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Wendy Salkin
Stanford University
  1.  71
    The Conscription of Informal Political Representatives.Wendy Salkin - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (4):429-455.
    Informal political representation—the phenomenon of speaking or acting on behalf of others although one has not been elected or selected to do so by means of a systematized election or selection procedure—plays a crucial role in advancing the interests of groups. Sometimes, those who emerge as informal political representatives (IPRs) do so willingly (voluntary representatives). But, often, people end up being IPRs, either in their private lives or in more public political forums, over their own protests (unwilling representatives) or even (...)
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  2.  16
    The Conscription of Informal Political Representatives.Wendy Salkin - 2021 - Journal of Political Philosophy 29 (4):429-455.
    Journal of Political Philosophy, Volume 29, Issue 4, Page 429-455, December 2021.
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  3.  68
    Democracy Within, Justice Without: The Duties of Informal Political Representatives 1.Wendy Salkin - 2021 - Noûs.
    Informal political representation can be a political lifeline, particularly for oppressed and marginalized groups. Such representation can give these groups some say, however mediate, partial, and imperfect, in how things go for them. Coeval with the political goods such representation offers these groups are its particular dangers to them. Mindful of these dangers, skeptics challenge the practice for being, inter alia, unaccountable, unauthorized, inegalitarian, and oppressive. These challenges provide strong pro tanto reasons to think the practice morally impermissible. This paper (...)
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  4.  69
    Informal Political Representation: Normative and Conceptual Foundations.Wendy Salkin - 2018 - Dissertation, Harvard University
    It is possible that, as you read this, there is someone out there standing in for you, speaking in your voice, acting in your stead, making agreements on your behalf, or conceding a point you might not have wanted them to. They are not your congressperson, your lawyer, or your spouse—nor anyone else authorized by means of a formal, corporately organized election or selection procedure. There is another sort of representative out there, someone you did not elect, someone you perhaps (...)
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