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  1.  21
    Wang Yangming’s Reductionist Account of Practical Necessity: General and Particular.Yat-Hung Leung - 2020 - Sophia 59 (3):413-436.
    In this article, I argue that we can have a plausible account of the experience of practical necessity, namely, the experience that some action is necessitated for someone, by referring to the philosophy of Wang Yangming, a Neo-Confucian philosopher in Ming Dynasty China. The experience of practical necessity, according to Wang, can be of two kinds: general and particular, both having their bases on human nature and related to the fulfillment of the self. I argue that this account fares better (...)
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  2.  23
    Is the Empathy-Induced Motivation to Help Egoistic or Altruistic: Insights From the Neo-Confucian Cheng Hao.Yat-Hung Leung - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 68 (1):140-160.
    Empathy is generally regarded as an emotional contagion between what one person feels and what another, the empathic person, comes to feel. This essay focuses on one aspect of the altruism/egoism debate involving empathy, that is, whether the empathy-induced motivation to help is egoistic, altruistic, or neither, and demonstrates that the philosophy of the Neo-Confucian Cheng Hao 程顥 can provide unique insights. By referring to Cheng's conceptions of empathy and oneness involved in his famous notions of benevolence and "ten thousand (...)
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  3.  13
    From Factitious to Veridical Attribution of Virtue: How Wang Yangming Can Do a Better Job Than Alfano in Facilitating Virtue Acquisition.Yat-Hung Leung - 2019 - Journal of Value Inquiry 53 (2):289-307.
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  4.  1
    Harmony as a Manifestation of the Central Confucian Concept of Benevolence: A Critique of Chenyang Li’s The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony.Yat-Hung Leung - 2021 - In Robert A. Carleo & Yong Huang (eds.), Confucian Political Philosophy: Dialogues on the State of the Field. Springer Verlag. pp. 31-52.
    Yat-hung Leung debates Chenyang Li’s view of harmony and benevolence in Confucian teachings: Which is the more fundamental and important value, and ultimate ideal? In The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony, Li delineates a distinctively Confucian conception of “deep harmony” as the basic ideal of Chinese culture and especially Confucianism. Leung questions that depiction of things, arguing that benevolence does and should hold that place of honor. Leung focuses his arguments against two claims: firstly, that harmony should be understood as the (...)
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