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  1.  13
    Evaluating the Impact of Criminal Laws on HIV Risk Behavior.Zita Lazzarini, Sarah Bray & Scott Burris - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):239-253.
    Criminal law is one of the regulatory tools being used in the United States to influence risk behavior by people who have HIV/AIDS. Several different types of laws have been or could be used in this way These include:HIV-specific exposure and transmission laws — i.e., laws that explicitly mention and exclusively apply to conduct by people with HIV;public health statutes prohibiting conduct that would expose others to communicable diseases and/or sexually transmitted diseases ; andgeneral criminal laws governing attempted murder and (...)
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  2.  9
    Evaluating the Impact of Criminal Laws on HIV Risk Behavior.Zita Lazzarini, Sarah Bray & Scott Burris - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):239-253.
    Criminal law is one of the regulatory tools being used in the United States to influence risk behavior by people who have HIV/AIDS. Several different types of laws have been or could be used in this way These include:HIV-specific exposure and transmission laws — i.e., laws that explicitly mention and exclusively apply to conduct by people with HIV;public health statutes prohibiting conduct that would expose others to communicable diseases and/or sexually transmitted diseases ; andgeneral criminal laws governing attempted murder and (...)
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  3.  5
    Evaluating the Impact of Criminal Laws on HIV Risk Behavior.Zita Lazzarini, Sarah Bray & Scott Burns - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):239-253.
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  4.  15
    Other Branches of Science are Necessary to Form a Lawyer: Teaching Public Health Law in Law School.Richard A. Goodman, Zita Lazzarini, Anthony D. Moulton, Scott Burris, Nanette R. Elster, Paul A. Locke & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):298-301.
    Over two hundred years ago, Thomas Jefferson suggested the need for a broader legal curriculum. As the twenty-first century begins, the practice of law will increasingly demand interdisciplinary knowledge and collaboration — between those trained in law and a broad range of scientific and technical fields, including engineering, biology, genetics, ethics, and the social sciences. The practice of public health law provides a model for both the substantive integration of law with science, and for the way its practitioners work. In (...)
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  5.  38
    The Role of State Law in Protecting Human Subjects of Public Health Research and Practice.Scott Burris, Lance Gable, Lesley Stone & Zita Lazzarini - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):654-662.
    “Public health practice” consists of activities and Programs managed by public health agencies to promote health and prevent disease, injury, and disability. Some of these activities might be deemed to fit within the broad definition of “research” under federal regulations, known as the Common Rule, designed to protect human research subjects. The Common Rule defines research as “a systeniatic investigation, including research development, testing and evaluation, designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” Public health activities that might under some (...)
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  6.  15
    The Role of State Law in Protecting Human Subjects of Public Health Research and Practice.Scott Burris, Lance Gable, Lesley Stone & Zita Lazzarini - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):654-662.
    “Public health practice” consists of activities and Programs managed by public health agencies to promote health and prevent disease, injury, and disability. Some of these activities might be deemed to fit within the broad definition of “research” under federal regulations, known as the Common Rule, designed to protect human research subjects. The Common Rule defines research as “a systeniatic investigation, including research development, testing and evaluation, designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” Public health activities that might under some (...)
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  7.  12
    Other Branches of Science Are Necessary to Form a Lawyer: Teaching Public Health Law in Law School.Richard A. Goodman, Zita Lazzarini, Anthony D. Moulton, Scott Burris, Nanette R. Elster, Paul A. Locke & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (2):298-301.
    Over two hundred years ago, Thomas Jefferson suggested the need for a broader legal curriculum. As the twenty-first century begins, the practice of law will increasingly demand interdisciplinary knowledge and collaboration — between those trained in law and a broad range of scientific and technical fields, including engineering, biology, genetics, ethics, and the social sciences. The practice of public health law provides a model for both the substantive integration of law with science, and for the way its practitioners work. In (...)
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  8.  17
    HIV and the Law: Integrating Law, Policy, and Social Epidemiology.Zita Lazzarini & Robert Klitzman - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):533-547.
    In the foundational piece in this issue of the journal, “Integrating Law and Social Epidemiology,” Burris, Kawachi, and Sarat present a model for understanding the relationship between law and health. This article uses the case of a specific health condition, the human immunodeficiency virus infection, as an opportunity to flesh out this schema and to test how the model “fits” the world of the HIV pandemic. In applying the model to this communicable disease, we hope to illustrate the multitude of (...)
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  9.  12
    HIV and the Law: Integrating Law, Policy, and Social Epidemiology.Zita Lazzarini & Robert Klitzman - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):533-547.
    In the foundational piece in this issue of the journal, “Integrating Law and Social Epidemiology,” Burris, Kawachi, and Sarat present a model for understanding the relationship between law and health. This article uses the case of a specific health condition, the human immunodeficiency virus infection, as an opportunity to flesh out this schema and to test how the model “fits” the world of the HIV pandemic. In applying the model to this communicable disease, we hope to illustrate the multitude of (...)
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  10.  19
    What Lessons Can We Learn from the Exceptionalism Debate (Finally)?Zita Lazzarini - 2001 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (2):149-151.
    How we integrate the astounding advances that genetics makes possible into our language, our conceptions of health and disease, and our systems to collect, control, and protect health-related information is a key question facing health law and policy-makers this decade.For example, the prospect that all of us may harbor the genetic seeds of our own demise forces us to confront the blurring of the lines between “health,” “predisposition,” and “disease.” How will we modify our conceptions of health and disease in (...)
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  11.  5
    What Lessons Can We Learn from the Exceptionalism Debate (Finally)?Zita Lazzarini - 2001 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (2):149-151.
    How we integrate the astounding advances that genetics makes possible into our language, our conceptions of health and disease, and our systems to collect, control, and protect health-related information is a key question facing health law and policy-makers this decade.For example, the prospect that all of us may harbor the genetic seeds of our own demise forces us to confront the blurring of the lines between “health,” “predisposition,” and “disease.” How will we modify our conceptions of health and disease in (...)
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  12.  14
    Applying the Common Rule to Public Health Agencies: Questions and Tentative Answers About a Separate Regulatory Regime.Scott Burris, James Buehler & Zita Lazzarini - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):638-653.
    No one questions the importance of protecting human subjects of research, but over the past few years dissatisfaction has surfaced with the manner in which the protection is conferred by the federal regulatory system referred to as “The Common Rule. ” Some of the criticism surfaces in print. Some bubbles out anecdotally in conversations among researchers, with complaints about the review process being virtually inevitable whenever the topic arises. Like those in other disciplines that differ more or less dramatically from (...)
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  13.  2
    What Lessons Can We Learn from the Exceptionalism Debate (Finally)?Zita Lazzarini - 2001 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 29 (1):149-151.
  14.  27
    Taking Rights Seriously in Health.Scott Bums, Zita Lazzarini & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):490-491.
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  15.  14
    Applying the Common Rule to Public Health Agencies: Questions and Tentative Answers about a Separate Regulatory Regime.Scott Burris, James Buehler & Zita Lazzarini - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):638-653.
    No one questions the importance of protecting human subjects of research, but over the past few years dissatisfaction has surfaced with the manner in which the protection is conferred by the federal regulatory system referred to as “The Common Rule. ” Some of the criticism surfaces in print. Some bubbles out anecdotally in conversations among researchers, with complaints about the review process being virtually inevitable whenever the topic arises. Like those in other disciplines that differ more or less dramatically from (...)
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  16.  13
    Taking Rights Seriously in Health.Scott Bums, Zita Lazzarini & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):490-491.
  17.  8
    Taking Rights Seriously in Health.Scott Burris, Zita Lazzarini & Lawrence O. Gostin - 2002 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 30 (4):490-491.
    Few now question that population health is significantly shaped by social ecology. Power, wealth, and social status clearly matter: Their enactment in daily life makes them fundamental social determinants of health. Important as it is that we accept the broad importance of social factors in health, it is not enough. Our current grasp of the importance of social factors in health has to be strengthened by research that more precisely delineates the workings of social health through social processes, and the (...)
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  18.  36
    Forensic Epidemiology: Law at the Intersection of Public Health and Criminal Investigations.Richard A. Goodman, Judith W. Munson, Kim Dammers, Zita Lazzarini & John P. Barkley - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):684-700.
    Since at least the mid-1970s, public health and law enforcement officials have conducted joint or parallel investigations of both health problems possibly associated with criminal intent and crimes having particular health dimensions. However, the anthrax and other terrorist attacks of fall 2001 have dramatically underscored the needs that public health and law enforcement officials have for a clear understanding of the goals and methods each discipline uses in investigating such problems, including and especially the potential use of biologic agents as (...)
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  19.  11
    Forensic Epidemiology: Law at the Intersection of Public Health and Criminal Investigations.Richard A. Goodman, Judith W. Munson, Kim Dammers, Zita Lazzarini & John P. Barkley - 2003 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (4):684-700.
    Since at least the mid-1970s, public health and law enforcement officials have conducted joint or parallel investigations of both health problems possibly associated with criminal intent and crimes having particular health dimensions. However, the anthrax and other terrorist attacks of fall 2001 have dramatically underscored the needs that public health and law enforcement officials have for a clear understanding of the goals and methods each discipline uses in investigating such problems, including and especially the potential use of biologic agents as (...)
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  20.  38
    A Walk in the Park: A Case Study in Research Ethics.Zita Lazzarini, Patricia Case & Cecil J. Thomas - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):93-103.
    Can researchers, interested in novel ways to assess HIV seroprevalence among populations which are otherwise hidden, collect condoms that have been discarded on the ground in a public sex environment and test them for HIV? Researchers, who use other types of abandoned samples, such as discarded syringes, hair or saliva samples, or excess biological samples, confront similar issues. This review evaluates whether such abandoned tissues can be studied based on U.S. Code of Federal Regulations and literature on related issues including: (...)
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  21.  14
    A Walk in the Park: A Case Study in Research Ethics.Zita Lazzarini, Patricia Case & Cecil J. Thomas - 2009 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):93-103.
    Can researchers, interested in novel ways to assess HIV seroprevalence among populations which are otherwise hidden, collect condoms that have been discarded on the ground in a public sex environment and test them for HIV? Does the Code of Federal Regulations address this question, and if not, what areas of research ethics might provide guidance to an IRB considering such a study? These questions arose as part of a preliminary study to test the feasibility of collecting discarded condoms from a (...)
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