Results for 'William O. Bearden'

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  1.  58
    Ethical Values and Long-term Orientation.Jennifer L. Nevins, William O. Bearden & Bruce Money - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 71 (3):261-274.
    Lapses in ethical conduct by those in corporate and public authority worldwide have given business researchers and practitioners alike cause to re-examine the antecedents to personal ethical values. We explore the relationship between ethical values and an individual’s long-term orientation or LTO, defined as the degree to which one plans for and considers the future, as well as values traditions of the past. Our study also examines the role of work ethic and conservative attitudes in the formation of a person’s (...)
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  2.  19
    Procedural and Distributive Fairness: Determinants of Overall Price Fairness.Jodie L. Ferguson, Pam Scholder Ellen & William O. Bearden - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 121 (2):217-231.
    The present research isolates the fairness assessment of the process used by the retailer to set a price, as well as the distributive fairness of the price compared to the price that others are offered, and examines the combined effect of procedural fairness and distributive fairness on overall price fairness. Two experimental studies examine procedural and distributive fairness effects on overall price fairness. In study 1, procedural fairness and distributive fairness are manipulated and found to interact to bring about overall (...)
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  3. The Stoics and their Philosophical System.William O. Stephens - 2020 - In Kelly Arenson (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy. New York, NY, USA: Routledge. pp. 22-34.
    An overview of the ancient philosophers and their philosophical system (divided into the fields of logic, physics, and ethics) comprising the living, organic, enduring, and evolving body of interrelated ideas identifiable as the Stoic perspective.
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  4.  12
    Stoic Ethics: Epictetus and Happiness as Freedom.William O. Stephens - 2007 - London, UK: Continuum.
    The impact of Stoicism on Roman culture and early Christianity was considerable. Unfortunately, little survives of the early writings on Stoicism. Our knowledge of it comes largely from a few later Stoics. In this unique book, William O. Stephens explores the moral philosophy of the late Stoic Epictetus, a former slave and dynamic Stoic teacher. His philosophy, as recorded by one of his students, is the most earnest and most compelling defense of ancient Stoicism that exists. Epictetus' teachings dramatically (...)
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  5. Epictetus on How the Stoic Sage Loves.William O. Stephens - 1996 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 14:193-210.
    I show that in Epictetus’ view (1) the wise man genuinely loves (στέργειv) and is affectionate (φιλόστoργoς) to his family and friends; (2) only the Stoic wise man is, properly speaking, capable of loving—that is, he alone actually has the power to love; and (3) the Stoic wise man loves in a robustly rational way which excludes passionate, sexual, ‘erotic’ love (’έρως). In condemning all ’έρως as objectionable πάθoς Epictetus stands with Cicero and with the other Roman Stoics, Seneca and (...)
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  6. Stoicism and Food.William O. Stephens - 2018 - Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics.
    The ancient Stoics believed that virtue is the only true good and as such both necessary and sufficient for happiness. Accordingly, they classified food as among the things that are neither good nor bad but "indifferent." These "indifferents" included health, illness, wealth, poverty, good and bad reputation, life, death, pleasure, and pain. How one deals with having or lacking these things reflects one’s virtue or vice and thus determines one’s happiness or misery. So, while the Stoics held that food in (...)
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  7. Stoicism and Food Ethics.William O. Stephens - 2022 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 9 (1):105-124.
    The norms of simplicity, convenience, unfussiness, and self-control guide Diogenes the Cynic, Zeno of Citium, Chrysippus, Seneca, Musonius Rufus, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius in approaching food. These norms generate the precept that meat and dainties are luxuries, so Stoics should eschew them. Considerations of justice, environmental harm, anthropogenic global climate change, sustainability, food security, feminism, harm to animals, personal health, and public health lead contemporary Stoics to condemn the meat industrial complex, debunk carnism, and select low input, plant-based foods.
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  8.  31
    Marcus Aurelius: A Guide for the Perplexed.William O. Stephens - 2012 - London, UK: Bloomsbury (Continuum).
    This book is a clear and concise introduction to the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. His one major surviving work, often titled 'meditations' but literally translated simply as 'to himself', is a series of short, sometimes enigmatic reflections divided seemingly arbitrarily into twelve books and apparently written only to be read by him. For these reasons Marcus is a particularly difficult thinker to understand. His musings, framed as 'notes to self' or 'memoranda', are the exhortations of an earnest, conscientious Stoic (...)
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  9. Fake meat.William O. Stephens - 2018 - Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics.
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  10. Refugees, Exiles, and Stoic Cosmopolitanism.William O. Stephens - 2018 - Journal of Religion and Society 16:73-91.
    The Roman imperial Stoics were familiar with exile. This paper argues that the Stoics’ view of being a refugee differed sharply from their view of what is owed to refugees. A Stoic adopts the perspective of a cosmopolitēs, a “citizen of the world,” a rational being everywhere at home in the universe. Virtue can be cultivated and practiced in any locale, so being a refugee is an “indifferent” that poses no obstacle to happiness. Other people are our fellow cosmic citizens, (...)
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  11. Circling the square: On Greimas's semiotics.William O. Hendricks - 1989 - Semiotica 75 (1/2):95-122.
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  12. Midwest Stoicism, Agrarianism, and Environmental Virtue Ethics: Interdisciplinary Approaches.William O. Stephens - 2022 - In Ian Smith & Matt Ferkany (eds.), Environmental Ethics in the Midwest: Interdisciplinary Approaches. Michigan State University Press. pp. 1-42.
    First, the thorny problem of locating the Midwest is treated. Second, the ancient Stoics’ understanding of nature is proposed as a fertile field of ecological wisdom. The significance of nature in Stoicism is explained. Stoic philosophers (big-S Stoics) are distinguished from stoical non-philosophers (small-s stoics). Nature’s lessons for living a good Stoic life are drawn. Are such lessons too theoretical to provide practical guidance? This worry is addressed by examining the examples of Cincinnatus and Cato the Elder—ancient Romans lauded for (...)
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  13.  25
    Behaviorism and Logical Positivism: A Reassessment of the Alliance.William O. Donohue - 1991 - Noûs 25 (3):383-386.
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  14. Discourse analysis as a semiotic endeavor.William O. Hendricks - 1988 - Semiotica 72 (1-2):97-124.
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  15.  39
    Teleology and Modernity.William Gibson, Dan O'Brien & Marius Turda (eds.) - 2019 - New York, NY: Routledge.
    "The main and original contribution of this volume is to offer a discussion of teleology through the prism of religion, philosophy and history. The goal is to incorporate teleology within discussions across these three disciplines rather than restrict it to one as is customarily the case. The chapters cover a wide range of topics, from individual teleologies to collective ones; ideas put forward by the French aristocrat Arthur de Gobineau and the Scottish philosopher David Hume, by the Anglican theologian and (...)
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  16.  33
    Quasi-Aristotelians and Proto-Scotists.William O. Duba - 2017 - Vivarium 55 (1-3):60-84.
    In a seminal article, Simo Knuuttila and Anja Inkeri Lehtinen drew attention to a “curious doctrine” holding that contradictories can be true at the same temporal instant, and identified the major defenders of the doctrine as John Baconthorpe, Landolfo Caracciolo, and Hugh of Novocastro. Normann Kretzmann later asserted as fact the suggestion by Knuuttila and Inkeri Lehtinen that the doctrine comes from a misreading of a passage from Aristotle’s Physics. In fact, a study of the relevant texts reveals that Hugh (...)
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  17. Refugees, Stoicism, and Cosmic Citizenship.William O. Stephens - 2020 - Pallas: Revue d'Etudes Antiques 112:289-307.
    The Roman imperial Stoics were familiar with exile. I argue that the Stoics’ view of being a refugee differed sharply from their view of what is owed to refugees. A Stoic adopts the perspective of a cosmopolitēs, a ‘citizen of the world’, a rational being everywhere at home in the universe. Virtue can be cultivated and practiced in any locale, so being a refugee is an ‘indifferent’ that poses no obstacle to happiness. But other people are our fellow cosmic citizens (...)
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  18. The Simile of the Talus in Cicero De Finibus 3.54.William O. Stephens & Brian S. Hook - 1996 - Classical Philology 91 (1):59-61.
    Two principal questions are addressed: In De Finibus 3.54 what position does Cicero imagine the talus to fall and lie? How does this talus simile shed light on the problematic relationship between the Stoics’ doctrine of ‘preferred indifferents’ and their definition of the Good as virtue?
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  19. Stoic ethics.William O. Stephens - 2004 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The tremendous influence Stoicism has exerted on ethical thought from early Christianity through Immanuel Kant and into the twentieth century is rarely understood and even more rarely appreciated. Throughout history, Stoic ethical doctrines have both provoked harsh criticisms and inspired enthusiastic defenders. The Stoics defined the goal in life as living in agreement with nature. Humans, unlike all other animals, are constituted by nature to develop reason as adults, which transforms their understanding of themselves and their own true good. The (...)
     
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  20.  8
    Fragmentarium.William O. Duba - 2019 - Das Mittelalter 24 (1):221-223.
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  21.  11
    Landolfo Caracciolo, ‘In tertium librum Sententiarum’, d. 40, q. unica.William O. Duba & Chris Schabel - 2016 - In Thomas Jeschke & Andreas Speer (eds.), Schüler und Meister. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 366-370.
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  22.  12
    Masters and Bachelors at Paris in 1319: The lectio finalis of Landolfo Caracciolo, OFM.William O. Duba - 2016 - In Thomas Jeschke & Andreas Speer (eds.), Schüler und Meister. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 315-365.
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  23.  13
    What's Love Got to Do with It?William O. Stephens - 2010-09-24 - In Fritz Allhoff, Michael Bruce & Robert M. Stewart (eds.), College Sex ‐ Philosophy for Everyone. Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 75–90.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Epicureans and Pleasure Freedom from Anxiety and Types of Desires Sex, Shoes, and the Needs of College Students The Dangers of Sex Sex and Sensibility Romance, Beautiful Illusions, and Sound Minds Skip the Sex and Keep the Friend.
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  24.  8
    Worship and the Lord’s Supper in Assemblies of God, and other selected Pentecostal churches in Nigeria.Williams O. Mbamalu - 2015 - HTS Theological Studies 71 (3).
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  25. If friendship hurts, an Epicurean deserts : a reply to Andrew Mitchell.William O. Stephens - 2011 - In Adrianne Leigh McEvoy (ed.), Sex, Love, and Friendship: Studies of the Society for the Philosophy of Sex and Love, 1993-2003. New York, NY: Rodopi.
     
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  26.  29
    The Ethics of the Stoic Epictetus: An English Translation, Revised Edition.William O. Stephens - 2021 - New York, NY, USA: Peter Lang.
    This text remains the only English translation of Bonhöffer’s classic, definitive examination of Epictetus’s ethics. Thorough, knowledgeable, perceptive, and accessible, the unity of this book and its thematic presentation make it an invaluable resource for both scholars and general readers eager to apply Stoic thinking in their daily lives. The translation is crisp, clear, consistent, and very readable. Careful attention to the details and nuances of the German as well as the Greek of Epictetus make this an excellent achievement. This (...)
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  27.  8
    The Person: Readings in Human Nature.William O. Stephens (ed.) - 2006 - Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458, USA: Pearson.
    The vitally important concept of the "person" is featured in this anthology of readings from the history of Western philosophy. This text which is philosophically more serious yet still reader-friendly, offers a variety of authors and a wide historical scope in the Philosophy of Human Nature market that generally neglects this topic.
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  28.  6
    Commentary on “The Order of Teaching and Learning.”.William O. Martin - 1968 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 42:226-227.
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  29.  18
    Five Arguments for Vegetarianism.William O. Stephens - 1994 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (4):25-39.
    Five different arguments for vegetarianism are discussed: the system of meat production deprives poor people of food to provide meat for the wealthy, thus violating the principle of distributive justice; the world livestock industry causes great and manifold ecological destruction; meat-eating cultures and societal oppression of women are intimately linked and so feminism and vegetarianism must both be embraced to transform our patriarchal culture; both utilitarian and rights-based reasoning lead to the conclusion that raising and slaughtering animals is immoral, and (...)
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  30. The Relationships among the Gospels: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue.William O. Walker - 1978
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  31.  5
    Living with Iran.William O. Beeman - 1987 - Ethics and International Affairs 1:85-96.
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  32. Marcus Aurelius.William O. Stephens - 2005 - In Patricia F. O'Grady (ed.), Meet the philosophers of Ancient Greece: everything you always wanted to know about ancient Greek philosophy but didn't know who to ask. Aldershot, UK: Ashgate. pp. 211-213.
    How putrid is the matter which underlies everything. Water, dust, bones, stench. Again, fine marbles are calluses of the earth; gold and silver, its sediments; our clothes, animal-hair; their purple, blood from a shellfish. Our very breath is something similar and changes from this to that. Meditations, 9 36).
     
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  33.  12
    Stoic Naturalism, Rationalism, and Ecology.William O. Stephens - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (3):275-286.
    Cheney’s claim that there is a subtextual affinity between ancient Stoicism and deep ecology is historically unfounded, conceptually unsupported, and misguided from a scholarly viewpoint. His criticisms of Stoic thought are thus merely ad hominem diatribe. A proper examination of the central ideas of Stoic ethics reveals the coherence and insightfulness of Stoic naturalism and rationalism. While not providing the basis for a contemporary environmental ethic, Stoicism, nonetheless, contains some very fruitful ethical concepts.
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  34.  4
    "A Woman's Thought Runs Before Her Actions": Vows as Speech Acts in As You Like It.William O. Scott - 2006 - Philosophy and Literature 30 (2):528-539.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:"A Woman's Thought Runs Before Her Actions":Vows as Speech Acts in As You Like ItWilliam O. ScottAbout a decade ago Susanne Wofford discussed As You Like It from the viewpoint that Rosalind uses a "proxy," her guise as Ganymede, in uttering "the performative language necessary to accomplish deeds such as marriage." 1 Thus Wofford complicated and qualified the success-oriented assumptions about performative usage of language as envisioned in Austin's (...)
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  35.  22
    A Madman of Ch'u: The Chinese Myth of Loyalty and Dissent.William O. Hennessey & Laurence A. Schneider - 1983 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 103 (3):636.
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  36.  53
    Lukrez, der Kepos und die Stoiker: Untersuchungen zur Schule Epikurs und zu den Quellen von De rerum natura.William O. Stephens - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):461-463.
    Schmidt's main thesis is that Lucretius did not exclusively use the writings of Epicurus in composing De rerurn natura, and that it is emphatically doubtful that Epicurus was even his principal source. Rather, Schmidt argues that it is virtually certain that early Epicurean writings are used in several passages, and that they are the most probable sources for the whole poem. Schmidt sees Lucretius as closely caught up with the current polemics between the Stoic and Epicurean schools of his time. (...)
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  37. College bans Nietzsche quote on prof's door.William O. Stephens - unknown
    Kerry Laird, a literature and composition professor who does not have tenure, is in his first year at Temple. He said that, as a student and instructor, he always enjoyed the way professors use their office doors to reveal bits of their personality and to challenge students with cartoons, artwork, and various phrases. So when he started at Temple, he put a cartoon up showing Smokey the Bear, a girl scout and a boy scout and the tag line: “Kids — (...)
     
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  38. Stoic Lessons in Liberation: Epictetus as Educator.William O. Stephens - manuscript
    My project examines the pedagogical approach of the Stoic Epictetus by focusing on seven vital lessons he imparts. This study will deepen our understanding of his vocation as a Stoic educator striving to free his students from the fears and foolishness that hold happiness hostage. These lessons are (1) how freedom, integrity, self-respect, and happiness interrelate; (2) real versus fake tragedy and real versus fake heroism; (3) the instructive roles that various animals play in Stoic education; (4) athleticism, sport, and (...)
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  39.  16
    If Friendship Hurts, an Epicurean Deserts: A Reply to Andrew Mitchell.William O. Stephens - 2002 - Essays in Philosophy 3 (1):70-72.
    Mitchell defends the Epicurean account of friendship. I argue that since Epicureans are hedonists who hold that all pleasures are good and all pains are bad, Epicureans would desert their friends in circumstances in which standing by their friends causes them pain.
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  40.  10
    Taking Ourselves Seriously.William O. Stephens - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy, Science and Law 6 (1):5-20.
    The advances that have been made in the area of genetic technology over the past several years have caused a reflection into the grounds for emerging policy decisions that have emerged as a result of these stunning scientific breakthroughs. Inevitably, controversies have emerged as a result of these rapidly developing genetic discoveries. Recent British judicial decisions in this area have appeared to avoid directly dealing with the accompanying ethical issues. Instead they have appeared to take an ad hoc approach, by (...)
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  41.  42
    4. Aristotle in Hell and Aquinas in Heaven: Hugo de Novocastro, OFM and Durandus de Aureliaco, OP.William O. Duba - 2014 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 56:183-194.
    This notice answers two long-running questions of authorship. The first part of the notice addresses the famous question “Utrum Aristoteles sit salvatus” that survives in the manuscript Città del Vaticano, BAV, Cod. Vat. lat. 1012, a miscellany of primarily Franciscan texts. On the basis of contextual, textual and thematic parallels, the authorship of the question should be ascribed to Hugh of Neufchâteau, OFM. The second part considers the case of the Evidentiae contra Durandum, whose author, known as Durandellus, Joseph Koch (...)
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  42.  6
    Living with Iran.William O. Beeman - 1987 - Ethics International Affairs 1 (1):85-96.
    Beeman uses Islamic history to show how contentious stances have evolved towards the West and how ignorance of that history has handicapped the United States in developing effective policies towards Iran.
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  43.  9
    Performance pragmatics, neuroscience and evolution.William O. Beeman - 2010 - Pragmatics and Society 1 (1):118-137.
    This paper addresses the question question: How do individuals affect others cognitively and emotionally through performance? Performance here is broadly defined aspurposeful enactment or display behavior carried out in front of an audience. Following Alfred Schütz, Erving Goffman, Deborah Tannen and others, the paper posits that performance works through the creation of behavior that is embedded in cognitive “frames” that determine the symbolic interpretation of events. The framed event allows the performer to stimulate the emotions of the audience through pragmatically (...)
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  44.  8
    Commentary.William O. Baker - 1986 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 11 (2):27-28.
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  45. Part III. Language and Emotion: Poetry, Pragmatics and Power: 10. Language and Emotion: Paralinguistic and Performative Dimensions.William O. Beeman - 2020 - In Sonya E. Pritzker, Janina Fenigsen & James MacLynn Wilce (eds.), The Routledge handbook of language and emotion. New York, NY: Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group.
     
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  46.  10
    Anarchism, freedom, and power.William O. Reichert - 1969 - Ethics 79 (2):139-149.
  47.  1
    "A woman's thought runs before her actions": Vows as speech acts in.William O. Scott - 2006 - Philosophy and Literature 30 (2):2.
  48. Epictetus's Encheiridion: A new translation and guide to Stoic ethics.Scott Aikin & William O. Stephens - 2023 - London and New York: Bloomsbury Publishing. Edited by William O. Stephens & Epictetus.
    For anyone approaching the Encheiridion of Epictetus for the first time, this book provides a comprehensive guide to understanding a complex philosophical text. Including a full translation and clear explanatory commentaries, Epictetus's 'Encheiridion' introduces readers to a hugely influential work of Stoic philosophy. Scott Aikin and William O. Stephens unravel the core themes of Stoic ethics found within this ancient handbook. Focusing on the core themes of self-control, seeing things as they are, living according to nature, owning one's roles (...)
  49. Methodology of Narrative Structural Analysis.William O. Hendricks - 1973 - Semiotica 7 (2).
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  50.  4
    An experimental analysis of set in rote learning: retroactive inhibition as a function of changing set.William O. Jenkins & Leo Postman - 1949 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (1):69.
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