8 found
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  1.  14
    Involuntary top-down control by search-irrelevant features: Visual working memory biases attention in an object-based manner.Rebecca M. Foerster & Werner X. Schneider - 2018 - Cognition 172 (C):37-45.
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  2.  16
    Action Selection and Execution in Everyday Activities: A Cognitive Robotics and Situation Model Perspective.David Vernon, Josefine Albert, Michael Beetz, Shiau-Chuen Chiou, Helge Ritter & Werner X. Schneider - 2022 - Topics in Cognitive Science 14 (2):344-362.
    Topics in Cognitive Science, Volume 14, Issue 2, Page 344-362, April 2022.
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  3.  36
    Effects of monitoring for visual events on distinct components of attention.Christian H. Poth, Anders Petersen, Claus Bundesen & Werner X. Schneider - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5:98474.
    Monitoring the environment for visual events while performing a concurrent task requires adjustment of visual processing priorities. By use of Bundesen's (1990) Theory of Visual Attention (TVA), we investigated how monitoring for an object-based brief event affected distinct components of visual attention in a concurrent task. The perceptual salience of the event was varied. Monitoring reduced the processing speed in the concurrent task, and the reduction was stronger when the event was less salient. The monitoring task neither affected the temporal (...)
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  4.  31
    Long-term memory-based control of attention in multi-step tasks requires working memory: evidence from domain-specific interference.Rebecca M. Foerster, Elena Carbone & Werner X. Schneider - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  5.  42
    Disentangling functional from structural descriptions, and the coordinating role of attention.Knut Drewing & Werner X. Schneider - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):205-206.
    The target article fails to disentangle the functional description from the structural description of the two somatosensory streams. Additional evidence and thorough reconsideration of the evidence cited argue for a functional distinction between the how processing and the what processing of somatosensory information, while questioning the validity and usefulness of the equation of these two types of processing with structural streams. We propose going one step further: to investigate how the distinct functional streams are coordinated via attention.
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  6.  22
    Structural descriptions in HIT – a problematic commitment.Markus Graf & Werner X. Schneider - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):483-484.
    Humphreys and Forde conceptualize object representations as structural descriptions, without discussing the implications of structural description models. We argue that structural description models entail two major assumptions – a part-structure assumption and an invariance assumption. The invariance assumption is highly problematic because it contradicts a large body of findings which indicate that recognition performance depends on orientation and size. We will delineate relevant findings and outline an alternative conception.
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  7.  4
    Episodic Short-Term Recognition Requires Encoding into Visual Working Memory: Evidence from Probe Recognition after Letter Report.Christian H. Poth & Werner X. Schneider - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  8.  22
    Characterizing chunks in visual short-term memory: Not more than one feature per dimension?Werner X. Schneider, Heiner Deubel & Maria-Barbara Wesenick - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):144-145.
    Cowan defines a chunk as “a collection of concepts that have strong associations to one another and much weaker associations to other chunks currently in use.” This definition does not impose any constraints on the nature and number of elements that can be bound into a chunk. We present an experiment to demonstrate that such limitations exist for visual short-term memory, and that their analysis may lead to important insights into properties of visual memory.
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