20 found
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  1.  42
    The Role of Covariation Versus Mechanism Information in Causal Attribution.Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Charles W. Kalish, Douglas L. Medin & Susan A. Gelman - 1995 - Cognition 54 (3):299-352.
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  2.  24
    Feature Centrality and Conceptual Coherence.Steven A. Sloman, Bradley C. Love & Woo-Kyoung Ahn - 1998 - Cognitive Science 22 (2):189-228.
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  3.  61
    Why Essences Are Essential in the Psychology of Concepts.Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Charles Kalish, Susan A. Gelman, Douglas L. Medin, Christian Luhmann, Scott Atran, John D. Coley & Patrick Shafto - 2001 - Cognition 82 (1):59-69.
  4.  37
    Why Are Different Features Central for Natural Kinds and Artifacts?: The Role of Causal Status in Determining Feature Centrality.Woo-Kyoung Ahn - 1998 - Cognition 69 (2):135-178.
  5.  17
    Clinical Psychologists' Theory-Based Representations of Mental Disorders Predict Their Diagnostic Reasoning and Memory.Nancy S. Kim & Woo-Kyoung Ahn - 2002 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 131 (4):451-476.
  6.  16
    A Two‐Stage Model of Category Construction.Woo-Kyoung Ahn & Douglas L. Medin - 1992 - Cognitive Science 16 (1):81-121.
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  7.  25
    Causal Status Effect in Children's Categorization.Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Susan A. Gelman, Jennifer A. Amsterlaw, Jill Hohenstein & Charles W. Kalish - 2000 - Cognition 76 (2):B35-B43.
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  8.  20
    Mental Health Clinicians' Beliefs About the Biological, Psychological, and Environmental Bases of Mental Disorders.Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Caroline C. Proctor & Elizabeth H. Flanagan - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (2):147-182.
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  9.  41
    Causal Networks or Causal Islands? The Representation of Mechanisms and the Transitivity of Causal Judgment.Samuel G. B. Johnson & Woo-Kyoung Ahn - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (7):1468-1503.
    Knowledge of mechanisms is critical for causal reasoning. We contrasted two possible organizations of causal knowledge—an interconnected causal network, where events are causally connected without any boundaries delineating discrete mechanisms; or a set of disparate mechanisms—causal islands—such that events in different mechanisms are not thought to be related even when they belong to the same causal chain. To distinguish these possibilities, we tested whether people make transitive judgments about causal chains by inferring, given A causes B and B causes C, (...)
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  10.  34
    Schema Acquisition From a Single Example.Woo-Kyoung Ahn, William F. Brewer & Raymond J. Mooney - 1988 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):509-509.
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  11.  12
    BUCKLE: A Model of Unobserved Cause Learning.Christian C. Luhmann & Woo-Kyoung Ahn - 2007 - Psychological Review 114 (3):657-677.
  12.  13
    The Meaning and Computation of Causal Power: Comment on Cheng and Novick and Cheng.Christian C. Luhmann & Woo-Kyoung Ahn - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (3):685-692.
  13. The Influence of Framing on Clinicians’ Judgments of the Biological Basis of Behaviors.Nancy S. Kim, Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Samuel G. B. Johnson & Joshua Knobe - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 22 (1):39-47.
    Practicing clinicians frequently think about behaviors both abstractly (i.e., in terms of symptoms, as in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed., DSM–5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) and concretely (i.e., in terms of individual clients, as in DSM–5 Clinical Cases; Barnhill, 2013). Does abstract/concrete framing influence clinical judgments about behaviors? Practicing mental health clinicians (N ? 74) were presented with hallmark symptoms of 6 disorders framed abstractly versus concretely, and provided ratings of their biological and psychological bases (...)
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  14. The Effect of Abstract Versus Concrete Framing on Judgments of Biological and Psychological Bases of Behavior.Kim Nancy, Samuel Johnson, Woo-Kyoung Ahn & Joshua Knobe - forthcoming - Cognitive Research: Principles and Implications.
    Human behavior is frequently described both in abstract, general terms and in concrete, specific terms. We asked whether these two ways of framing equivalent behaviors shift the inferences people make about the biological and psychological bases of those behaviors. In five experiments, we manipulated whether behaviors are presented concretely (i.e. with reference to a specific person, instantiated in the particular context of that person’s life) or abstractly (i.e. with reference to a category of people or behaviors across generalized contexts). People (...)
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  15. Causal Inference When Observed and Unobserved Causes Interact.Benjamin M. Rottman & Woo-Kyoung Ahn - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. pp. 1477--1482.
    When a cause interacts with unobserved factors to produce an effect, the contingency between the observed cause and effect cannot be taken at face value to infer causality. Yet, it would be computationally intractable to consider all possible unobserved, interacting factors. Nonetheless, two experiments found that when an unobserved cause is assumed to be fairly stable over time, people can learn about such interactions and adjust their inferences about the causal efficacy of the observed cause. When they observed a period (...)
     
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  16.  4
    Neurodualism: People Assume That the Brain Affects the Mind More Than the Mind Affects the Brain.Jussi Valtonen, Woo-Kyoung Ahn & Andrei Cimpian - 2021 - Cognitive Science 45 (9):e13034.
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  17. When and How Do People Reason About Unobserved Causes.Benjamin Rottman, Woo-Kyoung Ahn & Christian Luhmann - 2011 - In Phyllis McKay Illari, Federica Russo & Jon Williamson (eds.), Causality in the Sciences. Oxford University Press. pp. 150.
     
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  18.  40
    Safe Takeoffs—Soft Landings.Douglas L. Medin, Woo-Kyoung Ahn, Jeffrey Bettger, Judy Florian, Robert Goldstone, Mary Lassaline, Arthur Markman, Joshua Rubinstein & Edward Wisniewski - 1990 - Cognitive Science 14 (1):169-178.
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  19. Acknowledgment: Guest Reviewers.Frederick Adams, Wilson Geisler, David Over, Woo-Kyoung Ahn, LouAnn Gerken, Thomas Palmeri, Kathleen Akins, Lisa Gershkoff-Stowe, David Papineau & Gerry Altmann - 2002 - Cognitive Science 26:841-842.
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  20.  5
    Postscript: Abandonment of Causal Power.Christian C. Luhmann & Woo-Kyoung Ahn - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (3):692-693.
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