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  1.  22
    The Development of the Quaestorship, 267–81 b.c.W. V. Harris - 1976 - Classical Quarterly 26 (01):92-.
    In 267 the number of quaestors was increased from the established total of four . But how many were added, and what were their functions? The standard works agree that the new quaestors numbered four, and that they were stationed in four Italian towns, where they are usually supposed tohave performed administrative functions necessary to the Roman navy, and, in the case of the quaestor stationed at Ostia, functions necessary to Rome's grainsupply. These were the quaestores classici, or according to (...)
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  2.  6
    Rome in Etruria and Umbria.E. T. Salmon & W. V. Harris - 1974 - American Journal of Philology 95 (2):191.
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  3.  32
    Lysias III and Athenian beliefs about revenge.W. V. Harris - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (02):363-.
    It has recently been argued by Gabriel Herman that fourth-century Athenian citizens, or at least the majority of them, believed that even under the impact of serious private aggression a man should not pursue revenge. The general ideal, so it is maintained, was to avoid not only violent revenge but also revenge through prosecution. Herman recognizes that other Athenian texts of the same period take the propriety of exacting revenge for granted, and he explains this in part by reference to (...)
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  4.  4
    Hannibal's March in History.W. V. Harris & Dennis Proctor - 1974 - American Journal of Philology 95 (4):421.
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  5.  23
    Lysias III and Athenian beliefs about revenge.W. V. Harris - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (2):363-366.
    It has recently been argued by Gabriel Herman that fourth-century Athenian citizens, or at least the majority of them, believed that even under the impact of serious private aggression a man should not pursue revenge. The general ideal, so it is maintained, was to avoid not only violent revenge but also revenge through prosecution. Herman recognizes that other Athenian texts of the same period take the propriety of exacting revenge for granted, and he explains this in part by reference to (...)
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  6. Morris Keith Hopkins, 1934-2004.W. V. Harris - 2005 - In Harris W. V. (ed.), Proceedings of the British Academy Volume 130, Biographical Memoirs of Fellows, IV. pp. 81-105.
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  7.  11
    Marginal Land and Population Pressure in the Ancient Mediterranean, 800 BC to 600 AD.W. V. Harris - 2018 - História 67 (4):390-417.
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  8.  14
    Saving the ϕαινόμενα: a note on Aristotle's definition of anger.W. V. Harris - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (2):452-454.
    In hisRhetoricAristotle gives six definitions of emotions in approximately the following form, with the word(Rhetoric ii.2.137830–1). Does he mean ‘Let anger be a reaching-out, accompanied by pain, forconspicuousrevenge for someconspicuousslight to oneself or one's own, the slight not having been deserved’, or should ϕαινομένηςίην be taken to mean ‘manifest, plain’, or (a third possibility) should it be translated ‘perceived, apparent’? Since this is his fullest definition of anger, the question deserves discussion, even though a number of scholars, including such an (...)
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  9.  47
    Saving the ϕαινόμενα: a note on Aristotle's definition of anger.W. V. Harris - 1997 - Classical Quarterly 47 (02):452-.
    In his Rhetoric Aristotle gives six definitions of emotions in approximately the following form, with the word . Does he mean ‘Let anger be a reaching-out, accompanied by pain, for conspicuous revenge for some conspicuous slight to oneself or one's own, the slight not having been deserved’, or should αινομένηςίην be taken to mean ‘manifest, plain’, or should it be translated ‘perceived, apparent’? Since this is his fullest definition of anger, the question deserves discussion, even though a number of scholars, (...)
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  10.  16
    The Development of the Quaestorship, 267–81 b.c.W. V. Harris - 1976 - Classical Quarterly 26 (1):92-106.
    In 267 the number of quaestors was increased from the established total of four. But how many were added, and what were their functions? The standard works agree that the new quaestors numbered four, and that they were stationed in four Italian towns, where they are usually supposed tohave performed administrative functions necessary to the Roman navy, and, in the case of the quaestor stationed at Ostia, functions necessary to Rome's grainsupply. These were the quaestores classici, or according to others (...)
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  11.  10
    The German Landscape and Julio-Claudian Imperialism.W. V. Harris - 2021 - Klio 103 (2):658-674.
    Summary New scientific work on the ancient landscapes of Germany and Britain makes it very likely that the Roman decision to abandon attempts to conquer Germany as far as the Elbe, most clearly expressed by Tiberius in 16 AD, was strongly influenced by perceptions of the heavily wooded landscape of that region. There were other reasons too: the concern of emperors to hinder potential rivals; the sheer difficulty of advancing to the Elbe; and the increasing concern of the emperor and (...)
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  12.  6
    The Reputation of the Manteis in the Century after the Sicilian Expedition.W. V. Harris - 2020 - Hermes 148 (1):4.
    In Greek myth and history manteis (‘seers’, ‘diviners’) had a respected position, which did not, however, save them from being mocked by the fifth-century comic poets. They possessed a distinct technê, which was considered especially important in warfare but useful for other purposes too. This article considers their social profile, and the varied reactions to them of diverse elements in the population. The manteis encouraged the Sicilian Expedition and suffered some reputational consequences from its failure. But in the fourth century (...)
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  13.  23
    Perchance to Dream - (E.) Scioli, (C.) Walde (edd.) Sub imagine somni: Nighttime Phenomena in Greco-Roman Culture. (Testi e Studi di Cultura Classica 46.) Pp. xviii + 313, ills. Pisa: Edizioni ETS, 2010. Paper, €14. ISBN: 978-88-467-2637-7. [REVIEW]W. V. Harris - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (1):262-264.
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