropology has largely been missing. A recent and rapidly growing‘ethical turn’ within cultural anthropologynow explicitly and systematically studiesmorality. This research report aims to introduce to an audience in moral philosophyseveral notable works within the ethical turn. It does so by critically discussing theethical turn’s contributions to four topics: the definition of morality, the nature ofmoral change and progress, the truth (...)
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  28.  41
    Originary thinking: elements of generative anthropology.Eric Lawrence Gans - 1993 - Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.
    Originary Thinking deals with generative anthropology, a radically new conception of human science founded on the hypothesis that humanity emerged in a communal event in which intraspecific violence was deferred by the production of a linguistic sign. The author pursues in the areas of religion, ethics, philosophy of language, theory of discourse, and aesthetics, the exploration begun in his The Origin of Language (1981) and continued in The End of Culture (1985) and Science and Faith (1990). The present volume (...)
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  29. Relativism and the Ontological Turn within Anthropology.Martin Paleček & Mark Risjord - 2013 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 43 (1):3-23.
    The “ontological turn” is a recent movement within cultural anthropology. Its proponents want to move beyond a representationalist framework, where cultures are treated as systems of belief that provide different perspectives on a single world. Authors who write in this vein move from talk of many cultures to many “worlds,” thus appearing to affirm a form of relativism. We argue that, unlike earlier forms of relativism, the ontological turn in anthropology is not only immune to the arguments of (...)
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  30.  10
    Plessner's Philosophical Anthropology: Perspectives and Prospects.Jos Mul (ed.) - 2014 - Amsterdam University Press.
    Helmut Plessner (18921985) was one of the founders of philosophical anthropology, and his book 'The Stages of the Organic and Man', first published in 1928, has inspired generations of philosophers, biologists, social scientists, and humanities scholars. This volume offers the first substantial introduction to Plessners philosophical anthropology in English, not only setting it in context with such familiar figures as Bergson, Cassirer, and Merleau-Ponty, but also showing Plessners relevance to contemporary discussions in a wide variety of fields in (...)
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  31.  78
    Nisargadatta Maharaj before the Human Sciences: Praise of Man without Quality. A Flawed Anthropology?Claude Fintz - 2024 - Iris 44.
    In an (indirectly or involuntarily) iconoclastic subject, Claude Fintz proposes to put in perspective the conceptual universe of the humanities by confronting it with the thought of a master of contemporary Indian advaita, Nisargadatta Maharaj—as reflected by his disciple Ramesh S. Balsekar. In this “between” of the scientific and spiritual quest, the great notions of the philosophy of the subject will resonate. The author hypothesizes that this paradoxical encounter is likely to bring out the mystery of a first-person search where, (...)
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  32. Human Beings in Quantum Anthropology: A Paradox of the Discontinuous Experience of Quantum Spacetime.Radek Trnka - manuscript
    This paper is a shortened version of an invited lecture held at the University of Copenhagen (Department of Anthropology) on 28 March 2019.
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  33. Looking at anthropology from a biological point of view: A. C. Haddon's metaphors on anthropology.Arturo Alvarez Roldan - 1992 - History of the Human Sciences 5 (4):21-32.
    As is well known, A. C. Haddon visited Torres Straits for the first time in the\nsummer of 1888 with the purpose of studying, as a marine biologist, the fauna\nand the structure and mode of formation of the coral reefs in Torres Straits. There\nbegan Haddon’s ’conversion’ from zoology to anthropology.’ It seems that\nHaddon felt an urgent need to collect ethnographic information on the islanders\nbecause he saw they were changing and diminishing in number very quickly, and\ntherefore their customs were vanishing.\nVery soon (...)
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  34.  58
    History in the Gene: Negotiations Between Molecular and Organismal Anthropology.Marianne Sommer - 2008 - Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):473-528.
    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize the study of (...)
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  35. Anthropology Today: An Encyclopedic Survey.A. L. Kroeber, Sol Tax, Loren C. Eiseley, Irving Rouse & Carl F. Voegelin - 1953 - Science and Society 17 (4):365-370.
  36.  49
    Sin and Bioethics: Why a Liturgical Anthropology is Foundational.H. Tristram Engelhardt Jr - 2005 - Christian Bioethics 11 (2):221-239.
    The project of articulating a coherent, canonical, content-full, secular morality-cum-bioethics fails, because it does not acknowledge sin, which is to say, it does not acknowledge the centrality of holiness, which is essential to a non-distorted understanding of human existence and of morality. Secular morality cannot establish a particular moral content, the harmony of the good and the right, or the necessary precedence of morality over prudence, because such is possible only in terms of an ultimate point of reference: God. The (...)
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  37. The public anthropology of violence in India. Chitralekha - 2023 - In Didier Fassin & George Steinmetz (eds.), The social sciences in the looking glass: studies in the production of knowledge. Durham: Duke University Press.
     
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  38.  19
    Ontological Turn in Anthropology of Religion: Confrontation with European Le-gacy.Hesna Serra Aksel - 2021 - Cumhuriyet İlahiyat Dergisi 25 (2):679-694.
    Criticism of post-modernizm and post-colonializm caused to question the mission of anthropology in terms of understanding different societies. Materialist, secular and anthropocentric anthropological approaches based on enlightenment and modern assumptions have faced criticism by many disciplines from philosophy and critical theory to science and quantum theory. Anthropology of religion which is a branch of cultural anthropology is also effected by changes within the broader field of anthropology. The aim of this project is to shed light on (...)
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  39.  8
    A Tapestry of Black Anthropology of Freedom: Insights from James H. Cone and Frantz Fanon.SimonMary Asese Aihiokhai - 2023 - Heythrop Journal 64 (6):812-825.
    What is freedom without the ability to wonder and imagine new ways of being in the world? This question is at the heart of the works and contributions of Frantz Fanon and James H. Cone in their responses to the colonialities operating in the Black world, and the appropriate response to such colonialities through the medium of strategic alliances and a theological imagination of what it means to be human that is oriented towards blackness itself. However, since blackness is a (...)
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  40.  20
    Introduction: Between Morality and Anthropology—Sociability in Enlightenment Thought.Eva Piirimäe & Alexander Schmidt - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (5):571-588.
    SummaryThis introductory article sketches out the evolution of the concept of sociability in moral and political debates from Grotius to the German Romantics, so as to elucidate the range and scope of the contributions to this special issue. The article argues that the concept of sociability serves as a bridge between moral theory, domestic politics and international relations, just as it also connects the jurisprudential mode of enquiry to subsequent Enlightenment enquiries into political economy, aesthetics, individual and collective moral psychology, (...)
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  41.  92
    The Idea of Humanity: Anthropology and Anthroponomy in Kant’s Ethics.David G. Sussman - 2001 - New York: Routledge.
    Examining the significance of Kant's account of "rational faith," this study argues that he profoundly revises his account of the human will and the moral philosophy of it in his later religious writings.
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  42.  8
    Killing with Culture: Anthropology’s Ethical Dilemma with War.Traben Pleasant - 2020 - Journal of Military Ethics 18 (4):287-298.
    This article highlights the difficulty of creating a code of ethics in anthropology, particularly one that appropriately addresses the nuanced nature of the military and the anthropologists who con...
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  43.  6
    Anatomy, Mechanism and Anthropology: Nicolas Steno’s Reading of L’Homme.Raphaële Andrault - 2016 - In Stephen Gaukroger & Delphine Antoine-Mahut (eds.), Descartes' Treatise on Man and Its Reception. Springer.
    Nicolas Steno’s criticism of L’Homme played a major role in the early reception of Cartesianism: from the late 1660s, the Discourse on the Anatomy of the Brain has never ceased being used in order to discredit Descartes’s philosophy. And yet, the anatomical works of Nicolas Steno are themselves informed by Cartesian method. This paradox has led to the depiction of Steno either as a repentant Cartesian or a non-Cartesian mechanist. In this paper, I clarify such problematic labels by studying the (...)
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  44.  14
    Ethical self‐making, moral experimentation, and humanitarian encounter: Interdisciplinary engagement with the anthropology of ethics.Letitia M. Campbell - 2020 - Journal of Religious Ethics 48 (4):585-595.
    The interdisciplinary group of authors featured in this focus issue contribute to conversations at the intersection of anthropology and ethics by exploring ethical self‐making and moral experimentation among faith‐based actors in a range of humanitarian settings. Kari Henquinet describes the genealogies of American evangelical humanitarianism by focusing on the ethical self‐formation of early World Vision leaders. Rachel Schneider and Sara Williams each explore practices by which relatively privileged individuals seek to cultivate virtue by engaging with those on the margins, (...)
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  45. Toward a Narrow Cosmopolitanism: Kant’s Anthropology, Racialized Character and the Construction of Europe.Inés Valdez - 2022 - Kantian Review 27 (4):593-613.
    This article explores the distinctions among European peoples’ character established in Kant’s anthropology and their connection with his politics. These aspects are neglected relative to the analysis of race between Europeans and non-Europeans, but Kant’s anthropological works portray the people of Mediterranean Europe as not capable of civilization because of the dominance of passion in their faculty of desire, which he ties to ‘Oriental’ influences in blood or government. Kant then superimposes this racialized anthropology over the historical geopolitics (...)
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  46.  31
    Character and Evil in Kant's Moral Anthropology.Patrick R. Frierson - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):623-634.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Philosophy 44.4 (2006) 623-634 MuseSearchJournalsThis JournalContents[Access article in PDF]Character and Evil in Kant's Moral AnthropologyPatrick FriersonIn the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant explains that moral anthropology studies the "subjective conditions in human nature that help or hinder [people] in fulfilling the laws of a metaphysics of morals" and insists that such anthropology "cannot be dispensed with" (6:217).1 But it is often difficult to (...)
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  47.  61
    Human Genetics and Politics as Mutually Beneficial Resources: The Case of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics During the Third Reich.Sheila Faith Weiss - 2006 - Journal of the History of Biology 39 (1):41-88.
    This essay analyzes one of Germany's former premier research institutions for biomedical research, the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Anthropology, Human Heredity and Eugenics (KWIA) as a test case for the way in which politics and human heredity served as resources for each other during the Third Reich. Examining the KWIA from this perspective brings us a step closer to answering the questions at the heart of most recent scholarship concerning the biomedical community under the swastika: (1) How do we (...)
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  48. Kant on epigenesis, monogenesis and human nature: The biological premises of anthropology.Alix A. Cohen - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (4):675-693.
    The aim of this paper is to show that for Kant, a combination of epigenesis and monogenesis is the condition of possibility of anthropology as he conceives of it and that moreover, this has crucial implications for the biological dimension of his account of human nature. More precisely, I begin by arguing that Kant’s conception of mankind as a natural species is based on two premises: firstly the biological unity of the human species (monogenesis of the human races); and (...)
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  49. Character and evil in Kant's moral anthropology.Patrick R. Frierson - 2006 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (4):623-634.
    In the Metaphysics of Morals, Kant explains that moral anthropology studies the “subjective conditions in human nature that help or hinder [people] in fulfilling the laws of a metaphysics of morals” and insists that such anthropology “cannot be dispensed with” (6:217).1 But it is often difficult to find clear evidence of this sort of anthropology in Kant’s own works. in this paper, i discuss Kant’s account of character as an example of Kantian moral anthropology.
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  50.  19
    On Natural and Transcendental Illusions in a Kantian-Pragmatist Philosophical Anthropology.Sami Pihlström - 2022 - Journal of Transcendental Philosophy 3 (2):193-212.
    The covid-19 pandemic and the increasingly polarized political situation in many countries today have highlighted the significance of various humanly natural intellectual mistakes, cognitive biases, and widespread inferential errors. This essay examines, at a philosophical meta-level, the relation between our natural epistemic errors and the kind of humanly unavoidable transcendental illusion analyzed by Immanuel Kant in the Transcendental Dialectic of the First Critique. While both kinds of illusion are usually primarily discussed in an epistemological context, my approach is not exclusively (...)
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