Results for 'affective neuroscience'

991 found
Order:
  1. Annotating affective neuroscience data with the Emotion Ontology.Janna Hastings, Werner Ceusters, Kevin Mulligan & Barry Smith - 2012 - In Janna Hastings, Werner Ceusters, Kevin Mulligan & Barry Smith (eds.), Third International Conference on Biomedical Ontology. ICBO. pp. 1-5.
    The Emotion Ontology is an ontology covering all aspects of emotional and affective mental functioning. It is being developed following the principles of the OBO Foundry and Ontological Realism. This means that in compiling the ontology, we emphasize the importance of the nature of the entities in reality that the ontology is describing. One of the ways in which realism-based ontologies are being successfully used within biomedical science is in the annotation of scientific research results in publicly available databases. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2.  62
    What affective neuroscience means for science of consciousness.Leonardo Ferreira Almada, Alfredo Pereira Jr & Claudia Carrara-Augustenborg - 2013 - Mens Sana Monographs 11 (1):253.
    The field of affective neuroscience has emerged from the efforts of Jaak Panksepp in the 1990s and reinforced by the work of, among others, Joseph LeDoux in the 2000s. It is based on the ideas that affective processes are supported by brain structures that appeared earlier in the phylogenetic scale (as the periaqueductal gray area), they run in parallel with cognitive processes, and can influence behaviour independently of cognitive judgements. This kind of approach contrasts with the hegemonic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  3.  42
    Affective Neuroscience: Past, Present, and Future.Tim Dalgleish, Barnaby D. Dunn & Dean Mobbs - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (4):355-368.
    The discipline of affective neuroscience is concerned with the underlying neural substrates of emotion and mood. This review presents an historical overview of the pioneering work in affective neuroscience of James and Lange, Cannon and Bard, and Hess, Papez, and MacLean before summarizing the current state of research on the brain regions identified by these seminal researchers. We also discuss the more recent strides made in the field of affective neuroscience. A final section considers (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4.  60
    What affective neuroscience means for science of consciousness.Pereira A. Almada Lf - 2013 - Mens Sana Monographs 11 (1):253.
    The field of affective neuroscience has emerged from the efforts of Jaak Panksepp in the 1990s and reinforced by the work of, among others, Joseph LeDoux in the 2000s. It is based on the ideas that affective processes are supported by brain structures that appeared earlier in the phylogenetic scale (as the periaqueductal gray area), they run in parallel with cognitive processes, and can influence behaviour independently of cognitive judgements. This kind of approach contrasts with the hegemonic (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Philosophical Implications of Affective Neuroscience.Stephen Asma, Jaak Panksepp, Rami Gabriel & Glennon Curran - 2012 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (3-4):6-48.
    These papers are based on a Symposium at the COGSCI Conference in 2010. 1. Naturalizing the Mammalian Mind 2. Modularity in Cognitive Psychology and Affective Neuroscience 3. Affective Neuroscience and the Philosophy of Self 4. Affective Neuroscience and Law.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  6. Affective neuroscience of self-generated thought.Kieran C. R. Fox, Jessica R. Andrews-Hanna, Caitlin Mills, Matthew L. Dixon, Jelena Markovic, Evan Thompson & Kalina Christoff - 2018 - Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1426 (1):25-51.
    Despite increasing scientific interest in self-generated thought-mental content largely independent of the immediate environment-there has yet to be any comprehensive synthesis of the subjective experience and neural correlates of affect in these forms of thinking. Here, we aim to develop an integrated affective neuroscience encompassing many forms of self-generated thought-normal and pathological, moderate and excessive, in waking and in sleep. In synthesizing existing literature on this topic, we reveal consistent findings pertaining to the prevalence, valence, and variability of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  7.  12
    The Affective Neuroscience of Sexuality: Development of a LUST Scale.Jürgen Fuchshuber, Emanuel Jauk, Michaela Hiebler-Ragger & Human Friedrich Unterrainer - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16:853706.
    BackgroundIn recent years, there have been many studies using the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales (ANPS) to investigate individual differences in primary emotion traits. However, in contrast to other primary emotion traits proposed by Jaak Panksepp and colleagues, there is a considerable lack of research on the LUST (L) dimension – defined as an individual’s capacity to attain sexual desire and satisfaction – a circumstance mainly caused by its exclusion from the ANPS. Therefore, this study aims to take a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  16
    Affective neuroscience theory and attitudes towards artificial intelligence.Christian Montag, Raian Ali & Kenneth L. Davis - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-8.
    Artificial intelligence represents a key technology being inbuilt into evermore products. Research investigating attitudes towards artificial intelligence surprisingly is still scarce, although it becomes apparent that artificial intelligence will shape societies around the globe. To better understand individual differences in attitudes towards artificial intelligence, the present study investigated in n = 351 participants associations between the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales (ANPS) and the Attitudes towards Artificial Intelligence framework (ATAI). It could be observed that in particular higher levels of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. An Affective Neuroscience Framework for the Molecular Study of Internet Addiction.Christian Montag, Cornelia Sindermann, Benjamin Becker & Jaak Panksepp - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  10.  26
    Affective Neuroscience and Addiction.Louis C. Charland - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):20-21.
    Hyman (2007) should be commended for bringing up the vexing question of how “loss of control” in addiction relates to issues of moral responsibility. However, his account suffers from a cognitive bias that overlooks the affective and emotional dimensions of addiction. To fully understand these issues, we need to look beyond the confines of cognition and cognitive neuroscience. It is not the case that addiction must be either a brain disease or a moral condition, which is Hyman’s starting (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  77
    Affective neuroscience and addiction.Louis C. Charland - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):20-21.
    The author comments on the article “The neurobiology of addiction: Implications for voluntary control of behavior,‘ by S. E. Hyman. Hyman suggests that addicted individuals have substantial impairments in cognitive control of behavior. The author states that brain and neurochemical systems are involved in addiction. He also suggests that neuroscience can link the diseased brain processes in addiction to the moral struggles of the addicts.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  12.  16
    The affective neuroscience of consciousness: Higher order syntactic thoughts, dual routes to emotion and action, and consciousness.Edmund T. Rolls - 2007 - In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  13.  44
    Developmental affective neuroscience describes mechanisms at the core of dynamic systems theory.Allan N. Schore - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):217-218.
    Lewis describes the developmental core of dynamic systems theory. I offer recent data from developmental neuroscience on the sequential experience-dependent maturation of components of the limbic system over the stages of infancy. Increasing interconnectivity within the vertically integrated limbic system allows for more complex appraisals of emotional value. The earliest organization of limbic structures has an enduring impact on all later emotional processing.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Affective neuroscience and the ancestral sources of human feelings.Jaak Panksepp - 2007 - In Henri Cohen & Brigitte Stemmer (eds.), Consciousness and Cognition: Fragments of Mind and Brain. Elxevier Academic Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  21
    Rethinking reappraisal: Insights from affective neuroscience.Alessandro Grecucci & Remo Job - 2015 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 38:e102.
    Kalisch et al. argue that appraisal and reappraisal are key mechanisms promoting resilience; however, experimental findings seem to contradict this simplistic view. We argue that a deeper look at affective neuroscience may provide complementary and stronger evidence on how emotional reactivity and emotion regulation may affect resilience.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  16.  26
    Cross-Cultural Affective Neuroscience.F. Gökçe Özkarar-Gradwohl - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Panksepp, the father of Affective Neuroscience, dedicated his life to demonstrate that foundations of mental life and consciousness lay in the archaic layers of the brain. He had an evolutionary perspective emphasizing that the subcortical affective systems come prior to cortical cognitive systems. Based on his life-long work, the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales (ANPS) was constructed and a new neurodevelopmental approach to personality was started. The new approach suggested that personality was formed based on the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  17
    Psychoanalysis and Affective Neuroscience. The Motivational/Emotional System of Aggression in Human Relations.Teodosio Giacolini & Ugo Sabatello - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9:421397.
    This paper highlights the evolutionary biological epistemology in Freud psychoanalytic theory. The concepts of aggressive and sexual drives are fulcrum of the psychoanalytic epistemological system, concerning the motivational/emotional roots of mental functioning. These biological roots of mental functioning, especially with regard to aggressive drive, have gradually faded away from psychoanalytic epistemology, as we show in the paper. Currently, however, Neurosciences, and in particular Affective Neuroscience (Panksepp 1998), can contribute to increase the knowledge of the biological roots of human (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  68
    Some Ideas for the Integration of Neurophenomenology and Affective Neuroscience.G. Colombetti - 2013 - Constructivist Foundations 8 (3):288-297.
    Context: Affective neuroscience has not developed first-person methods for the generation of first-person data. This neglect is problematic, because emotion experience is a central dimension of affectivity. Problem: I propose that augmenting affective neuroscience with a neurophenomenological method can help address long-standing questions in emotion theory, such as: Do different emotions come with unique, distinctive patterns of brain and bodily activity? How do emotion experience, bodily feelings and brain and bodily activity relate to one another? Method: (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  19.  96
    What is Basic about Basic Emotions? Lasting Lessons from Affective Neuroscience.Jaak Panksepp & Douglas Watt - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):387-396.
    A cross-species affective neuroscience strategy for understanding the primary-process (basic) emotions is defended. The need for analyzing the brain and mind in terms of evolutionary stratification of functions into at least primary (instinctual), secondary (learned), and tertiary (thought-related) processes is advanced. When viewed in this context, the contentious battles between basic-emotion theorists and dimensional-constructivist approaches can be seen to be largely nonsubstantial differences among investigators working at different levels of analysis.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  20. Jung, Yoga and Affective Neuroscience: Towards a Contemporary Science of the Sacred.Leanne Whitney - 2018 - Cosmos and History 14 (1):306-320.
    Materialist and fundamentalist reductive ideologies obscure our capacity to directly experience the numinous. Thus, importantly, given the weight of the observable and measurable in orthodox science, and oftentimes a dismissal of both the soul and the subjective, a viable means of reconciling science and religious experience has continued to elude us. As a counter-measure to this obscuration, Jungian-oriented depth psychology has developed as an empirical science of the unconscious, researching both subject and object and offering theories and practices that foster (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  23
    A critical role for "affective neuroscience" in resolving what is basic about basic emotions.Jaak Panksepp - 1992 - Psychological Review 99 (3):554-560.
  22.  26
    Social dominance and the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales.Donné van der Westhuizen & Mark Solms - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:90-111.
  23.  48
    Affective Style and Affective Disorders: Perspectives from Affective Neuroscience.Richard J. Davidson - 1998 - Cognition and Emotion 12 (3):307-330.
    Individual differences in emotional reactivity or affective style can be decomposed into more elementary constituents. Several separable of affective style are identified such as the threshold for reactivity, peak amplitude of response, the rise time to peak and the recovery time. latter two characteristics constitute components of affective chronometry The circuitry that underlies two fundamental forms of motivation and and withdrawal-related processes-is described. Data on differences in functional activity in certain components of these are next reviewed, with (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   72 citations  
  24.  29
    An Emotional Call to Action: Integrating Affective Neuroscience in Models of Motor Control.Rebekah L. Blakemore & Patrik Vuilleumier - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (4):299-309.
    Intimate relationships between emotion and action have long been acknowledged, yet contemporary theories and experimental research within affective and movement neuroscience have not been linked into a coherent framework bridging these two fields. Accumulating psychological and neuroimaging evidence has, however, brought new insights regarding how emotions affect the preparation, execution, and control of voluntary movement. Here we review main approaches and findings on such emotion–action interactions. To assimilate key emotion concepts of action tendencies and motive states with fundamental (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  25.  76
    The cognitive-affective neuroscience of the unconscious.Dan J. Stein, Mark Solms & Jack van Honk - 2006 - CNS Spectrums 11 (8):580-583.
  26.  38
    At the intersection of emotion and consciousness: affective neuroscience and extended reticular thalamic activating system (ERTAS) theories of consciousness.Douglas F. Watt - 1999 - In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & David J. Chalmers (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness Iii. MIT Press. pp. 215--229.
  27. Jaak Panksepp: Affective Neuroscience.R. Ellis - 2000 - Consciousness and Emotion 1 (2):313-317.
  28.  19
    Integrating Perspectives on Affective Neuroscience: Introduction to the Special Section on the Brain and Emotion.Stephan Hamann - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (3):187-190.
    In this special section, three target articles present three different perspectives on emotion and how it is implemented in the human brain. Fundamental issues are discussed such as the nature and organization of emotion’s representation in the brain and the best approaches for elucidating emotion’s neural basis. Comments and author replies further discuss these issues and explore their interconnections. A common theme of the target articles and commentaries is that multiple approaches and perspectives must be integrated across all levels of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  39
    Levinas’s Ethical Horizon, Affective Neuroscience, and Social Field Theory.Andrew Tallon - 2009 - Levinas Studies 4:47-67.
  30.  8
    Levinas’s Ethical Horizon, Affective Neuroscience, and Social Field Theory.Andrew Tallon - 2009 - Levinas Studies 4:47-67.
  31. What does emotion teach us about self-deception? Affective neuroscience in support of non-intentionalism.Federico Lauria & Delphine Preissmann - 2018 - Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 13 (2):70-94.
    Intuitively, affect plays an indispensable role in self-deception’s dynamic. Call this view “affectivism.” Investigating affectivism matters, as affectivists argue that this conception favours the non-intentionalist approach to self-deception and offers a unified account of straight and twisted self-deception. However, this line of argument has not been scrutinized in detail, and there are reasons to doubt it. Does affectivism fulfill its promises of non-intentionalism and unity? We argue that it does, as long as affect’s role in self-deception lies in affective (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32.  33
    Valuing Emotions in Punishment: an Argument for Social Rehabilitation with the Aid of Social and Affective Neuroscience.Federica Coppola - 2018 - Neuroethics 14 (3):251-268.
    Dominant approaches to punishment tend to downplay the socio-emotional dimension of perpetrators. This attitude is inconsistent with the body of evidence from social and affective neuroscience and its adjacent disciplines on the crucial role of emotions and emotion-related skills coupled with positive social stimuli in promoting prosocial behavior. Through a literature review of these studies, this article explores and assesses the implications that greater consideration of emotional and social factors in sentencing and correctional practices might have for conventional (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33.  38
    The moral psychology of conflicts of interest: Insights from affective neuroscience.Paul Thagard - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (4):367–380.
    abstract This paper is an investigation of the moral psychology of decisions that involve a conflict of interest. It draws on the burgeoning field of affective neuroscience, which is the study of the neurobiology of emotional systems in the brain. I show that a recent neurocomputational model of how the brain integrates cognitive and affective information in decision‐making can help to answer some important descriptive and normative questions about the moral psychology of conflicts of interest. These questions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  34.  23
    Toward the Constitution of Emotional Feelings: Synergistic Lessons From Izard’s Differential Emotions Theory and Affective Neuroscience.Jaak Panksepp - 2015 - Emotion Review 7 (2):110-115.
    Cal Izard has provided psychology a robust vision of human emotional feelings. He has addressed the full spectrum of emotional-developmental-cognitive complexities entailed in clarifying seemingly impenetrable mysteries: How do we experience emotions and how do they guide cognitive development? Izard’s developmental studies of infant minds integrate the primal evolutionary affective foundations of our nature with the diverse paths of nurture, and are framed in ways that can promote human thriving. His multilayered vision of our emotional nature resonates well with (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35.  24
    Primordial Emotions, Neural Substrates, and Sentience: Affective Neuroscience Relevant to Psychiatric Practice.A. Colasanti & H. D. Critchley - 2021 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 28 (7-8):154-173.
  36. Innate and Emergent: Jung, Yoga and the Archetype of the Self Encounter the Objective Measures of Affective Neuroscience.Leanne Whitney - 2018 - Cosmos and History 14 (2):292-303.
    Jung’s individuation process, the central process of human development, relies heavily on several core philosophical and psychological ideas including the unconscious, complexes, the archetype of the Self, and the religious function of the psyche. While working to find empirical evidence of the psyche’s religious function, Jung studied a variety of subjects including the Eastern liberatory traditions of Buddhism and Patañjali’s Classical Yoga. In these traditions, Jung found substantiation of his ideas on psychospiritual development. Although Jung’s career in soul work was (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  39
    Panksepp’s common sense view of affective neuroscience is not the commonsense view in large areas of neuroscience.Douglas F. Watt - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):81-88.
    Jaak Panksepp’s article ‘Affective Consciousness: Core Emotional Feelings in Animals and Humans’ is a excellent review and summary by a leading empirical contributor whose work for many years has been running counter to reigning behavioristic premises in neuroscience. It may unfortunately be true that he could not get this review published in many neuroscience journals because it attacks too many sacred cows. Panksepp has given readers of Consciousness and Cognition a nicely condensed summary of much of his (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38. Spinoza’s anticipation of contemporary affective neuroscience.H. M. Ravven - 2003 - Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):257-290.
    Spinoza speculated on how ethics could emerge from biology and psychology rather than disrupt them and recent evidence suggests he might have gotten it right. His radical deconstruction and reconstruction of ethics is supported by a number of avenues of research in the cognitive and neurosciences. This paper gathers together and presents a composite picture of recent research that supports Spinoza’s theory of the emotions and of the natural origins of ethics. It enumerates twelve naturalist claims of Spinoza that now (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39. Jung in Dialogue with Freud and Patañjali: Instinct, Affective Neuroscience, and the Reconciliation of Science and Religious Experience.Leanne Whitney - 2017 - Cosmos and History 13 (2):298-312.
    For both Jung and Patañjali our human desire to understand “God” is as real as any other instinct. Jung’s and Patañjali’s models further align in their emphasis on the teleological directedness of the psyche, and their aim at reconciling science and religious experience. As an atheist, Freud was in disagreement, but all three scholars align in their emphasis on the study of affect as an empirical means of entering into the psyche. For Patañjali, the nadir of affect lays in transcending (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  44
    Review of “affective neuroscience” by Jaak Panksepp. [REVIEW]R. Ellis - 2000 - Consciousness and Emotion 1 (2):313-318.
  41.  12
    Toward a Machine Learning Predictive-Oriented Approach to Complement Explanatory Modeling. An Application for Evaluating Psychopathological Traits Based on Affective Neurosciences and Phenomenology.Pasquale Dolce, Davide Marocco, Mauro Nelson Maldonato & Raffaele Sperandeo - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42.  37
    Automatic goals and conscious regulation in social cognitive affective neuroscience.Chandra Sripada, John D. Swain, S. Shaun Ho & James E. Swain - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):156-157.
  43.  26
    Emotions, Learning, and the Brain: Exploring the Educational Implications of Affective Neuroscience, by Mary Helen Immordino-Yang.Jennifer McCrickerd - 2016 - Teaching Philosophy 39 (4):547-552.
  44.  2
    Overcoming Neuroscience’s Lingering Dualism in Cognition and Learning via Emotion: Freedom, Phenomenology, and Affective Neuroscience.Clarence W. Joldersma - 2014 - Philosophy of Education 70:145-153.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  20
    Adopting Neuroscience: Parenting and Affective Indeterminacy.Celia Roberts & Adrian Mackenzie - 2017 - Body and Society 23 (3):130-155.
    What happens when neuroscientific knowledges move from laboratories and clinics into therapeutic settings concerned with the care of children? ‘Brain-based parenting’ is a set of discourses and practices emerging at the confluence of attachment theory, neuroscience, psychotherapy and social work. The neuroscientific knowledges involved understand affective states such as fear, anger and intimacy as dynamic patterns of coordination between brain localities, as well as flows of biochemical signals via hormones such as cortisol. Drawing on our own attempts to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. At the intersection of emotion and consciousness: Review of Panksepp, Affective Neuroscience[REVIEW]D. F. Watt - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7).
  47.  3
    Affect and Cognition in Managerial Decision Making: A Systematic Literature Review of Neuroscience Evidence.Matteo Cristofaro, Pier Luigi Giardino, Andrea P. Malizia & Antonio Mastrogiorgio - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13:762993.
    How do affect and cognition interact in managerial decision making? Over the last decades, scholars have investigated how managers make decisions. However, what remains largely unknown is the interplay of affective states and cognition during the decision-making process. We offer a systematization of the contributions produced on the role of affect and cognition in managerial decision making by considering the recent cross-fertilization of management studies with the neuroscience domain. We implement a Systematic Literature Review of 23 selected contributions (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48.  19
    Comment: Affect Control Theory and Cultural Priming: A Perspective from Cultural Neuroscience.Narun Pornpattananangkul & Joan Y. Chiao - 2014 - Emotion Review 6 (2):136-137.
    Affect control theory posits that emotions are constructed by social and cultural forces. Rogers, Schröder, and von Scheve introduce affect control theory as a conceptual and methodological “hub,” linking theories from different disciplines across levels of analysis. To illustrate this further, we apply their framework to cultural priming, an experimental technique in cultural psychology and neuroscience for testing how exposure to cultural symbols changes people’s behavior, cognition, and emotion. Our analysis supports the use of affect control theory in linking (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion. Series in Affective Science.Richard D. R. Lane, L. Nadel & G. L. Ahern (eds.) - 2000 - Oxford University Press.
  50.  40
    Imitation of Affects and Mirror Neurons: Exploring Empathy in Spinoza’s Theory and Contemporary Neuroscience.Αnna Boukouvala - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (3):1007-1017.
    In Spinoza’s philosophy affects illustrate the way human beings interact with each other and the world, where the necessary meetings with other particular things define their being and its expressions. Most human beings don’t know themselves, are not conscious of their affects and, even less, do they know what the affects of others are. Although, they are by their definition as particular things obliged to exist in society and create a minimum of consensus. According to Spinoza, this consensus is built (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 991