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  1. A Political Account of Corporate Moral Responsibility.Wim Dubbink & Jeffery Smith - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):223 - 246.
    Should we conceive of corporations as entities to which moral responsibility can be attributed? This contribution presents what we will call a political account of corporate moral responsibility. We argue that in modern, liberal democratic societies, there is an underlying political need to attribute greater levels of moral responsibility to corporations. Corporate moral responsibility is essential to the maintenance of social coordination that both advances social welfare and protects citizens' moral entitlements. This political account posits a special capacity of self-governance (...)
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  2.  53
    Understanding the Role of Moral Principles in Business Ethics: A Kantian Perspective.Jeffery Smith & Wim Dubbink - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (2):205-231.
    ABSTRACT:Does effective moral judgment in business ethics rely upon the identification of a suitable set of moral principles? We address this question by examining a number of criticisms of the role that principles can play in moral judgment. Critics claim that reliance on principles requires moral agents to abstract themselves from actual circumstances, relationships and personal commitments in answering moral questions. This is said to enforce an artificial uniformity in moral judgment. We challenge these critics by developing an account of (...)
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  3.  53
    The Fragile Structure of Free-Market Society: The Radical Implications of Corporate Social Responsibility.Wim Dubbink - 2004 - Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (1):23-46.
    In this article thinking on corporate social responsibility is compared with the dominant political theory of the market: theneoclassical theory. The comparison shows that thinking on CSR fundamentally collides with that theory. For example, their respectivenormative views on man are incompatible, as are their respective views on the modus operandi of the market. Given that CSR is desirable it follows that a new political theory of the market is needed. This article suggests some initial steps toward developing that new political (...)
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  4.  57
    Twenty years of european business ethics – past developments and future concerns.Luc van Liedekerke & Wim Dubbink - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):273-280.
    Over the past 20 years business ethics in Europe witnessed a remarkable growth. Today business ethics is faced with two challenges. The first comes from the social sciences and consultants who have both reclaimed the topics of business ethics, regretfully often at the loss of the proper ethical perspective. The second comes from the remarkable rise of corporate social responsibility which has pushed aside the mainstream business ethics methodology with its emphasis on moral deliberation by the individual. These challenges can (...)
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  5.  36
    The Bystander in Commercial Life: Obliged by Beneficence or Rescue?Wim Dubbink - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 149 (1):1-13.
    Liberalist thinking argues that moral agents have a right to pursue an ordinary life. It also insists that moral agent can be bystanders. A bystander is involved with morally bad states of affairs in the sense that they are bound by moral duty, but for a non-blameworthy reason. A common view on the morality of commercial life argues that commercial agents cannot and ought not to assume the status of bystander, when confronted with child labor, pollution, or other overwhelmingly big (...)
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  6.  47
    CSR, Transparency and the Role of Intermediate Organisations.Wim Dubbink, Johan Graafland & Luc van Liedekerke - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):391 - 406.
    Transparency is a crucial condition to implement a CSR policy based on the reputation mechanism. The central question of this contribution is how a transparency policy ought to be organised in order to enhance the CSR behaviour of companies. Governments endorsing CSR as a new means of governance have different strategies to foster CSR transparency. In this paper we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of two conventional policy strategies: the facilitation policy and the command and control strategy. Using three criteria (...)
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  7.  50
    Rethinking the Purity of Moral Motives in Business: Kant Against Moral Purism.Wim Dubbink & Luc van Liedekerke - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (3):379-393.
    Moral purism is a commonly held view on moral worthiness and how to identify it in concrete cases. Moral purists long for a moral world in which (business) people—at least sometimes—act morally worthy, but in concrete cases they systematically discount good deeds as grounded in self-interest. Moral purism evokes moral cynicism. Moral cynicism is a problem, both in society at large and the business world. Moral cynicism can be fought by refuting moral purism. This article takes issue with moral purism. (...)
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  8.  22
    Twenty Years of European Business Ethics – Past Developments and Future Concerns.Luc Van Liedekerke & Wim Dubbink - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):273-280.
    Over the past 20 years business ethics in Europe witnessed a remarkable growth. Today business ethics is faced with two challenges. The first comes from the social sciences and consultants who have both reclaimed the topics of business ethics, regretfully often at the loss of the proper ethical perspective. The second comes from the remarkable rise of corporate social responsibility which has pushed aside the mainstream business ethics methodology with its emphasis on moral deliberation by the individual. These challenges can (...)
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  9.  18
    CSR, Transparency and the Role of Intermediate Organisations.Wim Dubbink, Johan Graafland & Luc Liedekerke - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):391-406.
    Transparency is a crucial condition to implement a CSR policy based on the reputation mechanism. The central question of this contribution is how a transparency policy ought to be organised in order to enhance the CSR behaviour of companies. Governments endorsing CSR as a new means of governance have different strategies to foster CSR transparency. In this paper we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of two conventional policy strategies: the facilitation policy and the command and control strategy. Using three criteria (...)
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  10.  41
    Grounding Positive Duties in Commercial Life.Wim Dubbink & Luc Van Liedekerke - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (4):527-539.
    For years business ethics has limited the moral duties of enterprises to negative duties. Over the last decade it has been argued that positive duties also befall commercial agents, at least when confronted with large scale public problems and when governments fail. The argument that enterprises have positive duties is often grounded in the political nature of commercial life. It is argued that agents must sometimes take over governmental responsibilities. The German republican tradition argues along these lines as does Nien-Hé (...)
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  11.  50
    A Moral Grounding of the Duty to Further Justice in Commercial Life.Wim Dubbink - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (1):27-45.
    This paper argues that economic agents, including corporations, have the duty to further justice, not just a duty merely to comply with laws and do their share. The duty to further justice is the requirement to assist in the establishment of just arrangements when they do not exist in society. The paper is grounded in liberal theory and draws heavily on one liberal theorist, Kant. We show that the duty to further justice must be interpreted as a duty of virtue (...)
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  12.  28
    On the Duties of Commission in Commercial Life. A Kantian Criticism of Moral Institutionalism.Wim Dubbink & Bert van de Ven - 2012 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):221 - 238.
    In latter-day discussions on corporate morality, duties of commission are fiercely debated. Moral institutionalists argue that duties of commission—such as a duty of assistance—overstep the boundaries of moral duty owed by economic agents. " Moral institutionalism" is a newly coined term for a familiar position on market morality. It maintains that market morality ought to be restricted, excluding all duties of commission. Neo-Classical thinkers such as Baumol and Homann defend it most eloquently. They underpin their position with concerns that go (...)
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  13.  38
    A Neo-Kantian Foundation of Corporate Social Responsibility.Wim Dubbink & Luc van Liedekerke - 2009 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (2):117 - 136.
    'Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is conceptualized in many ways. We argue that one cannot be indifferent about the issue of its conceptualization. In terms of methodology, our position is that any conceptual discussion must embed CSR in political theory. With regard to substance, we link up with the discussion on whether CSR must be defined on the basis of a tripartite or a quadripartite division of business responsibilities. We share A. B. Carroll's intuition that a quadripartite division is called for (...)
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  14.  14
    A Neo-Kantian foundation of Corporate Social Responsibility.Wim Dubbink & Luc Liedekerke - 2009 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (2):117-136.
    Abstract‘Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is conceptualized in many ways. We argue that one cannot be indifferent about the issue of its conceptualization. In terms of methodology, our position is that any conceptual discussion must embed CSR in political theory. With regard to substance, we link up with the discussion on whether CSR must be defined on the basis of a tripartite or a quadripartite division of business responsibilities. We share A.B. Carroll’s intuition that a quadripartite division is called for as (...)
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  15.  34
    Is Competition Law an Impediment to CSR?Wim Dubbink & Frans Paul van der Putten - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):381 - 395.
    This paper provides an empirical case study of the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the new competition regulation in the Netherlands. The leading question in this case study is whether the new institutional arrangement has allowed for the possibility that reasonable exceptions can be made to the principle that inter-firm cooperation is prohibited. That is to say: does the new institutional arrangement allow for the possibility of 'well organized but not 'perfect' markets'? The investigation focuses on the Netherlands, (...)
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  16.  43
    Democracy and Private Discretion in Business.Wim Dubbink - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (1):37-66.
    Some critics raise moral objections against corporate social responsibility on account of its supposedly undemocratic nature. Theyargue that it is hard to reconcile democracy with the private discretion that always accompanies the discharge of responsibilities that are not judicially enforceable. There are two ways of constructing this argument: the “perfect-market argument” and the “social-power argument.” This paper demonstrates that the perfect-market argument is untenable and that the social-power argument is sometimes valid. It also asserts that the proponents of the perfect-market (...)
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  17.  7
    Is Competition Law an Impediment to CSR?Wim Dubbink & Frans Putten - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):381-395.
    This paper provides an empirical case study of the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and the new competition regulation in the Netherlands. The leading question in this case study is whether the new institutional arrangement has allowed for the possibility that reasonable exceptions can be made to the principle that inter-firm cooperation is prohibited. That is to say: does the new institutional arrangement allow for the possibility of `well organized but not `perfect’ markets’? The investigation focuses on the Netherlands, (...)
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  18.  24
    Kant on Lying in Extreme Situations.Wim Dubbink - 2023 - Kant Studien 114 (4):680-709.
    A crucial issue in normative ethics concerns the morality of lying. Kant defends the view that the duty to not lie does not allow for any exceptions in practical judgments: it never is a person’s right or duty to lie. Many people abhor this view. Kantians have tried to make sense of Kant’s view (and save Kantian moral philosophy) by suggesting Kantian interpretations that are less strict. I reject the attempts to nuance the strictness of Kant’s view. I break new (...)
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  19.  17
    Transparency Gained, Morality Lost.Wim Dubbink - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (2):287-313.
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    Transparency Gained, Morality Lost.Wim Dubbink - 2007 - Business and Society Review 112 (2):287-313.
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  21.  16
    Editorial to Book Symposium.Wim Dubbink & Noah Lemos - 2023 - The Journal of Ethics 27 (2):117-117.
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  22.  9
    Different Views on the Social Responsibility of Corporations.Willem van der Deijl & Wim Dubbink - 2023 - In Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl (eds.), Business Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 111-133.
    This chapter describes the concept Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in detail. We define CSR as the moral responsibility that companies have that goes beyond the bare minimum (abiding by minimal market morality), but that is nevertheless morally required. Because CSR is required, and not optional, it is different from philanthropy. The first part of this chapter presents the position of the proponents of CSR but also a view that denies that corporations are morally required to do more than the bare (...)
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  23. Het nut en de charme van omwegen. Popmuziek en authenticiteit.René Boomkens & Wim Dubbink - 1999 - Krisis 76:9-21.
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  24.  18
    Business Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction.Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl (eds.) - 2023 - Springer Nature Switzerland.
    This textbook not only provides the student with a solid foundation in ethics, but introduces students to the most important themes relevant to business today. Issues such as human rights violation down in the supply chain, the effect business has on nature and the environment, and inclusiveness are each discussed in separate chapters, which discuss their importance, but also their challenges. While there are numerous business ethics textbooks, few take a philosophical approach to business ethics. However, without introducing philosophical ethics, (...)
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    Corporate Responsibility and the Morality of the Market.Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl - 2023 - In Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl (eds.), Business Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 87-110.
    This chapter deals with the question to what extent market participants can have moral responsibilities. It starts with a discussion on the nature of responsibility, and then raises the question whether organizations, such as companies can bear responsibility (at all). While some philosophers have been skeptical, we list some reasons to think that companies can be moral agents. Subsequently, we discuss whether companies actually should assume moral responsibilities. There are a number of commonly heard arguments about why companies should or (...)
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  26. Democratie-theorie en de milieuproblematiek - Het is vooral de democratie-theorie, niet zozeer de democratie zelf, die het moeilijk heeft met de milieuproblematiek.Wim Dubbink - 1996 - Filosofie En Praktijk 15:143-164.
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  27.  5
    Liegen en het genadeoordeel bij Kant.Wim Dubbink - 2022 - Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 114 (2):152-164.
    Amsterdam University Press is a leading publisher of academic books, journals and textbooks in the Humanities and Social Sciences. Our aim is to make current research available to scholars, students, innovators, and the general public. AUP stands for scholarly excellence, global presence, and engagement with the international academic community.
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  28.  4
    Morality: When Does it Come into Play?Wim Dubbink - 2023 - In Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl (eds.), Business Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 9-38.
    What is morality about? This chapter explores morality by distinguishing between its formal object and its material object. Formally speaking morality concerns (the evaluation of) human (inter)action insofar as it is desired or required. It is distinguished from other normative evaluations by its focus on things that are fundamentally desirable or required. In terms of contents or its material object four contexts are described in which moral issues arise: (i) when fundamental (human) rights come into play; (ii) when question about (...)
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  29.  7
    The Grounding of Ethics and Business Ethics.Wim Dubbink - 2023 - In Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl (eds.), Business Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 39-66.
    Is morality not relativistic and without ground? A big difference between almost any other culture and our modern culture is that people often are confronted with skeptical questions about the grounding and the meaning of morality. Even people who affirm morality’s importance find it hard to reply to the moral skeptic’s questions. That is why an introduction into business ethics must devote attention to the ground and meaning of morality. In view of morality’s meaning, we discuss two ways in which (...)
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  30.  6
    What Is Business Ethics?Wim Dubbink - 2023 - In Wim Dubbink & Willem van der Deijl (eds.), Business Ethics: A Philosophical Introduction. Springer Nature Switzerland. pp. 1-8.
    This chapter introduces business ethics as a subdiscipline of ethics. Ethics concerns human (inter)action insofar as it relates to what is desirable or required. Business ethics is the subdiscipline that deals with all issues of business that are directly or indirectly related to human actions, interactions or the consequences thereof. The chapter explains what business ethics is about by contextualizing it within the discipline philosophy. The latter is defined as thinking about thinking.
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  31.  18
    Kantian Business Ethics: Critical Perspectives, edited by Denis G. Arnold and Jared D. Harris. Northhampton, MA: Edward Elgar, 2012. 196pp. Index. ISBN: 978-1-78100-495-1. [REVIEW]Wim Dubbink - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (3):475-478.
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