Results for 'William A. Lauinger'

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William Lauinger
Chestnut Hill College
  1. Eternity, Boredom, and One’s Part-Whole-Reality Conception.William A. Lauinger - 2014 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):1-28.
    Bernard Williams famously argued that eternal life is undesirable for a human because it would inevitably grow intolerably boring. I will argue against Williams and those who share his view. To make my case, I will provide an account of what staves off boredom in our current, earthly-mortal lives, and then I will draw on this account while advancing reasons for thinking that eternal life is desirable, given certain conditions. Though my response to Williams will partly overlap with some prior (...)
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  2. The Strong-Tie Requirement and Objective-List Theories of Well-Being.William A. Lauinger - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (5):953-968.
    Many philosophers with hedonistic sympathies (e.g., Mill, Sidgwick, Sumner, Feldman, Crisp, Heathwood, and Bradley) have claimed that well-being is necessarily experiential. Kagan once claimed something slightly different, saying that, although unexperienced bodily events can directly impact a person’s well-being, it is nonetheless true that any change in a person’s well-being must involve a change in her (i.e., either in her mind or in her body). Kagan elaborated by saying that a person’s well-being cannot float freely of her such that it (...)
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  3.  9
    Well‐Being and Theism: Linking Ethics to God. By William A. Lauinger. Pp. X, 198, London/NY, Continuum, 2012, £60.00. [REVIEW]Luke Penkett - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (5):850-850.
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  4. A Framework for Understanding Parental Well-Being.William Lauinger - 2015 - Philosophia 43 (3):847-868.
    Is being a parent prudentially good for one – that is to say, does it enhance one’s well-being? The social-scientific literature is curiously divided when it comes to this question. While some studies suggest that being a parent decreases most people’s well-being, other studies suggest that being a parent increases most people’s well-being. In this paper I will present a framework for thinking about the prudential benefits and costs of parenthood. Four elements are central to this framework: affect, friendship , (...)
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  5.  9
    Defending a Hybrid of Objective List and Desire Theories of Well-Being.William Lauinger - 2021 - In Measuring Well-Being: Interdisciplinary Perspectives from the Social Sciences and Humanities. New York, NY, USA: pp. 229 - 256.
    This paper extends previous work of mine on a view of human well-being that is a hybrid of objective-list theories and desire theories. Though some of what I say traverses old ground, much of what I say is new – new, that is, not in terms of ultimate conclusions, but rather in terms of (a) routes toward these ultimate conclusions and (b) certain implications of these ultimate conclusions (e.g., implications concerning the measurement of well-being). There are two different visions of (...)
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  6. The Missing-Desires Objection to Hybrid Theories of Well-Being.William Lauinger - 2013 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):270-295.
    Many philosophers have claimed that we might do well to adopt a hybrid theory of well-being: a theory that incorporates both an objective-value constraint and a pro-attitude constraint. Hybrid theories are attractive for two main reasons. First, unlike desire theories of well-being, hybrid theories need not worry about the problem of defective desires. This is so because, unlike desire theories, hybrid theories place an objective-value constraint on well-being. Second, unlike objectivist theories of well-being, hybrid theories need not worry about being (...)
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  7. Well-Being and Theism: Linking Ethics to God.William Lauinger - 2012 - Continuum.
    Well-Being and Theism is divided into two distinctive parts. The first part argues that desire-fulfillment welfare theories fail to capture the 'good' part of ‘good for’, and that objective list welfare theories fail to capture the 'for' part of ‘good for’. Then, with the aim of capturing both of these parts of ‘good for’, a hybrid theory–one which places both a value constraint and a desire constraint on well-being–is advanced. Lauinger then defends this proposition, which he calls the desire-perfectionism (...)
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  8.  25
    The Argument From Desire.William Lauinger - forthcoming - In Colin Ruloff & Peter Horban (eds.), Contemporary Arguments in Natural Theology: God and Rational Belief.
    Most of us live primarily in the everyday mode, where we have ordinary thoughts and feelings that accompany our engagement in ordinary activities such as working, eating, paying bills, driving, sleeping, exercising, and shopping. Even when we are with friends and family members, most of our thoughts, feelings, and actions are of the everyday variety. However, there are certain moments, rare and ephemeral though they may be, where the everyday mode of life is unexpectedly pierced and where some kind of (...)
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  9. The Neutralization of Draper-Style Evidential Arguments From Evil.William Lauinger - 2014 - Faith and Philosophy 31 (3):303-324.
    This paper aims to neutralize Draper-style evidential arguments from evil by defending five theses: (1) that, when those who advance these arguments use the word “evil,” they are referring, at least in large part, to ill-being; (2) that well-being and ill-being come as a pair (i.e., are essentially related); (3) that well-being and ill-being are best understood in an at least partly objectivist way; (4) that (even partial) objectivism about well-being and ill-being is best understood as implying non-naturalism about well-being (...)
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  10.  70
    The Morality-Welfare Circularity Problem.William Lauinger - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (8):1959-1981.
    Various moral theories are essentially welfare-involving in that they appeal to the promotion or the respect of well-being in accounting for the moral rightness of at least some acts. Further, various theories of well-being are essentially morality-involving in that they construe well-being in a way that essentially involves morality in some form or other. It seems that, for any moral theory that is essentially welfare-involving and that relies on a theory of well-being that is essentially morality-involving, a circularity problem may (...)
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  11.  20
    Is Law Coercive?: William A. Edmundson.William A. Edmundson - 1995 - Legal Theory 1 (1):81-111.
    That law is coercive is something we all more or less take for granted. It is an assumption so rooted in our ways of thinking that it is taken as a given of social reality, an uncontroversial datum. Because it is so regarded, it is infrequently stated, and when it is, it is stated without any hint of possible complications or qualifications. I will call this the “prereflective view,” and I want to examine it with the care it deserves.
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  12. By William A. Dembski.William A. Dembski - unknown
    I have before me a letter dated January 5, 2000 from Bradford Wilson, the executive director of the NAS. It begins, “I really enjoyed your contribution to the recent symposium in the January issue of First Things, so much so that I’ve also decided to invite you to join the NAS. Many of your fellow contributors including Robert George, Jeffrey Satinover, and Father Neuhaus are among our current members, and I think you’d find it well worth your while if you (...)
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  13.  22
    Cosmopolitan Altruism*: WILLIAM A. GALSTON.William A. Galston - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (1):118-134.
    This essay focuses on what I shall call “cosmopolitan altruism”—the motivationally effective desire to assist needy or endangered strangers. Section I describes recent research that confirms the existence of this phenomenon. Section II places it within interlocking sets of moral typologies that distinguish among forms of altruism along dimensions of scope, interests risked, motivational source, and baseline of moral judgment. Section III explores some of the relationships between altruism—a concept rooted in modern moral philosophy and Christianity—and the understanding of virtue (...)
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  14.  32
    Pluralist Constitutionalism: William A. Galston.William A. Galston - 2011 - Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (1):228-241.
    This essay explores the ways in which a broadly pluralist outlook can help illuminate longstanding issues of constitutional theory and practice. It begins with a common-sense understanding of pluralism as the diversity of observed practices within a general category. It turns out that many assumptions Americans and others often make about constitutional essentials are valid only locally but not generically. The essay then turns to pluralism in a more technical and philosophical sense—specifically, the account of value pluralism adumbrated by Isaiah (...)
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  15.  45
    Democracy and Value Pluralism: WILLIAM A. GALSTON.William A. Galston - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (1):255-268.
    My intention in this essay is to open up a question I cannot fully resolve: the relationship between democracy and value pluralism. By “value pluralism” I mean the view propounded so memorably by the late Isaiah Berlin and developed in various ways by thinkers including Stuart Hampshire, Steven Lukes, Thomas Nagel, Martha Nussbaum, Michael Stocker, Bernard Williams, Charles Taylor, John Kekes, and John Gray, among others. I shall define and discuss this view in some detail in Section III. For now, (...)
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  16.  10
    Hedonism and the Variety of Goodness: William A. Haines.William A. Haines - 2010 - Utilitas 22 (2):148-170.
    This article defends the project of giving a single pleasure-based account of goodness against what may seem a powerful challenge. Aristotle, Peter Geach and Judith Thomson have argued that there is no such thing as simply being good; there is only being a good knife or a good painting, being serene or good to eat, or being good in essence or in qualities. But I argue that these philosophers’ evidence is friendly to the hedonist project. For, I argue, hedonistic accounts (...)
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  17.  2
    To: “Surface to Subsurface Correlation of the Middle-Upper Triassic Shublik Formation Within a Revised Sequence Stratigraphic Framework,” William A. Rouse, Katherine J. Whidden, Julie A. Dumoulin, and David W. Houseknecht, Interpretation, 8, No. 2, SJ1–SJ16, Doi: 10.1190/INT-2019-0195.1. [REVIEW]William A. Rouse, Katherine J. Whidden, Julie A. Dumoulin & David W. Houseknecht - 2020 - Interpretation 8 (3):Y1-Y1.
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  18.  15
    Bochenski on the Structure of Schemes of Doctrines: WILLIAM A. CHRISTIAN.William A. Christian - 1977 - Religious Studies 13 (2):203-219.
    My object is to suggest some ways of amplifying and applying Bochenski's account, 1 in order to bring out its value for philosophical investigation of the doctrines of particular religious communities.
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  19. Realism in Political Theory.William A. Galston - 2010 - European Journal of Political Theory 9 (4):385-411.
    In recent decades, a ‘realist’ alternative to ideal theories of politics has slowly taken shape. Bringing together philosophers, political theorists, and political scientists, this countermovement seeks to reframe inquiry into politics and political norms. Among the hallmarks of this endeavor are a moral psychology that includes the passions and emotions; a robust conception of political possibility and rejection of utopian thinking; the belief that political conflict — of values as well as interests — is both fundamental and ineradicable; a focus (...)
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  20.  72
    Spheres of Justice: A Defense of Pluralism and Equality.William A. Galston - 1983 - Ethics 94 (2):329-333.
  21. A Weaker Condition for Transitivity in Probabilistic Support.William A. Roche - 2012 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 2 (1):111-118.
    Probabilistic support is not transitive. There are cases in which x probabilistically supports y , i.e., Pr( y | x ) > Pr( y ), y , in turn, probabilistically supports z , and yet it is not the case that x probabilistically supports z . Tomoji Shogenji, though, establishes a condition for transitivity in probabilistic support, that is, a condition such that, for any x , y , and z , if Pr( y | x ) > Pr( y (...)
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  22.  15
    Democracy’s Discontent: America in Search of a Public Philosophy.William A. Galston - 1996 - Filosofie En Praktijk 18 (3):210-210.
  23.  52
    Corporate Codes of Ethics and Sales Force Behavior: A Case Study. [REVIEW]William A. Weeks & Jacques Nantel - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (10):753 - 760.
    A growing public concern regarding ethical business conduct has stimulated marketing research in the ethics area. This study is the first empirical research to investigate the relationship between a code of ethics and sales force behavior. The findings present preliminary evidence that a well communicated code of ethics may be related to ethical sales force behavior. Furthermore, it appears that a sales force that is employed in such an environment can be profiled as being relatively high in job performance and (...)
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  24.  71
    Basic Emotions: A Reconstruction.William A. Mason & John P. Capitanio - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (3):238-244.
    Emotionality is a basic feature of behavior. The argument over whether the expression of emotions is based primarily on culture (constructivism, nurture) or biology (natural forms, nature) will never be resolved because both alternatives are untenable. The evidence is overwhelming that at all ages and all levels of organization, the development of emotionality is epigenetic: The organism is an active participant in its own development. To ascribe these effects to “experience” was the best that could be done for many years. (...)
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  25.  66
    Attitudes and Evaluations: A Social Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective.William A. Cunningham & Philip David Zelazo - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (3):97-104.
  26.  16
    No Free Lunch: Why Specified Complexity Cannot Be Purchased Without Intelligence.William A. Dembski - 2002 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    Darwin's greatest accomplishment was to show how life might be explained as the result of natural selection. But does Darwin's theory mean that life was unintended? William A. Dembski argues that it does not. In this book Dembski extends his theory of intelligent design. Building on his earlier work in The Design Inference (Cambridge, 1998), he defends that life must be the product of intelligent design. Critics of Dembski's work have argued that evolutionary algorithms show that life can be (...)
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  27. Liberal Pluralism: The Implications of Value Pluralism for Political Theory and Practice.William A. Galston - 2002 - Cambridge University Press.
    William Galston is a distinguished political philosopher whose work is informed by the experience of having also served from 1993–5 as President Clinton's Deputy Assistant for Domestic Policy. He is thus able to speak with an authority unique amongst political theorists about the implications of advancing certain moral and political values in practice. The foundational argument of this 2002 book is that liberalism is compatible with the value pluralism first espoused by Isaiah Berlin. William Galston defends a version (...)
     
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  28. A Reply to Cling’s “The Epistemic Regress Problem”.William A. Roche - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 159 (2):263-276.
    Andrew Cling presents a new version of the epistemic regress problem, and argues that intuitionist foundationalism, social contextualism, holistic coherentism, and infinitism fail to solve it. Cling’s discussion is quite instructive, and deserving of careful consideration. But, I argue, Cling’s discussion is not in all respects decisive. I argue that Cling’s dilemma argument against holistic coherentism fails.
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  29.  31
    Democracy’s Discontent: America in Search of a Public Philosophy.William A. Galston - 1996 - Ethics 107 (3):509-512.
  30.  5
    Liberal Purposes: Goods, Virtues, and Diversity in the Liberal State.William A. Galston - 1991 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a major contribution to the current theory of liberalism by an eminent political theorist. It challenges the views of such theorists as Rawls, Dworkin, and Ackerman who believe that the essence of liberalism is that it should remain neutral concerning different ways of life and individual conceptions of what is good or valuable. Professor Galston argues that the modern liberal state is committed to a distinctive conception of the human good, and to that end has developed characteristic (...)
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  31.  21
    John Rawls: Reticent Socialist.William A. Edmundson - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first detailed reconstruction of the late work of John Rawls, who was perhaps the most influential philosopher of the twentieth century. Rawls's 1971 treatise, A Theory of Justice, stimulated an outpouring of commentary on 'justice-as-fairness,' his conception of justice for an ideal, self-contained, modern political society. Most of that commentary took Rawls to be defending welfare-state capitalism as found in Western Europe and the United States. Far less attention has been given to Rawls's 2001 book, Justice (...)
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  32. The Design Inference: Eliminating Chance Through Small Probabilities.William A. Dembski - 1998 - Cambridge University Press.
    The design inference uncovers intelligent causes by isolating their key trademark: specified events of small probability. Just about anything that happens is highly improbable, but when a highly improbable event is also specified undirected natural causes lose their explanatory power. Design inferences can be found in a range of scientific pursuits from forensic science to research into the origins of life to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. This challenging and provocative 1998 book shows how incomplete undirected causes are for science (...)
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  33. Liberal Pluralism: The Implications of Value Pluralism for Political Theory and Practice.William A. Galston - 2003 - Political Theory 31 (6):891-896.
    William Galston is a distinguished political philosopher whose work is informed by the experience of having also served from 1993–5 as President Clinton's Deputy Assistant for Domestic Policy. He is thus able to speak with an authority unique amongst political theorists about the implications of advancing certain moral and political values in practice. The foundational argument of this 2002 book is that liberalism is compatible with the value pluralism first espoused by Isaiah Berlin. William Galston defends a version (...)
     
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  34. Michael DePaul and William Ramsey, Eds., Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and its Role in Philosophical Inquiry. [REVIEW]William A. Martin - 2000 - Philosophy in Review 20 (2):96-98.
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  35. Two Concepts of Liberalism.William A. Galston - 1995 - Ethics 105 (3):516-534.
  36.  33
    [Book Review] Liberal Purposes, Goods, Virtues, and Diversity in the Liberal State. [REVIEW]William A. GALSTON - 1992 - Ethics 103 (2):393-397.
    This book is a major contribution to the current theory of liberalism by an eminent political theorist. It challenges the views of such theorists as Rawls, Dworkin, and Ackerman who believe that the essence of liberalism is that it should remain neutral concerning different ways of life and individual conceptions of what is good or valuable. Professor Galston argues that the modern liberal state is committed to a distinctive conception of the human good, and to that end has developed characteristic (...)
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  37.  36
    Student Views of “Ethical” Issues: A Situational Analysis. [REVIEW]William A. Jones - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (3):201 - 205.
    This paper reports on selected attitudes of a sample of third-year undergraduate business students in a major urban university. The focus of the research is on respondent perceptions of certain aspects of the employee-employer relationship. Such issues as use of the company car for a personal trip, use of the company copy machine for personal copies, calling in sick when some personal time is needed, eating at the very best restaurant on a business trip and others are explored. Half of (...)
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  38.  42
    The Role of Mere Exposure Effect on Ethical Tolerance: A Two-Study Approach.William A. Weeks, Justin G. Longenecker, Joseph A. McKinney & Carlos W. Moore - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (4):281-294.
    This paper reports on the results from two studies that were conducted eight years apart with different respondents. The studies examined the role of the Mere Exposure Effect on ethical tolerance or acceptability of particular business decisions. The results from Study 1 show there is a significant difference in ethical judgment for 12 out of 16 vignettes between those who have been exposed to such situations compared to those who have not been exposed to them. In those 12 situations, those (...)
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  39.  41
    William A. Frank and Allan B. Wolter, Duns Scotus, Metaphysician.Williams Thomas - 1998 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 43 (2):125-127.
  40.  46
    The Effects of Gender and Career Stage on Ethical Judgment.William A. Weeks, Carlos W. Moore, Joseph A. McKinney & Justin G. Longenecker - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 20 (4):301 - 313.
    This article reports the findings of a survey examining if there are gender and career stage differences between male and female practitioners regarding ethical judgment. The results show that, on average, females adopted a more strict ethical stance than their male counterparts on 7 out of 19 vignettes. Males on the other hand, demonstrated a more ethical stance than their female counterparts on 2 out of 19 vignettes. The results furthermore indicate there is a significant difference in ethical judgment across (...)
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  41.  38
    AI Assistants and the Paradox of Internal Automaticity.William A. Bauer & Veljko Dubljević - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (3):303-310.
    What is the ethical impact of artificial intelligence assistants on human lives, and specifically how much do they threaten our individual autonomy? Recently, as part of forming an ethical framework for thinking about the impact of AI assistants on our lives, John Danaher claims that if the external automaticity generated by the use of AI assistants threatens our autonomy and is therefore ethically problematic, then the internal automaticity we already live with should be viewed in the same way. He takes (...)
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  42.  72
    Toward an Understanding of Cross-Cultural Ethics: A Tentative Model. [REVIEW]William A. Wines & Nancy K. Napier - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (11):831 - 841.
    In an increasingly global environment, managers face a dilemma when selecting and applying moral values to decisions in cross-cultural settings. While moral values may be similar across cultures (either in different countries or among people within a single country), their application (or ethics) to specific situations may vary. Ethics is the systematic application of moral principles to concrete problems.This paper addresses the cross-cultural ethical dilemma, proposes a tentative model for conceptualizing cross-cultural ethics, and suggests some ways in which the model (...)
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  43.  26
    A. Dee Williams 71.A. Dee Williams - forthcoming - Journal of Thought.
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  44.  60
    On the Alleged Right to Do Wrong: A Response to Waldron.William A. Galston - 1982 - Ethics 93 (2):320-324.
  45.  28
    Habituation: A Model Phenomenon for the Study of Neuronal Substrates of Behavior.Richard F. Thompson & William A. Spencer - 1966 - Psychological Review 73 (1):16-43.
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  46. William A. Wallace, "Causality and Scientific Explanation. Vol. I: Medieval and Classical Science". [REVIEW]William R. Shea - 1973 - The Thomist 37 (2):393.
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  47.  11
    AI Assistants and the Paradox of Internal Automaticity.William A. Bauer & Veljko Dubljević - 2020 - Neuroethics 13 (3):303-310.
    What is the ethical impact of artificial intelligence assistants on human lives, and specifically how much do they threaten our individual autonomy? Recently, as part of forming an ethical framework for thinking about the impact of AI assistants on our lives, John Danaher claims that if the external automaticity generated by the use of AI assistants threatens our autonomy and is therefore ethically problematic, then the internal automaticity we already live with should be viewed in the same way. He takes (...)
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  48.  12
    Human Experimentation: A Guided Step Into the Unknown.William A. Silverman - 1985 - Oxford University Press.
    Spectacular treatment disasters in recent years have made it clear that informal "let's-try-it-and-see" methods of testing new proposals are more risky now than ever before, and have led many to call for a halt to experimentation in clinical medicine. In this easy-tp-read, philosophical guide to human experimentation, William Silverman pleads for wider use of randomized clinical trials, citing many examples that show how careful trials can overturn preconceived or ill-conceived notions of a therapy's effectiveness and lead to a clearer (...)
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  49.  21
    William Ockham.William A. Frank - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 42 (4):817-818.
    This massive study makes an important contribution to the history of philosophy for two reasons. First of all, it stands as the most complete and careful philosophical analysis of Ockham's thought to date. Adams's expositions and analyses will become the gloss which generations of students will have to reckon with as they confront the text of Ockham. Secondly, this work represents an exemplary method of philosophical commentary, one that proves to be a remarkably illuminating way into the mind of a (...)
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  50.  78
    Virtuous Vs. Utilitarian Artificial Moral Agents.William A. Bauer - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-9.
    Given that artificial moral agents—such as autonomous vehicles, lethal autonomous weapons, and automated financial trading systems—are now part of the socio-ethical equation, we should morally evaluate their behavior. How should artificial moral agents make decisions? Is one moral theory better suited than others for machine ethics? After briefly overviewing the dominant ethical approaches for building morality into machines, this paper discusses a recent proposal, put forward by Don Howard and Ioan Muntean (2016, 2017), for an artificial moral agent based on (...)
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