14 found
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  1.  13
    A Qualitative Analysis of Ethical Perspectives on Recruitment and Consent for Human Intracranial Electrophysiology Studies.Joncarmen V. Mergenthaler, Winston Chiong, Daniel Dohan, Josh Feler, Cailin R. Lechner, Philip A. Starr & Jalayne J. Arias - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 12 (1):57-67.
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  2.  12
    Insiders and Outsiders: Lessons for Neuroethics from the History of Bioethics.Winston Chiong - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (3):155-166.
    Over its short history, the young field of “neuroethics” has enjoyed remarkable public support within neuroscience. For instance, since 2006 the Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience has h...
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  3.  10
    Closed-Loop Neuromodulation and Self-Perception in Clinical Treatment of Refractory Epilepsy.Tobias Haeusermann, Cailin R. Lechner, Kristina Celeste Fong, Alissa Bernstein Sideman, Agnieszka Jaworska, Winston Chiong & Daniel Dohan - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 14 (1):32-44.
    Background: Newer “closed-loop” neurostimulation devices in development could, in theory, induce changes to patients’ personalities and self-perceptions. Empirically, however, only limited data of patient and family experiences exist. Responsive neurostimulation (RNS) as a treatment for refractory epilepsy is the first approved and commercially available closed-loop brain stimulation system in clinical practice, presenting an opportunity to observe how conceptual neuroethical concerns manifest in clinical treatment.Methods: We conducted ethnographic research at a single academic medical center with an active RNS treatment program and (...)
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  4. Brain death without definitions.Winston Chiong - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (6):20-30.
    : Most of the world now accepts the idea, first proposed four decades ago, that death means "brain death." But the idea has always been open to criticism because it doesn't square with all of our intuitions about death. In fact, none of the possible definitions of death quite works. Death, perhaps surprisingly, eludes definition, and "brain death" can be accepted only as a refinement of what is in fact a fuzzy concept.
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  5.  22
    Brain Death without Definitions.Winston Chiong - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (6):20.
    Most of the world now accepts the idea, first proposed four decades ago, that death means “brain death.” But the idea has always been open to criticism because it doesn't square with all of our intuitions about death. In fact, none of the possible definitions of death quite works. Death, perhaps surprisingly, eludes definition, and “brain death” can be accepted only as a refinement of what is in fact a fuzzy concept.
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  6.  66
    The real problem with equipoise.Winston Chiong - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):37 – 47.
    The equipoise requirement in clinical research demands that, if patients are to be randomly assigned to one of two interventions in a clinical trial, there must be genuine doubt about which is better. This reflects the traditional view that physicians must never knowingly compromise the care of their patients, even for the sake of future patients. Equipoise has proven to be deeply problematic, especially in the Third World. Some recent critics have argued against equipoise on the grounds that clinical research (...)
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  7.  5
    Supported Decision-Making for People with Dementia Should Focus on Their Values.Winston Chiong & Agnieszka Jaworska - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (11):19-21.
    In their thoughtful and rigorous article, Peterson and colleagues extend an account of supported decision-making that was originally developed for people with static cognitive impairments, t...
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  8.  25
    Proceedings of the Eighth Annual Deep Brain Stimulation Think Tank: Advances in Optogenetics, Ethical Issues Affecting DBS Research, Neuromodulatory Approaches for Depression, Adaptive Neurostimulation, and Emerging DBS Technologies.Vinata Vedam-Mai, Karl Deisseroth, James Giordano, Gabriel Lazaro-Munoz, Winston Chiong, Nanthia Suthana, Jean-Philippe Langevin, Jay Gill, Wayne Goodman, Nicole R. Provenza, Casey H. Halpern, Rajat S. Shivacharan, Tricia N. Cunningham, Sameer A. Sheth, Nader Pouratian, Katherine W. Scangos, Helen S. Mayberg, Andreas Horn, Kara A. Johnson, Christopher R. Butson, Ro’ee Gilron, Coralie de Hemptinne, Robert Wilt, Maria Yaroshinsky, Simon Little, Philip Starr, Greg Worrell, Prasad Shirvalkar, Edward Chang, Jens Volkmann, Muthuraman Muthuraman, Sergiu Groppa, Andrea A. Kühn, Luming Li, Matthew Johnson, Kevin J. Otto, Robert Raike, Steve Goetz, Chengyuan Wu, Peter Silburn, Binith Cheeran, Yagna J. Pathak, Mahsa Malekmohammadi, Aysegul Gunduz, Joshua K. Wong, Stephanie Cernera, Aparna Wagle Shukla, Adolfo Ramirez-Zamora, Wissam Deeb, Addie Patterson, Kelly D. Foote & Michael S. Okun - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15:644593.
    We estimate that 208,000 deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices have been implanted to address neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders worldwide. DBS Think Tank presenters pooled data and determined that DBS expanded in its scope and has been applied to multiple brain disorders in an effort to modulate neural circuitry. The DBS Think Tank was founded in 2012 providing a space where clinicians, engineers, researchers from industry and academia discuss current and emerging DBS technologies and logistical and ethical issues facing the field. (...)
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  9.  11
    Understanding Advance Directives as a Component of Advance Care Planning.Kristina Celeste Fong & Winston Chiong - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (8):67-69.
    Volume 20, Issue 8, August 2020, Page 67-69.
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  10.  5
    A Theory of Bioethics by David DeGrazia and Joseph Millum (review).Colin Hoy & Winston Chiong - 2023 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 33 (3):321-325.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Reviewed by:A Theory of Bioethics by David DeGrazia and Joseph MillumColin Hoy (bio) and Winston Chiong (bio)Review of David DeGrazia and Joseph Millum, A Theory of Bioethics (Cambridge University Press, 2021)David DeGrazia and Joseph Millum’s A Theory of Bioethics 2021 arrives at a curious time for an ambitious effort at systematic theory construction, seemingly out of step with bioethical fashion. At the same time, a prominent group of philosophical (...)
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  11.  28
    Industry-to-physician marketing and the cost of prescription drugs.Winston Chiong - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):28 – 29.
  12.  6
    Reply to Bernat.Winston Chiong - 2013 - In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. Wiley. pp. 25--399.
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  13.  14
    Response to Commentators on “The Real Problem with Equipoise”.Winston Chiong - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):W42-W45.
    I am glad to have this opportunity to continue a conversation with authors from whom I have learned so much. In the interest of space I will focus my own remarks on points where I disagree with the...
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  14.  3
    Using Neuroscientific and Clinical Context to Assess and Manage Changes in Core Personal Traits Caused by Deep Brain Stimulation.Colin W. Hoy, Simon J. Little & Winston Chiong - 2023 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 14 (3):310-312.
    Recent debate has arisen in the neuroethics literature on the extent to which deep brain stimulation (DBS) may cause changes to core personal traits. This has prompted calls for more empirical data...
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