Results for 'World Medical Association'

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  1. Declaration of Helsinki. Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects.World Medical Association - 2009 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1):233-238.
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  2.  31
    The World Medical Association Launches A Revision of the Declaration of Geneva.Urban Wiesing & Ramin Parsa-Parsi - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (3):140-140.
  3.  3
    Revisions to the World Medical Association’s Declaration of Helsinki: Africa Region Consultation.A. Dhai - 2023 - South African Journal of Bioethics and Law 16 (2):35.
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  4. World Medical Association, Medical ethics manual.P. Momoh - 1983 - In Ian E. Thompson, Kath M. Melia & Kenneth M. Boyd (eds.), Nursing ethics. New York: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. pp. 13--6.
     
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  5.  46
    Medical oath: use and relevance of the Declaration of Geneva. A survey of member organizations of the World Medical Association.Zoé Rheinsberg, Ramin Parsa-Parsi, Otmar Kloiber & Urban Wiesing - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (2):189-196.
    The Declaration of Geneva is one of the core documents of medical ethics. A revision process was started by the World Medical Association in 2016. The WMA has also used this occasion to examine how the Declaration of Geneva is used in countries throughout the world by conducting a survey of all WMA constituent members. The findings are highly important and raise urgent questions for the World Medical Association and its National (...) Associations : The Declaration of Geneva is only rarely used as an oath text despite the fact that physicians’ oaths are generally widespread. This is not consistent with the intention and claim of the Declaration of Geneva. The article then discusses three questions. Should there be one single binding oath? Which organization should be responsible for such an oath? Which oath is the most obvious candidate? In a globalized world and despite all cultural diversity, the medical profession should have one core moral basis which is binding for physicians all over the world. The most obvious candidate for an oath incorporating this moral basis is the Declaration of Geneva. (shrink)
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  6.  48
    The ethics activities of the World Medical Association.Professor John R. Williams - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):7-12.
    Since its formation in 1947, the World Medical Association (WMA) has been a leading voice in international medical ethics. The WMA’s principal ethics activity over the years has been policy development on a wide variety of issues in medical research, medical practice and health care delivery. With the establishment of a dedicated Ethics Unit in 2003, the WMA’s ethics activities have intensified in the areas of liaison, outreach and product development. Initial priorities for the (...)
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  7.  44
    The ethics activities of the world medical association.John R. Williams - 2005 - Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (1):7-12.
    Since its formation in 1947, the World Medical Association (WMA) has been a leading voice in international medical ethics. The WMA’s principal ethics activity over the years has been policy development on a wide variety of issues in medical research, medical practice and health care delivery. With the establishment of a dedicated Ethics Unit in 2003, the WMA’s ethics activities have intensified in the areas of liaison, outreach and product development. Initial priorities for the (...)
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  8.  53
    Response to reviews of the World Medical Association Medical Ethics Manual.J. R. Williams - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):164-165.
    There are many challenges to be met when writing an introductory treatise on an academic topic. The subject matter must be presented in a simple but not oversimplified manner. Enough theory must be included to ground the discussion of specific issues but not so much as to overwhelm or bore the readers. The text should be long enough to do justice to the subject matter but short enough to be readily accessible, especially for readers such as healthcare professionals, whose primary (...)
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  9.  29
    Research ethics revised: The new CIOMS guidelines and the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki in context.Angela Ballantyne & Stefan Eriksson - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (3):310-311.
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  10.  38
    On the disenchantment of medicine: Abraham Joshua Heschel’s 1964 address to the American Medical Association.Alan B. Astrow - 2018 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 39 (6):483-497.
    In 1964, the American Medical Association invited liberal theologian Abraham Joshua Heschel to address its annual meeting in a program entitled “The Patient as a Person” [1]. Unsurprisingly, in light of Heschel’s reputation for outspokenness, he launched a jeremiad against physicians, claiming: “The admiration for medical science is increasing, the respect for its practitioners is decreasing. The depreciation of the image of the doctor is bound to disseminate disenchantment and to affect the state of medicine itself” [1, (...)
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  11.  46
    Extracts from the New Zealand minister of health's speech to the New Zealand medical association conference. 19 April 1994.Jenny Shipley - 1995 - Health Care Analysis 3 (2):116-118.
    I said at the beginning that some quantum leaps in our thinking would be required as we face up to the challenges and changes that health care delivery will and must undergo.It is not a matter of politics, it is a matter of pragmatism.It is a matter of reality and it's a matter of simply having to face up to what, may I say, has been glaringly obious for some time.I know that doctors come with a strong ethos in terms (...)
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  12.  67
    Human rights from the Nuremberg Doctors Trial to the Geneva Declaration. Persons and institutions in medical ethics and history.Andreas Frewer - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):259-268.
    The “Universal Declaration of Human Rights” and the “Geneva Declaration” by the World Medical Association, both in 1948, were preceded by the foundation of the United Nations in New York (1945), the World Medical Association in London (1946) and the World Health Organization in Geneva (1948). After the end of World War II the community of nations strove to achieve and sustain their primary goals of peace and security, as well as their (...)
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  13.  15
    The promises and limitations of codes of medical ethics as instruments of policy change.Ana Komparic, Patrick Garon-Sayegh & Cécile M. Bensimon - 2023 - Bioethics 37 (4):406-415.
    Codes of medical ethics (codes) are part of a longstanding tradition in which physicians publicly state their core values and commitments to patients, peers, and the public. However, codes are not static. Using the historical evolution of the Canadian Medical Association's Code of Ethics as an illustrative case, we argue that codes are living, socio-historically situated documents that comprise a mix of prescriptive and aspirational content. Reflecting their socio-historical situation, we can expect the upheaval of the COVID-19 (...)
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  14.  17
    The Declaration of Helsinki in bioethics literature since the last revision in 2013.Hans-Jörg Ehni & Urban Wiesing - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):335-343.
    The World Medical Association has announced that a new revision process of the Declaration of Helsinki has been started. This article will identify the criticisms that have been made in the bioethics literature, particularly since the last revision. In addition, criticisms are discussed that were made in the literature even before the last revision and have not fallen silent. The plausibility of the recommendation for a change in the Declaration of Helsinki is examined.
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  15.  25
    The revised International Code of Medical Ethics: an exercise in international professional ethical self-regulation.Ramin W. Parsa-Parsi, Raanan Gillon & Urban Wiesing - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):163-168.
    The World Medical Association (WMA), the global representation of the medical profession, first adopted the International Code of Medical Ethics (ICoME) in 1949 to outline the professional duties of physicians to patients, other physicians and health professionals, themselves and society as a whole. The ICoME recently underwent a major 4-year revision process, culminating in its unanimous adoption by the WMA General Assembly in October 2022 in Berlin. This article describes and discusses the ICoME, its revision (...)
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  16.  6
    First do no harm: medical ethics in international humanitarian law.Sigrid Mehring - 2015 - Boston: Brill Nijhoff.
    The role of physicians in armed conflict -- International humanitarian law -- International criminal law -- Customary status of international humanitarian law -- The relevant human rights norms applicable to the work of physicians in armed conflict -- The interpretation of the reference to medical ethics and generally accepted medical standards pursuant to the Vienna Convention on the Law of Treaties -- Medical ethics in international law -- A pluralistic approach to medical ethics -- The documents (...)
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  17.  22
    Steve Biko, medical student leader of the South African “Black Con-sciousness Movement,” was arrested on August 6, 1977, and died on September 11 as a result of police beatings. Biko was seen by two dis-trict surgeons who were later accused of failing to render adequate atten-tion. At the time these doctors were defended by the Medical Association of South Africa and the South African Medical and Dental Council. One of the two continued to practice as a district surgeon in the Port Eliza-beth region ... [REVIEW]Wendy Orr - 2008 - In Neil Arya & Joanna Santa Barbara (eds.), Peace through health: how health professionals can work for a less violent world. Sterling, VA: Kumarian Press. pp. 1111.
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  18.  35
    Illegitimate authorship and flawed procedures: Fundamental, formal criticisms of the Declaration of Helsinki.Hans‐Joerg Ehni & Urban Wiesing - 2018 - Bioethics 33 (3):319-325.
    Some of the recent criticisms published during and after the last revision process of the Declaration of Helsinki are directed at its basic legitimacy. In this article we want to have a closer look at the two criticisms we consider to be the most fundamental. The first criticism questions the legitimate authorship of the World Medical Association to publish a document such as the Declaration. The second fundamental criticism we want to examine argues that the last revision (...)
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  19.  73
    Conflicts of interest in science and medicine: the physician’s perspective.Delon Human - 2002 - Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):273-276.
    The various statements and declarations of the World Medical Association that address conflicts of interest on the part of physicians as (1) researchers, and (2) practitioners, are examined, with particular reference to the October 2000 revision of the Declaration of Helsinki. Recent contributions to the literature, notably on conflicts of interest in medical research, are noted. Finally, key provisions of the American Medical Association’s Code of Medical Ethics (2000–2001 Edition) that address the various (...)
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  20.  22
    Medical practice: defendants and prisoners.P. Bowden - 1976 - Journal of Medical Ethics 2 (4):163-172.
    It is argued in this paper that a doctor cannot serve two masters. The work of the prison medical officer is examined and it is shown that his dual allegiance to the state and to those individuals who are under his care results in activities which largely favour the former. The World Health Organisation prescribes a system of health ethics which indicates, in qualitative terms, the responsibility of each state for health provisions. In contrast, the World (...) Association acts as both promulgator and guardian of a code of medical ethics which determines the responsibilities of the doctor to his patient. In the historical sense medical practitioners have always emphasized the sanctity of the relationship with their patients and the doctor's role as an expert witness is shown to have centered around this bond. The development of medical services in prisons has focused more on the partnership between doctor and institution. Imprisonment in itself could be seen as prejudicial to health as are disciplinary methods which are more obviously detrimental. The involvement of medical practitioners in such procedures is discussed in the light of their role as the prisoner's personal physician. (shrink)
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  21.  24
    Medical Ethics in a Time of De-Communization.Robert Baker - 1992 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 2 (4):363-370.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Medical Ethics in a Time of De-CommunizationRobert Baker (bio)Ethics is often treated as a matter of ethereal principles abstracted from the particulars of time and place. A natural correlate of this approach is the attempt to measure actual codes of ethics in terms of basic principles. Such an exercise can be illuminating, but it can also obscure the circumstances that make a particular codification of morality a meaningful (...)
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  22.  23
    The WMA on medical ethics--some critical comments.S. Holm - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (3):161-162.
    Because the WMA’s new manual contains a partially partisan view of what constitutes medical ethics, if used for teaching it needs to be balanced by other materialsThe recent publication of the World Medical Association’s Medical Ethics Manual should be welcomed since it gives people all over the world, or at least those people who are on the internet and who have a reasonable printer, access to an introduction to medical ethics that can be (...)
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  23.  39
    Patients, doctors and experimentation: doubts about the Declaration of Helsinki.A. Belsey - 1978 - Journal of Medical Ethics 4 (4):182-185.
    The World Medical Association's Declaration of Helsinki offers guidelines to doctors engaged in biomedical research with human subjects. The fundamental distinction of the Declaration is between clinical research combined with professional care and non-clinical scientific research. If hospital patients are the experimental subjects, then the former research must be carried out by the patient's own doctor, whereas the latter research must not be; it must be carried out by other doctors. The relevance of the distinction between the (...)
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  24.  43
    The standard of care debate: the Declaration of Helsinki versus the international consensus opinion.R. K. Lie - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):190-193.
    The World Medical Association’s revised Declaration of Helsinki endorses the view that all trial participants in every country are entitled to the worldwide best standard of care. In this paper the authors show that this requirement has been rejected by every national and international committee that has examined this issue. They argue that the consensus view now holds that it is ethically permissible, in some circumstances, to provide research participants less than the worldwide best care. Finally, the (...)
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  25.  22
    Who Cares? The Declaration of Helsinki and 'The Conscience of Physicians'.James Appleyard - 2008 - Research Ethics 4 (3):106-110.
    The World Medical Association's ‘Declaration of Helsinki’ on Medical Research on Human Subjects is undergoing its sixth revision in its 44 years. The aim of this paper is to put the Declaration into an historical context, define and identify the core ethical principles, and illustrate how these are applied within the Declaration.
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  26.  44
    When Doctoring is not about Doctoring: An Ethical Analysis of Practices Associated with Canadian Immigration HIV Testing.Laura Bisaillon & Carolyn Ells - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (3):287-297.
    Immigration medicine and the work carried out by Panel Physicians within the Canadian immigration system give rise to ethically troublesome practices and consequences. In this analysis in three parts, we explore the context of the immigration medical examination, characterize the observed and potential burdens and harms for immigrant and refugee applicants with HIV, and critically assess the possibilities for transforming immigration medical practices and policy to reduce inequities. We use the Code of Ethics of the Canadian Medical (...)
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  27.  22
    Placebo: Its action and place in health research today. [REVIEW]Dr Randolph Smoak Jr - 2004 - Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (1):9-13.
    The place for the placebo in human clinical research is addressed in this paper. The World Medical Association which is comprised of some 80 National Medical Associations uses much of its resources to address medical ethics and human rights issues. It adopted the Declaration of Helsinki in June 1964 which addressed the protection of individuals in clinical trials. The use of placebos assumes an important role in this document. Five Revisions of the Declaration of Helsinki (...)
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  28.  27
    The revised International Code of Medical Ethics: responses to some important questions.Ramin W. Parsa-Parsi, Raanan Gillon & Urban Wiesing - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (3):179-180.
    We thank our commentators for their thoughtful responses to our paper1 covering among other issues the relationships of ethics law and professional codes, the tensions between ethical universalism and cultural relativism and the phenomenon of moral judgement required when ethical norms conflict, including the norms of patient care versus obligations to others both now and in the future. Although the comments deserve more extensive discussion, in what follows we respond briefly to specific aspects of each commentary and remind readers that (...)
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  29.  19
    The 2008 Declaration of Helsinki — First among Equals in Research Ethics?Annette Rid & Harald Schmidt - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (1):143-148.
    The World Medical Association's Declaration of Helsinki is one of the most important and influential international research ethics documents. Launched in 1964, when ethical guidance for research was scarce, the Declaration comprised eleven basic principles and provisions on clinical research. The document has since evolved to a complex set of principles, norms, and directions for action of varying degrees of specificity, ranging from specific rules to broad aspirational statements. It has been revised six times in an effort (...)
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  30.  36
    Euthanasia in The Netherlands: The Role of the Dutch Medical Profession.R. J. M. Dillmann - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (1):100.
    Is it remarkable that the Royal Dutch Medical Association as a medical professional organization has the point of view that in particular circumstances euthanasia is an acceptable act for a physician. Seen from the viewpoints in the international community, we might say that it is highly remarkable. Frankly put: the RDMA has met strong international disapproval of its standpoint on euthanasia during the last 10 years or so. For instance, the World Medical Association still (...)
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  31.  35
    Social Health Disparities in Clinical Care: A New Approach to Medical Fairness.Klaus Puschel, Enrico Furlan & Wim Dekkers - 2015 - Public Health Ethics:phv034.
    Social health disparities are increasing in most countries around the world. During the past two decades, a large amount of evidence has emerged about the health consequences of social inequalities. Despite such evidence, the concept of medical fairness, as traditionally defined by the World Medical Association, has remained unchallenged and even reinforced by some scholars who emphasize that doctors should remain neutral to the socioeconomic status of their patients when providing clinical care. The inconsistency between (...)
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  32. Do medical schools teach medical humanities? Review of curricula in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom.Jeremy Howick, Lunan Zhao, Brenna McKaig, Alessandro Rosa, Raffaella Campaner, Jason Oke & Dien Ho - 2021 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice (1):86-92.
    Rationale and objectives: Medical humanities are becoming increasingly recognized as positively impacting medical education and medical practice. However, the extent of medical humanities teaching in medical schools is largely unknown. We reviewed medical school curricula in Canada, the UK and the US. We also explored the relationship between medical school ranking and the inclusion of medical humanities in the curricula. -/- Methods: We searched the curriculum websites of all accredited medical schools (...)
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  33.  79
    Decisions Relating to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation: a joint statement from the British Medical Association, the Resuscitation Council (UK) and the Royal College of Nursing.British Medical Association - 2001 - Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):310.
    Summary Principles Timely support for patients and people close to them, and effective, sensitive communication are essential. Decisions must be based on the individual patient's circumstances and reviewed regularly. Sensitive advance discussion should always be encouraged, but not forced. Information about CPR and the chances of a successful outcome needs to be realistic. Practical matters Information about CPR policies should be displayed for patients and staff. Leaflets should be available for patients and people close to them explaining about CPR, how (...)
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  34.  40
    Is the international regulation of medical complicity with torture largely window dressing? The case of Israel and the lessons of a 12-year medical ethical appeal.Derek Summerfield - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):367-370.
    This is the account of an ongoing appeal initiated in 2009 by 725 doctors from 43 countries concerning medical complicity with torture in Israel. It has been underpinned by a voluminous and still accumulating evidence base from reputable international and regional human rights organisations, quoted below, and has spanned the terms of office of four World Medical Association presidencies and two UN special rapporteurs on torture. This campaign has been a litmus test of whether international (...) codes regarding doctors and torture actually matter, and are applied rigorously and even-handededly, particularly when compelling evidence incriminates a WMA member association. Our findings in the case of Israel suggest that this is not true, and that impunity largely operates. The WMA seems in partisan violation of its mandate to be the official international watchdog on the ethical behaviour of doctors. And as the IMA case demonstrates, by their inaction national medical associations or other regulatory bodies appear to function at base as buttresses and shields of the state. All data relevant to the study are included in the article. (shrink)
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  35.  34
    The Nazi doctors and the medical community; Honor or censure? The case of Hans Sewering.Lawrence W. White - 1996 - Journal of Medical Humanities 17 (2):119-135.
    During the Nazi era, most German physicians abrogated their responsibilities to individual patients, and instead chose to advocate the interests of an evil regime. In so doing, several fundamental bioethical principles were violated. Despite gross violations of individual rights, many physicians went on to have successful careers, and in many cases were honored. This paper will review the case of Hans Sewering, a participant in the Nazi euthanasia program who became the President-elect of the World Medical Association. (...)
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  36. Moral Luck in Medical Ethics and Practical Politics.Donna Dickenson - 1989 - Dissertation, Open University (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. ;Typically we maintain two incompatible standards towards right action and good character, and the tension between these polarities creates the paradox of moral luck. In practice we regard actions as right or wrong, and character as good or bad, partly according to what happens as a result of the agent's decision. Yet we also think that people should not be held responsible for matters beyond their control. ;This split underpins Kant's (...)
     
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  37.  96
    Medicalizing Mental Health: A Phenomenological Alternative. [REVIEW]Kevin Aho - 2008 - Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (4):243-259.
    With the increasingly close relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and the American Psychiatric Association (APA) there has been a growing tendency in the mental health professions to interpret everyday emotional suffering and behavior as a medical condition that can be treated with a particular drug. In this paper, I suggest that hermeneutic phenomenology is uniquely suited to challenge the core assumptions of medicalization by expanding psychiatry's narrow conception of the self as an enclosed, biological individual and recognizing the (...)
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  38.  17
    Raising the profile of fairness and justice in medical practice and policy.Raanan Gillon - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (12):789-790.
    Justice, one of the four Beauchamp and Childress prima facie basic principles of biomedical ethics, is explored in two excellent papers in the current issue of the journal. The papers stem from a British Medical Association essay competition on justice and fairness in medical practice and policy. Although the competition was open to all comers, of the 235 entries both the winning paper by Alistair Wardrope1 and the highly commended runner-up by Zoe Fritz and Caitríona Cox2 were (...)
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  39.  66
    Assay Sensitivity and the Epistemic Contexts of Clinical Trials.Spencer Phillips Hey & Charles Weijer - 2013 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 56 (1):1-17.
    In February 2010, the World Medical Association hosted an international symposium on the ethics of placebo controls in clinical trials (WMA 2010). Despite years of debate, ethicists, clinical trialists, and policy makers remain divided over the ethical acceptability of using placebos in research when a proven, effective treatment is available. The protracted nature of this problem is due, at least in part, to a perceived conflict between the opposing demands placed on clinical research by science and ethics. (...)
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  40.  25
    Multiplex Genetic Testing.American Medical Association The Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
  41.  17
    Judging the Scientific and Medical Literature: Some Legal Implications of Changes to Biomedical Research and Publication.Gary Edmond - 2008 - Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 28 (3):523-561.
    Over the last two decades judges (and regulators) in all common law jurisdictions have increased their reliance on published medical and scientific literature. During the same period biomedical research has undergone fundamental and unprecedented change. This article explores some of the changes to the location, organization and funding of biomedical research in order to assess their implications for liability and proof. Focusing on peer review and publication, along with reforms promoted by the editors of some of the world's (...)
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  42.  46
    Human Dignity, Human Rights, and Responsibility: The New Language of Global Bioethics and Biolaw.Yechiel Michael Barilan - 2012 - MIT Press.
    "Human dignity" has been enshrined in international agreements and national constitutions as a fundamental human right. The World Medical Association calls on physicians to respect human dignity and to discharge their duties with dignity. And yet human dignity is a term--like love, hope, and justice--that is intuitively grasped but never clearly defined. Some ethicists and bioethicists dismiss it; other thinkers point to its use in the service of particular ideologies. In this book, Michael Barilan offers an urgently (...)
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  43.  30
    A Physician’s Role Following a Breach of Electronic Health Information.Daniel Kim, Kristin Schleiter, Bette-Jane Crigger, John W. McMahon, Regina M. Benjamin, Sharon P. Douglas & American Medical Association The Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs - 2010 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 21 (1):30-35.
    The Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs of the American Medical Association examines physicians’ professional ethical responsibility in the event that the security of patients’ electronic records is breached.
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  44.  30
    Subject Selection for Clinical Trials.American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs - forthcoming - IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
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  45.  13
    Physician outreach during a pandemic: shared or collective responsibility?Elizabeth Lanphier - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (7):495-496.
    In ‘Ethics of sharing medical knowledge with the community: is the physician responsible for medical outreach during a pandemic?’ Strous and Karni note that the revised physician’s pledge in the World Medical Association Declaration of Geneva obligates individual physicians to share medical knowledge, which they interpret to mean a requirement to share knowledge publicly and through outreach. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, Strous and Karni defend a form of medical paternalism insofar (...)
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  46.  69
    The right to practice medicine without repercussions: ethical issues in times of political strife.Leith Hathout - 2012 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7:1-6.
    This commentary examines the incursion on the neutrality of medical personnel now taking place as part of the human rights crises in Bahrain and Syria, and the ethical dilemmas which these incursions place not only in front of physicians practicing in those nations, but in front of the international community as a whole.In Bahrain, physicians have recently received harsh prison terms, apparently for treating demonstrators who clashed with government forces. In Syria, physicians are under the same political pressure to (...)
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  47.  36
    Just Healthcare beyond Individualism: Challenges for North American Bioethics.Solomon R. Benatar - 1997 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 6 (4):397-415.
    Medical practitioners have traditionally seen themselves as part of an international community with shared and unifying scientific and ethical goals in the treatment of disease, the promotion of health, and the protection of life. This shared mission is underpinned by explicit acceptance of traditional concepts of medical morality, and by an implied link between individual human rights and the ethics of medical practice long enshrined in a range of World Medical Association (WMA) and other (...)
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  48.  29
    Ethics briefings.Martin Davies, Sophie Brannan, Eleanor Chrispin, Veronica English & Rebecca Mussell - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):599-600.
    Force-feeding of detainees at Guantánamo BayIn April, the US Department of Defense reportedly sent 40 additional military medical personnel, including doctors and nurses, to the Guantánamo Bay Naval Base to carry out the force-feeding of detainees on hunger strike.1 By the end of June, up to 104 of the remaining 166 individuals held in US military detention at Guantánamo were refusing food. The protest against conditions at the base, and the fate of those being held there—including those already cleared (...)
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  49.  23
    Is it unethical to publish data from Chinese transplant research?Cory E. Goldstein & Andrew Peterson - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (10):689-690.
    Non-consensual organ procurement from prisoners in China raises serious questions regarding the ethics of Chinese transplant research. In their article, published in this issue of JME, Higgins and colleagues address these questions through the lens of publication ethics. They argue that, ‘while there are potentially compelling justifications for use [of unethical research] under some circumstances, these justifications fail when unethical practices are ongoing’.1 Consequently, they recommend non-publication of Chinese transplant research and call for a mass retraction of the articles identified (...)
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  50.  22
    The Hippocratic Oath and the Declaration of Geneva: legitimisation attempts of professional conduct.Urban Wiesing - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 23 (1):81-86.
    The Hippocratic Oath and the Declaration of Geneva of the World Medical Association are compared in terms of content and origin. Their relevance for current medical practice is investigated. The status which is ascribed to these documents will be shown and the status which they can reasonably claim to have will be explored. Arguments in favor of the Hippocratic Oath that rely on historical stability or historical origin are being examined. It is demonstrated that they get (...)
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