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  1. From CSR1 to CSR2 The Maturing of Business-and-Society Thought.William C. Frederick - 1994 - Business and Society 33 (2):150-164.
  2.  99
    The moral authority of transnational corporate codes.William C. Frederick - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (3):165 - 177.
    Ethical guidelines for multinational corporations are included in several international accords adopted during the past four decades. These guidelines attempt to influence the practices of multinational enterprises in such areas as employment relations, consumer protection, environmental pollution, political participation, and basic human rights. Their moral authority rests upon the competing principles of national sovereignty, social equity, market integrity, and human rights. Both deontological principles and experience-based value systems undergird and justify the primacy of human rights as the fundamental moral authority (...)
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  3.  18
    Moving to CSR.William C. Frederick - 1998 - Business and Society 37 (1):40-59.
    The study of Social Issues in Management (SIM) has exhausted its primary analytic framework based on corporate social performance (social science), business ethics (philosophy), and stakeholder theory (organizational science), and needs to move to a new paradigmatic level based on the natural sciences. Doing so would expand research horizons to include cosmological perspectives (astrophysics), evolutionary theory (biology, genetics, ecology), and non-sectarian spirituality concepts (theological naturalism, cognitive neuroscience). Absent this shift, SIM studies risk increasing irrelevance for scholars and business practitioners.
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  4.  13
    The Empirical Quest for Normative Meaning.William C. Frederick - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (2):91-98.
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  5.  46
    Creatures, Corporations, Communities, Chaos, Complexity.William C. Frederick - 1998 - Business and Society 37 (4):358-389.
    The corporation's social role is usually presented as a cultural phenomenon in which the corporation learns socially acceptable behaviors through voluntary social responsibility, government regulations/public policies, and/or acceptance of ethics principles. This article presents an alternative view of corporationcommunity relations as a natural phenomenon based on complexity-chaos theory and a biological-physical conception of corporate values. Corporation and community are depicted as interacting nonlinear adaptive systems having unpredictable futures, the corporate social role is depicted as largely indeterminate, and competing values are (...)
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  6.  31
    Pragmatism, Nature, and Norms.William C. Frederick - 2000 - Business and Society Review 105 (4):467-479.
  7.  28
    Anchoring Values in Nature.William C. Frederick - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (3):283-303.
    The dominant values of the business system-economizing and power-aggrandizing-are manifestations of natural evolutionary forces to which sociocultural meaning has been assigned. Economizing tends to slow life-negating entropic processes, while power-aggrandizement enhances them. Both economizing and power-aggrandizing work against a third (non-business) value cluster- ecologizing-which sustains community integrity. The contradictory tensions and conflicts generated among these three value clusters define the central normative issues posed by business operations. While both economizing and ecologizing are antientropic and therefore life-supporting, power augmentation, which negates (...)
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  8.  28
    Anchoring Values in Nature.William C. Frederick - 1992 - Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (3):283-303.
    The dominant values of the business system-economizing and power-aggrandizing-are manifestations of natural evolutionary forces to which sociocultural meaning has been assigned. Economizing tends to slow life-negating entropic processes, while power-aggrandizement enhances them. Both economizing and power-aggrandizing work against a third (non-business) value cluster- ecologizing-which sustains community integrity. The contradictory tensions and conflicts generated among these three value clusters define the central normative issues posed by business operations. While both economizing and ecologizing are antientropic and therefore life-supporting, power augmentation, which negates (...)
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  9.  38
    Commentary: Corporate Social Responsibility: Deep Roots, Flourishing Growth, Promising Future.William C. Frederick - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  10.  42
    One Voice? or Many?William C. Frederick - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):575-579.
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  11. Notes for a Third Millennial Manifesto.William C. Frederick - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):159-167.
    Business ethics in the new millennium will confront both new and old questions that are being transformed by the changed pace and direction of human evolution. These questions embrace human nature, values, inquiring methods, technological change, geopolitics, natural disasters, and the moral role of business in all of these. The emergence and acceptance of technosymbolic phenomena may signal a slow transition of carbon-based human life toward greater dependence upon silicon-based virtualities across a wide range ofhuman possibilities. The resultant moral issues (...)
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  12.  25
    One Voice? or Many?William C. Frederick - 1998 - Business Ethics Quarterly 8 (3):575-579.
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  13.  53
    The Evolutionary Firm and Its Moral (Dis)Contents.William C. Frederick - 2004 - The Ruffin Series of the Society for Business Ethics 4:145-176.
    The business firm, called here the Evolutionary Firm, is shown to be a phenomenon of nature. The firm’s motives, organization, productivity, strategy, and moral significance are a direct outgrowth of natural evolution. Its managers, directors, and employees are natural agents enacting and responding to biological, physical, and ecological impulses inherited over evolutionary time from ancient human ancestors. The Evolutionary Firm’s moral posture is a function of its economizing success, competitive drive, quest for market dominance, social contracting skills, and the neural (...)
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  14.  25
    The Virtual Reality of Fact vs. Value.William C. Frederick - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (2):171-173.
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  15.  18
    Seeking Common Ground: A Response to Dunfee.William C. Frederick - 2000 - Business and Society Review 105 (4):502-504.
  16.  48
    The Virtual Reality of Fact vs. Value.William C. Frederick - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (2):171-173.
  17.  27
    Evolutionary Social Contracts.William C. Frederick & David M. Wasieleski - 2002 - Business and Society Review 107 (3):283-308.
  18.  35
    General Introduction.William C. Frederick - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (2):111-112.
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  19.  10
    International Human Rights.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:284-285.
  20.  21
    An Appalachian Coda.William C. Frederick - 1999 - Business and Society 38 (2):206-211.
    This article briefly characterizes the core values of business as manifestations of natural processes. They include the values of economizing, power-aggrandizing, ecologizing, technologizing, and X-factor, with each separate value cluster a response to identifiable forces of nature. The inconsistencies and contradictions between these various value systems are reconciled by resorting to two kinds of normative phenomena: the rationality and creativity found within the techno-symbolic value cluster, and a global culture of ethics.
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  21.  19
    Coda: 1994.William C. Frederick - 1994 - Business and Society 33 (2):165-166.
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  22.  15
    Social Contract.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:224-226.
  23.  17
    A Cooperative-Coordinative Logic.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:190-191.
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  24.  17
    A Civilizational-Humanizing Logic.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:195-196.
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  25.  14
    A Combinatory Logic.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:187-188.
  26.  10
    A Cumulative Logic.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:188-189.
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  27.  8
    A Friendly Warning Label.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:171-173.
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  28.  27
    Anthropocentric Interpretations of Ecological Process.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:148-151.
  29.  38
    A New Normative Synthesis.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:263-263.
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  30.  27
    An Organizational Logic.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:192-193.
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  31.  14
    A Pragmatic Logic.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:186-187.
  32.  10
    A Progressive Logic.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:189-190.
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  33.  14
    A Response to Klein.William C. Frederick - 1993 - Business Ethics Quarterly 3 (1):63-64.
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  34.  7
    A Theory of Business Values.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:7-10.
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  35.  12
    A Unifying Logic.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:194-195.
  36.  14
    A Value-Laden Workplace.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:231-232.
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  37.  8
    Business and The Mumford Principle.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:198-200.
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  38.  15
    Business and the Moral Process.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:277-280.
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  39.  9
    Behavioral/Organizational Ethics.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:230-231.
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  40.  10
    Bibliographic Note.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics 2 (1-2):303-303.
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  41.  15
    Corporate Culture.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:84-89.
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  42.  33
    Corporate Ethics.William C. Frederick - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (1):21-23.
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  43.  15
    Competitive Economizing.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:154-157.
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  44.  7
    Corporate Ethics.William C. Frederick - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (1):21-23.
  45.  10
    Choosing Grounded Premises.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:263-266.
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  46.  10
    Common Morality.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:282-283.
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  47.  11
    Corporate Stakeholders.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:213-218.
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  48.  6
    Cultural Technology.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:179-181.
  49.  15
    Convergence Theorems.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:266-270.
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  50.  18
    Competing with Integrity.William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:285-285.
1 — 50 / 168