7 found
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  1.  8
    Philosophy of Education in a New Key: Voices From Japan.Morimichi Kato, Naoko Saito, Ryohei Matsushita, Masamichi Ueno, Shigeki Izawa, Yasushi Maruyama, Hirotaka Sugita, Fumio Ono, Reiko Muroi, Yasuko Miyazaki, Jun Yamana, Michael A. Peters & Marek Tesar - forthcoming - Tandf: Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-17.
  2.  20
    Philosophy of Education in a New Key: Future of Philosophy of Education.Liz Jackson, MichaelA Peters, Lei Chen, Zhongjing Huang, Wang Chengbing, Ezekiel Dixon-Román, Aislinn O'Donnell, Yasushi Maruyama, Lisa A. Mazzei, Alison Jones, Candace R. Kuby, Rowena Azada-Palacios, Elizabeth Adams St Pierre, Jacoba Matapo, Gina A. Opiniano, Peter Roberts, Michael Hand, Alecia Y. Jackson, Jerry Rosiek, Te Kawehau Hoskins, Kathy Hytten & Marek Tesar - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (8):1234-1255.
    What is the future of Philosophy of education? Or as many of scholars and thinkers in this final ‘future-focused’ collective piece from the philosophy of education in a new key Series put it, what are the futures—plural and multiple—of the intersections of ‘philosophy’ and ‘education?’ What is ‘Philosophy’; and what is ‘Education’, and what role may ‘enquiry’ play? Is the future of education and philosophy embracing—or at least taking seriously—and thinking with Indigenous ethicoontoepistemologies? And, perhaps most importantly, what is that (...)
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  3.  5
    Philosophy of Education in a New Key: Voices From Japan.Morimichi Kato, Naoko Saito, Ryohei Matsushita, Masamichi Ueno, Shigeki Izawa, Yasushi Maruyama, Hirotaka Sugita, Fumio Ono, Reiko Muroi, Yasuko Miyazaki, Jun Yamana, Michael A. Peters & Marek Tesar - 2022 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 54 (8):1113-1129.
  4.  52
    Ethics Education for Professionals in Japan: A Critical Review.Yasushi Maruyama & Tetsu Ueno - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (4):438-447.
    Ethics education for professionals has become popular in Japan over the last two decades. Many professional schools now require students to take an applied ethics or professional ethics course. In contrast, very few courses of professional ethics for teaching exist or have been taught in Japan. In order to obtain suggestions for teacher education, this paper reviews and examines practices of ethics education for engineers and nurses in Japan that have been successfully implemented. The paper concludes that difficulties in professional (...)
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  5.  50
    The Teaching/Telling Distinction Revisited.Yasushi Maruyama - 2006 - The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 4:93-97.
    Teaching has been one of the central themes in educational research. Not only empirical researchers of education but also philosophers of education inquire into the activity. Philosophers used to analyse the concept of teaching. The merely analytic approach, however, is no longer the main one in educational research. Will philosophical consideration of teaching, then, never contribute to our educational activity or any other activities in our life at all? In order to explore the possibilities for philosophical consideration of teaching, I (...)
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  6.  1
    Philosophy of Education in Taiwan: Retrospect and Prospect.Ruyu Hung, Katia Lenehan, Yen-Yi Lee, Chia-Ling Wang, Yi-Huang Shih, Yan-Hong Ye, Cheng-Hsi Chien, Jui-Hsuan Hung, Chen-Peng Yu, Chun-Ping Wang, Morimichi Kato & Yasushi Maruyama - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-14.
  7.  14
    The Significance of Network Ethics Education in Japanese Universities.Tetsu Ueno & Yasushi Maruyama - 2011 - International Journal of Cyber Ethics in Education 1 (3):50-58.
    Cell phone abuse amongst Japanese school students, including sex crimes and bullying, are commonly managed with filters and phone bans. Many believe these measures are more effective than moral education. Japanese teenagers therefore enter college without moral education in the Internet society, which can cause problems on campus: students plagiarizing from the Internet, or posting anonymous defamatory messages on bulletin boards. Japanese universities address these problems ineffectively. Problems are caused by both student ignorance of network ethics and moral immatureness. Therefore, (...)
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