Results for 'Well-being'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Personalist dimensions 109 section two. Health & Human Well-Being - 2002 - In Paulina Taboada, Kateryna Fedoryka Cuddeback & Patricia Donohue-White (eds.), Person, Society, and Value: Towards a Personalist Concept of Health. Kluwer Academic.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  53
    Well-being, autonomy, and the horizon problem.O. F. Well-Being - 2008 - Utilitas 20 (2).
  3. The Value of Living Longer.O. F. Well-Being - 2004 - In Sudhir Anand, Fabienne Peter & Amartya Sen (eds.), Public Health, Ethics, and Equity. Oxford University Press. pp. 243.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Yossi Yonah.Categorical Deprivation Well-Being - 1994 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 28:191.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Australasian Journal of Philosophy Contents of Volume 91.Present Desire Satisfaction, Past Well-Being, Volatile Reasons, Epistemic Focal Bias, Some Evidence is False, Counting Stages, Vague Entailment, What Russell Couldn'T. Describe, Liberal Thinking & Intentional Action First - 2013 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (4).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6.  10
    The discovery of the future: a discourse delivered to the Royal Institution on January 24, 1902.H. G. Wells - 1902 - London: T. Fisher Unwin. Edited by Joseph Pennell.
    This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7.  7
    Losing Our Virtue: Why the Church Must Recover Its Moral Vision.David F. Wells - 1999 - Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing.
    In Losing Our Virtue: Why the Church Must Recover Its Moral Vision, theologian David Wells argues that the Church is in danger of losing its moral authority to speak to a culture whose moral fabric is torn. Although much of the Church has enjoyed success and growth over the past years, Wells laments a "hollowing out of evangelical conviction, a loss of the biblical word in its authoritative function, and an erosion of character to the point that today, no discernible (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  11
    Military operations and the mind: war ethics and soldiers' well-being.Daniel Lagacé-Roy & Stéphanie A. H. Bélanger (eds.) - 2016 - Chicago: McGill-Queen's University Press.
    Offering a Canadian perspective on the emotional health of servicemen and women, Military Operations and the Mind brings together researchers and practitioners from across the country to consider the impact that ethical issues have on the well-being of those who serve. Stemming from an initiative to enhance the lives of serving members by providing them with the best education and training in military ethics before and after deployments, this volume will better inform politics and public policies and enhance (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  81
    Liberty for Corvids.Mark Wells, Scott Simmons & Diana Klimas - 2017 - Public Affairs Quarterly 31 (3):231-254.
    We argue that at least some corvids morally ought to be granted a right to bodily liberty in the US legal system and relevantly similar systems. This right would grant immunity to frivolous captivity and extermination. Implementing this right will require new legislation or the expansion of existing legislation including the elimination of various "pest" clauses. This paper proceeds in three parts. First, we survey accounts of the moral grounds of legal rights. Second, to establish an overlapping consensus supporting corvid (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  10
    The rule of reverse results: the effects of unethical policies?Audrey Wells - 2016 - Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
    Do extreme, unethical governmental policies often produce results opposite to those intended? This book considers the ironic outcomes of recent global events and concludes that there is a 'rule of reverse results' at work. While not a hard and fast law, the rule points out the increased probability that a policy will backfire if it is immoral while ethical policies, even if extreme, are unlikely to produce reverse results. The issue here is that of increased likelihood but not of certainty. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  2
    The biological foundations of belief.Wesley Raymond Wells - 1921 - Boston: R. J. Badger.
    The Biological Foundations of Belief is a groundbreaking study of the relationship between biology and religion. Wesley Raymond Wells argues that human belief systems are deeply rooted in our biological makeup, and that understanding this connection can shed new light on the origins and evolution of religion. This book is a fascinating exploration of the intersection between science and spirituality. This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  6
    Multidisciplinary perspectives on representational pluralism in human cognition: tracing points of convergence in psychology, science education, and philosophy of science.Michel Bélanger (ed.) - 2023 - London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group.
    Bringing together diverse theoretical and empirical contributions from the fields of social and cognitive psychology, philosophy, and science education, this volume explores representational pluralism as a phenomenon characteristic of human cognition. Building on these disciplines' shared interest in understanding human thought, perception, and conceptual change, the volume illustrates how representational plurality can be conducive to research and practice in varied fields. Particular care is taken to emphasize points of convergence and the value of sharing discourses, models, justifications, and theories of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  3
    Burdens of Proposing.David Godden & Simon Wells - 2022 - Informal Logic 44 (1):291-342.
    This paper considers the probative burdens of proposing action or policy options in deliberation dialogues. Do proposers bear a burden of proof? Building on pioneering work by Douglas Walton (2010), and following on a growing literature within computer science, the prevailing answer seems to be “No.” Instead, only recommenders—agents who put forward an option as the one to be taken—bear a burden of proof. Against this view, we contend that proposers have burdens of proof with respect to their proposals. Specifically, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. New Dimensions of the Square of Opposition.Jean-Yves Béziau & Stamatios Gerogiorgakis (eds.) - 2017 - Munich: Philosophia.
    The square of opposition is a diagram related to a theory of oppositions that goes back to Aristotle. Both the diagram and the theory have been discussed throughout the history of logic. Initially, the diagram was employed to present the Aristotelian theory of quantification, but extensions and criticisms of this theory have resulted in various other diagrams. The strength of the theory is that it is at the same time fairly simple and quite rich. The theory of oppositions has recently (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15. Why must punishment be.Unusual as Well As Cruel & Tobe Unconstitutional - 2002 - Public Affairs Quarterly 16:77.
  16. Du Châtelet, Induction, and Newton’s Rules for Reasoning.Aaron Wells - 2024 - European Journal of Philosophy 32.
    I examine Du Châtelet’s methodology for physics and metaphysics through the lens of her engagement with Newton’s Rules for Reasoning in Natural Philosophy. I first show that her early manuscript writings discuss and endorse these Rules. Then, I argue that her famous published account of hypotheses continues to invoke close analogues of Rules 3 and 4, despite various developments in her position. Once relevant experimental evidence and some basic constraints are met, it is legitimate to inductively generalize from observations; general (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  66
    To Tell the Truth, the Whole Truth, May Do Patients Harm: The Problem of the Nocebo Effect for Informed Consent.Rebecca Erwin Wells & Ted J. Kaptchuk - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):22-29.
    The principle of informed consent obligates physicians to explain possible side effects when prescribing medications. This disclosure may itself induce adverse effects through expectancy mechanisms known as nocebo effects, contradicting the principle of nonmaleficence. Rigorous research suggests that providing patients with a detailed enumeration of every possible adverse event—especially subjective self-appraised symptoms—can actually increase side effects. Describing one version of what might happen (clinical “facts”) may actually create outcomes that are different from what would have happened without this information (another (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  18. Adam Smith’s Bourgeois Virtues in Competition.Thomas Wells & Johan Graafland - 2012 - Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (2):319-350.
    Whether or not capitalism is compatible with ethics is a long standing dispute. We take up an approach to virtue ethics inspired by Adam Smith and consider how market competition influences the virtues most associated with modern commercial society. Up to a point, competition nurtures and supports such virtues as prudence, temperance, civility, industriousness and honesty. But there are also various mechanisms by which competition can have deleterious effects on the institutions and incentives necessary for sustaining even these most commercially (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  19.  2
    God the invisible king.H. G. Wells - 1917 - [n. p.]: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform.
    This book covers the author's conception of God aside from any religion. He does not come from a religious view in order to transmit the truest conception of God that he is capable of because any religion, whatever it might be, always claims God for itself in an exclusionary fashion. In other words, you must be a follower of the chosen faith before God will accept you into his kingdom. Wells rejects this view. Any man or woman who accepts God's (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  59
    Objective Being: Descartes and His Sources.Norman J. Wells - 1967 - Modern Schoolman 45 (1):49-61.
  21. Objective reality of ideas in Descartes, caterus, and suárez.Norman J. Wells - 1990 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (1):33-61.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Objective Reality of Ideas in Descartes, Caterus, and Su irez NORMAN j. WELLS IT HAS LONG BEEN ACKNOWLEDGEDthat Francisco Sufirez's distinction between a formal and an objective concept exercised some influence upon Descartes's teaching on 'idea'.' It would appear, however, that not enough attention has been given to that distinction of Sufirez (and especially to another to be mentioned shordy) to aid in dispelling what I take to be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  22.  78
    Higgs naturalness and the scalar boson proliferation instability problem.James D. Wells - 2017 - Synthese 194 (2):477-490.
    Sensitivity to the square of the cutoff scale of quantum corrections of the Higgs boson mass self-energy has led many authors to conclude that the Higgs theory suffers from a naturalness or fine-tuning problem. However, speculative new physics ideas to solve this problem have not manifested themselves yet at high-energy colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. For this reason, the role of naturalness as a guide to theory model-building is being severely questioned. Most attacks suggest that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  23.  11
    Catullus 44: The Invulnerability of Not Caring to Be Included.Wells S. Hansen - 2011 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 104 (4):419-426.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Kant, Linnaeus, and the economy of nature.Aaron Wells - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 83:101294.
    Ecology arguably has roots in eighteenth-century natural histories, such as Linnaeus's economy of nature, which pressed a case for holistic and final-causal explanations of organisms in terms of what we'd now call their environment. After sketching Kant's arguments for the indispensability of final-causal explanation merely in the case of individual organisms, and considering the Linnaean alternative, this paper examines Kant's critical response to Linnaean ideas. I argue that Kant does not explicitly reject Linnaeus's holism. But he maintains that the indispensability (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  80
    How confident can we be in reconstructions of the past?George A. Wells - 2013 - Think 12 (33):17-23.
    When I purchased Verdict on Jesus: A New Statement of Evidence, published by SPCK in 2010, I hoped it would confront me with the very latest attempt to vindicate Christian doctrines. In fact the book turns out to be fundamentally a reissue of a very conservative apologetic work of that title, first published sixty years earlier by an Anglican – Leslie Badham, who later became Vicar of Windsor and chaplain to the Queen. Admittedly, he updated the book in 1971, and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  18
    Review of Nancy Howell’s Life Histories of the Dobe!Kung: Food, Fatness, and Well-Being over the Life-Span. [REVIEW]Jonathan C. K. Wells - 2011 - Human Nature 22 (3):370-375.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  39
    Naturalness, Extra-Empirical Theory Assessments, and the Implications of Skepticism.James D. Wells - 2019 - Foundations of Physics 49 (9):991-1010.
    Naturalness is an extra-empirical quality that aims to assess plausibility of a theory. Finetuning measures are often deputized to quantify the task. However, knowing statistical distributions on parameters appears necessary. Such meta-theories are not known yet. A critical discussion of these issues is presented, including their possible resolutions in fixed points. Both agreement to and skepticism of naturalness’s utility remains credible, as is skepticism to any extra-empirical theory assessment that claims to identify “more correct” theories that are equally empirically adequate. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  9
    The discovery of the future.H. G. Wells - 1913 - New York: B.W. Huebsch.
    Excerpt: IT will lead into my subject most conveniently to contrast and separate two divergent types of mind, types which are to be distinguished chiefly by their attitude toward time, and more particularly by the relative importance they attach and the relative amount of thought they give to the future. The first of these two types of mind, and it is, I think, the predominant type, the type of the majority of living people, is that which seems scarcely to think (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29.  12
    Can Rationing Be Fair?Robert J. Wells - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (5):4.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  3
    The riddle of being.Gabriel Wells - 1934 - New York,: Priv. print..
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31.  2
    The riddle of being.Gabriel Wells - 1934 - New York,: Priv. print..
  32. Reasoning about Development: Essays on Amartya Sen's Capability Approach.Thomas R. Wells - 2013 - Dissertation, Erasmus University Rotterdam
    Over the last 30 years the Indian philosopher-economist Amartya Sen has developed an original normative approach to the evaluation of individual and social well-being. The foundational concern of this ‘capability approach’ is the real freedom of individuals to achieve the kind of lives they have reason to value. This freedom is analysed in terms of an individual’s ‘capability’ to achieve combinations of such intrinsically valuable ‘beings and doings’ (‘functionings’) as being sufficiently nourished and freely expressing one’s political (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  51
    Suarez, Historian and Critic of the Modal Distinction Between Essential Being and Existential Being.Norman J. Wells - 1962 - New Scholasticism 36 (4):419-444.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  45
    How destructive of traditional Christian beliefs is historical criticism of the bible today conceded to be?George A. Wells - 2011 - Think 10 (29):91-109.
    Many theologians accept that it is not plausible to dismiss what is called the ‘higher criticism’ altogether, but try to limit its efficacy. This article discusses a number of their ways of doing so.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  41
    Learning and Teaching Critical Thinking: From a Peircean Perspective.Kelley Wells - 2009 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 41 (2):201-218.
    The article will argue that Charles Sanders Peirce's concepts of the ‘Dynamics of Belief and Doubt’, the ‘Fixation of Belief’ as well as ‘habits of belief’ taken together comprise a theory of learning. The ‘dynamics of belief and doubt’ are Peirce's explanation for the process of changing from one belief to another. Teaching, then, would be an attempt to control that process. Teaching critical thinking represents an attempt to teach the learner to regulate and discipline his or her own (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  36.  39
    The extended phenotype: a comparison with niche construction theory.David A. Wells - 2015 - Biology and Philosophy 30 (4):547-567.
    While niche construction theory locates animal artefacts in their constructors’ environment, hence treating them as capable of exerting selective pressure on both the constructors and their descendants, the extended phenotype concept assimilates artefacts with their constructors’ genes. Analogous contrasts apply in the case of endoparasite and brood parasite genes influencing host behaviour. The explanatory power of these competing approaches are assessed by re-examining the core chapters of Richard Dawkins’ _The Extended Phenotype_. Because animal artefacts have multiple evolutionary consequences for their (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  37.  42
    The historical context of natural selection: The case of Patrick Matthew.Kentwood D. Wells - 1973 - Journal of the History of Biology 6 (2):225-258.
    It should be evident from the foregoing discussion that one man's natural selection is not necessarily the same as another man's. Why should this be so? How can two theories, which both Matthew and Darwin believed to be nearly identical, be so dissimilar? Apparently, neither Matthew nor Darwin understood the other's theory. Each man's viewpoint was colored by his own intellectual background and philosophical assumptions, and each read these into the other's ideas. The words sounded the same, so they assumed (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  38. Transformation without Paternalism.Thomas R. Wells & John B. Davis - 2016 - Journal of Human Development and Capabilities 17 (3):360-376.
    Human development is meant to be transformational in that it aims to improve people's lives by enhancing their capabilities. But who does it target: people as they are or the people they will become? This paper argues that the human development approach relies on an understanding of personal identity as dynamic rather than as static collections of preferences, and that this distinguishes human development from conventional approaches to development. Nevertheless, this dynamic understanding of personal identity is presently poorly conceptualized and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39.  28
    Frege's Ontology.Rulon S. Wells - 1951 - Review of Metaphysics 4 (4):537 - 573.
    It is Frege's third contribution that makes the point of departure for the present paper. Not merely did Frege show how to manipulate symbols more exactly; he also gave a searching account of what these symbols mean. Consider a philosophical problem that arises out of the simplest arithmetic. When we say that 5 = 2 + 3, what do we mean? Do we mean that 5 is identical with 2 + 3? But in some ways 5 and 2 + 3 (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  40.  16
    Just End Poverty Now: The Case for a Global Minimum Income.Thomas R. Wells - 2019 - Basic Income Studies 14 (2).
    Global GDP is more than 100 trillion dollars, yet 10 % of the world’s population still live in extreme poverty on less than $1.90 per day. No one should have to live like that: alleviating poverty is a minimal moral obligation implied by nearly every secular and religious moral system. Unfortunately, neither economic growth nor conventional international aid can be relied upon to fulfil this obligation. A global basic income programme that transferred $1 per day from the rich world to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41.  29
    Supporting Argumentation Schemes in Argumentative Dialogue Games.Simon Wells - 2014 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 36 (1):171-191.
    This paper reports preliminary work into the exploitation of argumentation schemes within dialogue games. We identify a property of dialogue games that we call “scheme awareness” that captures the relationship between dialogue game systems and argumentation schemes. Scheme awareness is used to examine the ways in which existing dialogue games utilise argumentation schemes and consequently the degree with which a dialogue game can be used to construct argument structures. The aim is to develop a set of guidelines for dialogue game (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  42.  28
    Typability and type checking in System F are equivalent and undecidable.J. B. Wells - 1999 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 98 (1-3):111-156.
    Girard and Reynolds independently invented System F to handle problems in logic and computer programming language design, respectively. Viewing F in the Curry style, which associates types with untyped lambda terms, raises the questions of typability and type checking. Typability asks for a term whether there exists some type it can be given. Type checking asks, for a particular term and type, whether the term can be given that type. The decidability of these problems has been settled for restrictions and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  43.  20
    Ontological and Other Assumptions.Lloyd A. Wells & Sandra J. Rackley - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (3):203-204.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Ontological and Other AssumptionsLloyd A. Wells (bio) and Sandra J. Rackley (bio)Fahrenberg and Cheetham have conducted an immensely thought-provoking study of the assumptions about human nature made by 800 students and pose a question about the future impact of these assumptions on individuals’ practice in professions including medicine and psychotherapy.This work represents a branch of “philosophical anthropology,” which considers assumptions people make about human nature. The authors used a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  27
    Pharmaceutical Ethics.F. Wells - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (6):e2-e2.
    Make no mistake, this interesting book emphatically reflects the backgrounds of its editors, as is to be expected, which are in pharmacy and in academic ethics. There is nothing wrong with that so long as we know. The stated target audience for the book are, however, those working in the clinical research of pharmaceutical products. Also it claims to cover a neglected area of medical ethics. What a pity therefore that the book pays no regard whatsoever to the report of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  28
    Peirce's "architecture of theories" and the problem of pragmatism.Kelley J. Wells - 1996 - Metaphilosophy 27 (3):311-323.
    The paper begins as a response to Tom Rockmore's thesis that contemporary pragmatism is a healthy “confusion” of disparate views. While Rockmore sees the need of some of today's pragmatists to provide a motivation for what he calls “epistemic optimism,” I contend that the crucial question of pragmatism, the problem of pragmatism, is the ontological status of pragmatic meaning. Thus rather than a mere “epistemic optimism,” I call upon pragmatists to assert a fallible yet unabashedly metaphysical optimism. The argument supporting (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Du Châtelet’s Philosophy of Mathematics.Aaron Wells - forthcoming - In Fatema Amijee (ed.), The Bloomsbury Handbook of Du Châtelet. Bloomsbury.
    I begin by outlining Du Châtelet’s ontology of mathematical objects: she is an idealist, and mathematical objects are fictions dependent on acts of abstraction. Next, I consider how this idealism can be reconciled with her endorsement of necessary truths in mathematics, which are grounded in essences that we do not create. Finally, I discuss how mathematics and physics relate within Du Châtelet’s idealism. Because the primary objects of physics are partly grounded in the same kinds of acts as yield mathematical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47.  17
    Qualitative Analysis of Emotional Distress in Cardiac Patients From the Perspectives of Cognitive Behavioral and Metacognitive Theories: Why Might Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Have Limited Benefit, and Might Metacognitive Therapy Be More Effective?Rebecca McPhillips, Peter Salmon, Adrian Wells & Peter Fisher - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48. Du Châtelet’s Libertarianism.Aaron Wells - 2022 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 38 (3):219-241.
    There is a growing consensus that Emilie Du Châtelet’s challenging essay “On Freedom” defends compatibilism. I offer an alternative, libertarian reading of the essay. I lay out the prima facie textual evidence for such a reading. I also explain how apparently compatibilist remarks in “On Freedom” can be read as aspects of a sophisticated type of libertarianism that rejects blind or arbitrary choice. To this end, I consider the historical context of Du Châtelet’s essay, and especially the dialectic between various (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  12
    Thou Shalt Not Squander Life – Comparing Five Approaches to Argument Strength.Simon Wells, Marcin Selinger, David Godden, Kamila Dębowska-Kozłowska & Frank Zenker - 2023 - Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 68 (1):133-167.
    Different approaches analyze the strength of a natural language argument in different ways. This paper contrasts the dialectical, structural, probabilistic (or Bayesian), computational, and empirical approaches by exemplarily applying them to a single argumentative text (Epicureans on Squandering Life; Aikin & Talisse, 2019). Rather than pitching these approaches against one another, our main goal is to show the room for fruitful interaction. Our focus is on a dialectical analysis of the squandering argument as an argumentative response that voids an interlocutor’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  54
    High liberalism and weak economic freedoms.Katy Wells - 2018 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 21 (6):679-702.
    In Free Market Fairness, John Tomasi argues that a wider range of private economic freedoms should be included amongst the high liberal set of basic rights than is normally thought. The topic of this paper is not primarily Tomasi’s own views, but a view that has emerged in the critical literature responding to Tomasi, consideration of which has so far been neglected. This view holds that whilst the specific private economic freedoms Tomasi proposes should be rejected, certain ‘weak’ private economic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 1000