Results for 'We Demand'

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  1.  5
    We Demand: The University and Student Protests: by Roderick A. Ferguson, Oakland, University of California Press, 2017, x + 122 pp., $18.95/£14.99.Francis D. Raška - 2020 - The European Legacy 26 (7-8):868-871.
    The issue of universities in the United States and their purpose has long been the subject of vigorous debate. Indeed, institutions of higher learning in the twenty-first century have undergone a m...
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  2.  2
    We Demand: The University and Student Protests.Roderick A. Ferguson - 2017 - University of California Press.
    This title is part of American Studies Now and available as an e-book first. Visit ucpress.edu/go/americanstudiesnow to learn more. In the post–World War II period, students rebelled against the university establishment. In student-led movements, women, minorities, immigrants, and indigenous people demanded that universities adapt to better serve the increasingly heterogeneous public and student bodies. The success of these movements had a profound impact on the intellectual landscape of the twentieth century: out of these efforts were born ethnic studies, women’s studies, (...)
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  3. 28. National Organization for Women (NOW) Bill of Rights.V. Child Care Centers, V. I. Equal, Unsegregated Education & We Demand - 1993 - In James P. Sterba (ed.), Morality in practice. Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth.
     
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  4.  4
    What Can We Demand of a Referee Report?Sven Ove Hansson - 2020 - Theoria 86 (3):289-292.
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  5.  4
    We become what we normalize: what we owe each other in worlds that demand our silence.David Dark - 2023 - Minneapolis: Broadleaf Books.
    From respected thinker and public intellectual David Dark comes We Become What We Normalize, both a cultural critique and a robust summons to resist complicity when it comes to conversations on politics, religion, and media. Dark offers a spirited call to witness to ethics, community, and change for ourselves and the worlds we inhabit.
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  6.  1
    "We're Not Moving Forward": Carers' Demand for Novel Research and Effective Interventions for Psychotic Disorders.Paolo Corsico - 2021 - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 11 (3):275-295.
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  7.  4
    Task Demands, Task Interest, and Task Performance: Implications for Human Subjects Research and Practicing What We Preach.Arun Pillutla & Daniel M. Eveleth - 2003 - Ethics and Behavior 13 (2):153-172.
    Through the continuous investigation of humans in organizations, we have learned much about motivation, attitudes, and performance. For example, Yukl and others have helped increase our understanding of influence tactics and the effect they have on the performance of subordinates, supervisors, and peers. Some tactics (and combinations of tactics) lead to resistance, some lead to compliance, and some lead to commitment. In this study, we raise the question of whether or not we incorporate our knowledge of these research findings into (...)
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  8.  1
    “We’re Not Moving Forward”: Carers’ Demand for Novel Research and Effective Interventions for Psychotic Disorders.Paolo Corsico - forthcoming - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics.
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  9.  2
    Do we really externalize or objectivize moral demands?Stephen Stich - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41:e113.
    Stanford's goal is to explain the uniquely human tendency to externalize or objectify “distinctively moral” demands, norms, and obligations. I maintain that there is no clear phenomenon to explain. Stanford's account of which norms are distinctively moral relies on Turiel's problematic work. Stanford's justification of the claim that we “objectify” moral demands ignores recent studies indicating that often we do not.
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  10.  5
    “We do this because the market demands it”: alternative meat production and the speciesist logic.Markus Lundström - 2019 - Agriculture and Human Values 36 (1):127-136.
    The past decades’ substantial growth in globalized meat consumption continues to shape the international political economy of food and agriculture. This political economy of meat composes a site of contention; in Brazil, where livestock production is particularly thriving, large agri-food corporations are being challenged by alternative food networks. This article analyzes experiential and experimental accounts of such an actor—a collectivized pork cooperative tied to Brazil’s Landless Movement—which seeks to navigate the political economy of meat. The ethnographic case study documents these (...)
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  11. Pain Demands to Be Felt: Why We Choose to Engage with Tragic Works of Fiction.Cheryl Frazier - 2016 - Florida Philosophical Review 16 (1):56-67.
    Some of the most successful works of art throughout history have dealt with tragic themes. From Romeo and Juliet to Jack and Rose in the film Titanic, millions of people have sat captivated through stories of death, separation, and loss. John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars has captivated audiences for half a decade, despite it depicting two young teens whose lives are threatened by cancer. Why is it that we actively seek out movies, books, paintings, and music that bring (...)
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  12.  13
    What We May Demand of Each Other.Simon Căbulea May - 2013 - Analysis 73 (3):554-563.
    In this critical notice of Gerald Gaus's The Order of Public Reason, I reject two arguments Gaus advances for the claim that social moral rules must be publicly justified.
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  13.  15
    What Fairness Demands: How We Can Promote Fair Compensation in Human Infection Challenge Studies and Beyond.Seán O’Neill McPartlin & Josh Morrison - 2021 - American Journal of Bioethics 21 (3):48-50.
    This commentary shall focus on the central claim made in Lynch et al.’s paper “Promoting Ethical Payment in Human Infection Challenge Studies.” According to their paper, there is a threefold...
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  14.  2
    Consumer demand: Can we deal with differing priorities?P. Monaghan - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):29-30.
  15. Moral Demands and Ethical Theory: The Case of Consequentialism.Attila Tanyi - 2013 - In Barry Dainton & Howard Robinson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Analytic Philosophy. London: Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 500-527.
    Morality is demanding; this is a platitude. It is thus no surprise when we find that moral theories too, when we look into what they require, turn out to be demanding. However, there is at least one moral theory – consequentialism – that is said to be beset by this demandingness problem. This calls for an explanation: Why only consequentialism? This then leads to related questions: What is the demandingness problematic about? What exactly does it claim? Finally, there is the (...)
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  16. What do we epistemically owe to each other? A reply to Basu.Robert Carry Osborne - 2020 - Philosophical Studies 178 (3):1005-1022.
    What, if anything, do we epistemically owe to each other? Various “traditional” views of epistemology might hold either that we don’t epistemically owe anything to each other, because “what we owe to each other” is the realm of the moral, or that what we epistemically owe to each other is just to be epistemically responsible agents. Basu (2019) has recently argued, against such views, that morality makes extra-epistemic demands upon what we should believe about one another. So, what we owe (...)
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  17.  93
    Thought dynamics under task demands.Nick Brosowsky, Samuel Murray, Jonathan Schooler & Paul Seli - forthcoming - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance.
    As research on mind wandering has accelerated, the construct’s defining features have expanded and researchers have begun to examine different dimensions of mind wandering. Recently, Christoff and colleagues have argued for the importance of investigating a hitherto neglected variety of mind wandering: “unconstrained thought,” or, thought that is relatively unguided by executive-control processes. To date, with only a handful of studies investigating unconstrained thought, little is known about this intriguing type of mind wandering. Across two experiments, we examined, for the (...)
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  18.  6
    Morally-Demanding Infinite Responsibility: The Supererogatory Attitude of Levinasian Normativity.Julio Andrade - 2021 - Springer Verlag.
    This book presents a conceptual mapping of supererogation in the analytic moral philosophical tradition. It first asks whether supererogation can be conceptualised in the absence of obligation or duty and then makes the case that it can be. It does so by enlisting the resources of the continental tradition, specifically using the work of Emmanuel Levinas and his notion of infinite responsibility. In so doing the book contributes to the ongoing efforts to create a common ethical terminology between the analytic (...)
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  19.  1
    Schooling for All in India: Can We Neglect the Demand?Santhakumar Velappan Nair, Namita Gupta & Rama Murthy Sripada - 2016 - Oxford University Press India.
    The volume critically analyses the primary drawbacks of the Indian education system-non-enrolment, dropouts, irregular attendance, and inadequate learning. It establishes the need to strongly encourage parents to recognize the importance of education for their children's future. Arguing that supply-side strategies-free education, midday meals, opening more schools-have not proved effective since the problem of inadequate demand is much larger, the authors delineate the measures that are required to boost the demand for education in India.
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  20.  32
    The demands of beneficence.Liam Murphy - 1993 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (4):267-292.
    Principles of bcnciiccnce require us to promote the good. If we believe that a plausible mom] conception will contain some such principle, we must address the issue of the demands it imposes on agents. Some writers have defended extremely demanding principles, while others have argued that only principles with limited demands are acceptable. In this paper I su ggest that we 100k at the demands 0f beneficencc in a different way; 0ur concern should not just be with the extent of (...)
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  21.  5
    The Demands of Performance Generating Systems on Executive Functions: Effects and Mediating Processes.Pil Hansen, Emma A. Climie & Robert J. Oxoby - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11:536752.
    Performance Generating Systems (PGS) are rule- and task-based approaches to improvisation on stage in theatre, dance, and music. These systems require performers to draw on predefined source materials (texts, scores, memories) while working on complex tasks within limiting rules. An interdisciplinary research team at a large Western Canadian university hypothesized that learning to sustain this praxis over the duration of a performance places high demands on executive functions; demands that may improve the performers’ executive abilities. These performers need to continuously (...)
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  22.  6
    Job Demands and Resources, Mindfulness, and Burnout Among Delivery Drivers in China.Congcong Zhang, Shannon P. Cheung & Chienchung Huang - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    The food and package delivery workforce in China has grown substantially in the past decade. However, delivery drivers face volatile and stressful work conditions, which can give rise to high turnover and burnout. Past research has indicated that job demands and resources significantly predict burnout. Scholars have also found evidence that mindfulness may be a protective factor against negative outcomes like burnout. Using data collected from 240 food and package delivery drivers in Beijing, China, we examined the effects of JD-R (...)
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  23.  8
    Artificiality, Reactivity, and Demand Effects in Experimental Economics.Maria Jimenez-Buedo & Francesco Guala - 2016 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 46 (1):3-23.
    A series of recent debates in experimental economics have associated demand effects with the artificiality of the experimental setting and have linked it to the problem of external validity. In this paper, we argue that these associations can be misleading, partly because of the ambiguity with which “artificiality” has been defined, but also because demand effects and external validity are related in complex ways. We argue that artificiality may be directly as well as inversely correlated with demand (...)
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  24.  20
    The Cognitive Demands of Friendship.Anna Brinkerhoff - 2022 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 104 (1):101-123.
    What does friendship require of us cognitively? Recently, some philosophers have argued that friendship places demands on what we believe. Specifically, they argue, friendship demands that we have positive beliefs about our friends even when such beliefs go against the evidence. Call this the doxastic account of the cognitive demands of friendship. Defenders of the doxastic account are committed to making a surprising claim about epistemology: sometimes, our beliefs should be sensitive to things that don’t bear on their truth. I (...)
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  25.  9
    Local Demand, Quality of Place, and Urban Tourism Competitiveness.Jin Weng, Jiaying Xiao & Larry Yu - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Most studies on tourism destination competitiveness examined the direct relationships of destination attributes and destination competitiveness. Few studies explored the intervening mechanisms between destination attributes and competitiveness. This study selected cities above the “alpha” level in the Globalization and World Cities Research Network rankings as samples to examine the relationship between local demand and urban tourism competitiveness mediated by the quality of place. Results showed that the relationship between urban wealth and tourist arrivals was completely mediated by the quality (...)
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  26.  95
    Demands of Justice, Feasible Alternatives, and the Need for Causal Analysis.David Wiens - 2013 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (2):325-338.
    Many political philosophers hold the Feasible Alternatives Principle (FAP): justice demands that we implement some reform of international institutions P only if P is feasible and P improves upon the status quo from the standpoint of justice. The FAP implies that any argument for a moral requirement to implement P must incorporate claims whose content pertains to the causal processes that explain the current state of affairs. Yet, philosophers routinely neglect the need to attend to actual causal processes. This undermines (...)
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  27.  3
    Discriminatory Demands by Patients.Philip M. Rosoff - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (4):7-11.
    Most of us working in health care are concerned—perhaps even appalled—when patients make demands for doctors or nurses or other caregivers that accord with their bigoted sentiments. Even though there may be some reasons to believe that matching certain characteristics of doctors with those of their patients (whether the latter ask for them or not) may produce both more patient satisfaction and even some health benefits, how does one tease apart or distinguish requests that are potentially beneficial from those we (...)
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  28.  19
    Does morality demand our very best? On moral prescriptions and the line of duty.Michael Ferry - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (2):573-589.
    It is widely accepted that morality does not demand that we do our very best, but our most significant moral traditions do not easily accommodate this intuition. I will argue that the underlying problem is not specific to any particular tradition. Rather, it will be difficult for any moral theory to account for binary moral concepts like permissible/impermissible while also accounting for scalar moral concepts like better/worse. If only the best is considered permissible, morality will seem either unreasonably demanding (...)
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  29.  13
    “Whose demand?” The co-construction of markets, demand and gender in development-oriented crop breeding.Ida Arff Tarjem, Ola Tveitereid Westengen, Poul Wisborg & Katharina Glaab - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-18.
    Advancing women’s empowerment and gender equality in agriculture is a recognised development goal, also within crop breeding. Increasingly, breeding teams are expected to use ‘market-based’ approaches to design more ‘demand-led’ and ‘gender-responsive’ crop varieties. Based on an institutional ethnography that includes high-profile development-oriented breeding initiatives, we unpack these terms using perspectives from political agronomy and feminist science and technology studies. By conceptualising the market as an ongoing, relational performance made up of discourses, practices and human and nonhuman actors, we (...)
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  30.  7
    Daily Challenge/Hindrance Demands and Cognitive Wellbeing: A Multilevel Moderated Mediation Model.Huangen Chen, Hongyan Wang, Mengsha Yuan & Shan Xu - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Based on the challenge-hindrance stressor model, this study explored the mechanism of how challenge/hindrance demands affect cognitive wellbeing on a daily basis. Specifically, we examined the mediating effect of work–family enrichment on the relationship between challenge/hindrance demands and cognitive wellbeing. In addition, we tested the moderating effect of overqualification on the relationship between challenge/hindrance demands and work–family enrichment on a daily basis. Finally, we examined the moderated mediation effect of perceived overqualification in a multilevel model. To capture changes in work–family (...)
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  31. The Normative Demand for Deference in Political Solidarity.Kerri Woods & Joshua Hobbs - 2024 - Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric 14 (1):53-78.
    Allies of those experiencing injustice or oppression face a dilemma: to be neutral in the face of calls to solidarity risks siding with oppressors, yet to speak or act on behalf of others risks compounding the injustice. We identify what we call ‘a normative demand for deference’ (NDD) to those with lived experience as a response to this dilemma. Yet, while the NDD is prevalent, albeit sometimes implicitly so, in contemporary solidarity theory and activist practice, it remains under-theorised. In (...)
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  32. Does rationality demand higher-order certainty?Mattias Skipper - 2020 - Synthese 198 (12):11561-11585.
    Should you always be certain about what you should believe? In other words, does rationality demand higher-order certainty? First answer: Yes! Higher-order uncertainty can’t be rational, since it breeds at least a mild form of epistemic akrasia. Second answer: No! Higher-order certainty can’t be rational, since it licenses a dogmatic kind of insensitivity to higher-order evidence. Which answer wins out? The first, I argue. Once we get clearer about what higher-order certainty is, a view emerges on which higher-order certainty (...)
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  33.  14
    Moral affordances and the demands of fittingness.Fabienne Peter - forthcoming - Philosophical Psychology.
    Some situations appear to make moral demands on us – they call for a certain response. How can we account for such paradigmatic moral experiences? And what normative properties or relations are involved? This paper argues that we can account for such moral experiences in terms of moral affordances, where moral affordances are opportunities for fitting action. The paper demonstrates that the concept of affordances helps to generate new insight in moral inquiry, especially in relation to the moral significance of (...)
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  34. Differential Demands.Vanessa Carbonell - 2015 - In Marcel van Ackeren & Michael Kühler (eds.), The Limits of Moral Obligation: Moral Demandingness and Ought Implies Can. New York: Routledge. pp. 36-50.
    If the traditional problem of demandingness is that a theory demands too much of all agents, for example by asking them to maximize utility in every decision, then we should ask whether there is a related problem of “differential demandingness”, when a theory places vastly different demands on different agents. I argue that even according to common-sense morality, the demands faced by particular agents depend on a variety of contingent factors. These include the general circumstances, the compliance of others, the (...)
     
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  35.  4
    Law of demand and stochastic choice.S. Cerreia-Vioglio, F. Maccheroni, M. Marinacci & A. Rustichini - 2021 - Theory and Decision 92 (3-4):513-529.
    We consider random choice rules that, by satisfying a weak form of Luce’s choice axiom, embody a form probabilistic rationality. We show that for this important class of stochastic choices, the law of demand for normal goods—arguably the main result of traditional consumer theory—continues to hold on average when strictly dominated alternatives are dismissed.
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  36.  9
    Processing demands associated with relational complexity: Testing predictions with dual-task methodologies.Daniel B. Berch & Elizabeth J. Foley - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):832-833.
    We discuss how modified dual-task approaches may be used to verify the degree to which cognitive tasks are capacity demanding. We also delineate some of the complexities associated with the use of the “double easy-to-hard” paradigm for testing claim of Halford, Wilson & Phillips that hierarchical reasoning imposes processing demands equivalent to those of transitive reasoning.
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  37. The Demands of Beauty: Kant on the Normative Force of Aesthetic Reasons.Jessica J. Williams - 2024 - Estetika: The European Journal of Aesthetics 61 (1):1-19.
    According to a number of contemporary theorists, aesthetic reasons can invite or entice us but never compel us. In this paper, I develop a Kantian account of the normative force of aesthetic reasons. While Kant would likely agree that aesthetic reasons do not give rise to obligations, his account nevertheless gives us the resources for explaining how aesthetic reasons can still have more force than merely enticing reasons. This account appeals to the distinct normativity of aesthetic judgments on Kant's theory (...)
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  38. Junk, Numerosity, and the Demands of Epistemic Consequentialism.Michal Masny - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-20.
    Epistemic consequentialism has been challenged on the grounds that it is overly demanding. According to the Epistemic Junk Problem, this view implies that we are often required to believe junk propositions such as ‘the Great Bear Lake is the largest lake entirely in Canada’ and long disjunctions of things we already believe. According to the Numerosity Problem, this view implies that we are frequently required to have an enormous number of beliefs. This paper puts forward a novel version of epistemic (...)
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  39.  18
    Demanding Recognition.Cillian McBride - 2009 - European Journal of Political Theory 8 (1):96-108.
    This article argues that we must distinguish between two distinct currents in the politics of recognition, one centred on demands for equal respect which is consistent with liberal egalitarianism, and one which centres on demands for esteem made on behalf of particular groups which is at odds with egalitarian aims. A variety of claims associated with the politics of recognition are assessed and it is argued that these are readily accommodated within contemporary liberal egalitarian theory. It is argued that, pace (...)
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  40.  2
    Demand Sharing Inaccuracies in Supply Chains: A Simulation Study.Salvatore Cannella, Roberto Dominguez, Jose M. Framinan & Manfredi Bruccoleri - 2018 - Complexity 2018:1-13.
    We investigate two main sources of information inaccuracies in demand information sharing along the supply chain. Firstly, we perform a systematic literature review on inaccuracy in demand information sharing and its impact on supply chain dynamics. Secondly, we model several SC settings using system dynamics and assess the impact of such information inaccuracies on SC performance. More specifically, we study the impact of four factors using three SC dynamic performance indicators. The results suggest that demand error has (...)
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  41.  71
    Global Health and the Demands of the Day.Meg Stalcup & Stéphane Verguet - 2011 - Health, Culture and Society 1 (1):28-44.
    We have two goals in this paper: first, to provide a diagnosis of global health and underline some of its blockages; second, to offer an alternative interpretation of what the demands for those in global health may be. The assumption that health is a good that requires no further explanation, and that per se it can serve as an actual modus operandi, lays the foundations of the problem. Related blockages ensue and are described using HIV prevention with a focus on (...)
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  42.  8
    The Job Demands and Resources Related to COVID-19 in Predicting Emotional Exhaustion and Secondary Traumatic Stress Among Health Professionals in Spain.Jennifer E. Moreno-Jiménez, Luis Manuel Blanco-Donoso, Mario Chico-Fernández, Sylvia Belda Hofheinz, Bernardo Moreno-Jiménez & Eva Garrosa - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The current COVID-19 crisis may have an impact on the mental health of professionals working on the frontline, especially healthcare workers due to the increase of occupational psychosocial risks, such as emotional exhaustion and secondary traumatic stress. This study explored job demands and resources during the COVID-19 crisis in predicting emotional exhaustion and STS among health professionals. The present study is a descriptive and correlational cross-sectional design, conducted in different hospitals and health centers in Spain. The sample consisted of 221 (...)
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  43. Consequentialism and Its Demands: A Representative Study.Attila Tanyi & Martin Bruder - 2014 - Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (2):293-314.
    An influential objection to act-consequentialism holds that the theory is unduly demanding. This paper is an attempt to approach this critique of act-consequentialism – the Overdemandingness Objection – from a different, so far undiscussed, angle. First, the paper argues that the most convincing form of the Objection claims that consequentialism is overdemanding because it requires us, with decisive force, to do things that, intuitively, we do not have decisive reason to perform. Second, in order to investigate the existence of the (...)
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  44.  9
    If we were kin: race, identification, and intimate political appeals.Lisa Beard - 2023 - New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    If We Were Kin is about the we of politics-how that we is made, fought over, and remade-and how these struggles lie at the very core of questions about power and political change. While reigning frameworks in the study of politics leave forms of identification sedimented in the background as a priori identities or prop them up front as a part of a mechanistic and calculated game, political identification cannot be captured by these frameworks and is a far more significant (...)
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  45.  27
    Back by popular demand, ontology: Productive tensions between anthropological and philosophical approaches to ontology.Julia J. Turska & David Ludwig - 2023 - Synthese 202 (2):39.
    In this paper we analyze relations between ontology in anthropology and philosophy beyond simple homonymy or synonymy and show how this diagnosis allows for new interdisciplinary links and insights, while minimizing the risk of cross-disciplinary equivocation. We introduce the ontological turn in anthropology as an intellectual project rooted in the critique of dualism of culture and nature and propose a classification of the literature we reviewed into first-order claims about the world and second-order claims about ontological frameworks. Next, rather than (...)
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  46.  12
    Hold-up induced by demand for fairness: theory and experimental evidence.Raghabendra Pratap Kc, Dominique Olié Lauga & Vincent Mak - 2023 - Theory and Decision 94 (4):721-750.
    Research in recent years suggests that fairness concerns could mitigate hold-up problems. In this study, we report theoretical analysis and experimental evidence on an opposite possibility: that fairness concerns could also induce hold-up problems. In our setup, hold-up problems will not occur with purely self-interested agents, but theoretically could be induced by demand for distributional fairness among agents without sufficiently strong counteracting factors such as intention-based reciprocity. We observe a widespread occurrence of hold-up in our experiment. Relationship-specific investments occurred (...)
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  47.  12
    Responsibility and the Demands of Morality.Stephen J. White - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (3):315-338.
    Is it a good objection to a moral theory that it demands a great deal of individual agents? I argue that if we interpret the question to be about the potential welfare costs associated with our moral obligations, the answer must be “no.” However, the demands a moral theory makes can also be measured in terms of what it requires us to take responsibility for. I argue that this is distinct from what we may be required to do or give (...)
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  48.  85
    Consequentialist Demands, Intuitions and Experimental Methodology (with Joe Sweetman).Attila Tanyi - manuscript
    Can morality be so demanding that we have reason not to follow its dictates? According to many, it can, if that morality is a consequentialist one. We take the plausibility and coherence of this objection – the Demandingness Objection – as a given and are also not concerned with finding the best response to the Objection. Instead, our main aim is to explicate the intuitive background of the Objection and to see how this background could be investigated. This double aim (...)
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  49.  4
    Should We Formulate an Incentivized Model Facilitating Kidney Donation from Living Donors? A Focus on Turkey's Current System.Ercan Avci - 2018 - Developing World Bioethics 18 (3):279-290.
    Kidney transplantation is a lifesaving medical treatment. However, very high demand for kidneys with low kidney donation causes a black market that exploits patients’ desperation and donors’ vulnerability. The current kidney donation programs fail to produce promising results to avoid illegal and unethical kidney trafficking and commercialism. Even though the primary goal of kidney donation is to increase the number of deceased organ donations, in some countries, like Turkey, due to religious or cultural concerns, it is impossible to supply (...)
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    Back by popular demand, ontology: Productive tensions between anthropological and philosophical approaches to ontology.Julia J. Turska & David Ludwig - 2023 - Synthese 202 (2):1-22.
    In this paper we analyze relations between _ontology_ in anthropology and philosophy beyond simple homonymy or synonymy and show how this diagnosis allows for new interdisciplinary links and insights, while minimizing the risk of cross-disciplinary equivocation. We introduce the ontological turn in anthropology as an intellectual project rooted in the critique of dualism of culture and nature and propose a classification of the literature we reviewed into first-order claims about the world and second-order claims about ontological frameworks. Next, rather than (...)
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