21 found
Order:
  1.  68
    Basic Emotions or Ur-Emotions?Nico H. Frijda & W. Gerrod Parrott - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):406-415.
    This article sets out to replace the concept of basic emotions with the notion of “ur-emotions,” the functionally central underlying processes of action readiness, which are not emotions at all. We propose that what is basic and universal in emotions are not multicomponential syndromes, but states of action readiness, themselves variants of motive states to relate or not relate with the world and with oneself. Unlike emotions, ur-emotions can be held to be universal and biologically based.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  2.  18
    Emotion terms, category structure, and the problem of translation: The case of shame_ and _vergüenza.Alejandra Hurtado de Mendoza, José Miguel Fernández-Dols, W. Gerrod Parrott & Pilar Carrera - 2010 - Cognition and Emotion 24 (4):661-680.
    We conducted three studies aimed at showing that one-to-one translations between emotion terms might be comparing independent or barely overlapping categories of emotional experience. In Study 1 we found that the speakers' most accessible features of two supposedly equivalent emotions terms (shame and vergüenza) were very different. In Study 2, American and Spanish speakers' typicality ratings of 25 out of 29 constitutive features of “shame” or “vergüenza” were significantly different. In Study 3, these important differences in the content and internal (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  3.  18
    When feeling bad makes you look good: Guilt, shame, and person perception.Deborah C. Stearns & W. Gerrod Parrott - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (3):407-430.
  4.  12
    Embarrassment: Actual vs. typical cases, classical vs. prototypical representations.W. Gerrod Parrott & Stefanie F. Smith - 1991 - Cognition and Emotion 5 (5-6):467-488.
  5.  16
    Neuropsychology and the cognitive nature of the emotions.W. Gerrod Parrott & Jay Schulkin - 1993 - Cognition and Emotion 7 (1):43-59.
  6.  68
    Embarrassment: A dramaturgic account.Maury Silver, John Sabini, W. Gerrod Parrott & Maury Silver - 1987 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 17 (1):47–61.
  7.  21
    Cognition and Emotionover twenty-five years.Keith Oatley, W. Gerrod Parrott, Craig Smith & Fraser Watts - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (8):1341-1348.
  8.  50
    Ur-Emotions and Your Emotions: Reconceptualizing Basic Emotion.W. Gerrod Parrott - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (1):14-21.
    The term ur-emotion is proposed to replace basic emotion as a name for the aspects of emotion that underlie perceived similarities of emotion types across cultures and species. The ur- prefix is borrowed from the German on analogy to similar borrowings in textual criticism and musicology. The proposed term ur-emotion is less likely to be interpreted as referring to the entirety of an emotional state than is the term basic emotion. Ur-emotion avoids reductionism by indicating an abstract underlying structure that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9.  13
    The Effectiveness of Somatization in Communicating Distress in Korean and American Cultural Contexts.Eunsoo Choi, Yulia Chentsova-Dutton & W. Gerrod Parrott - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10.  40
    Ur-Emotions: The Common Feature of Animal Emotions and Socially Constructed Emotions.W. Gerrod Parrott - 2012 - Emotion Review 4 (3):247-248.
    Comparison of human and animal emotions reveals a fuzzy yet discernible boundary. Their undeniable similarities are more aptly described as ur-emotions than as basic emotions. This article describes how the concept of ur-emotion can be useful to animal researchers as well as to social constructionists by making sense of emotional variation both across species and across cultures.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11.  30
    Infants' Expectations in Play: The Joy of Peek-a-boo.W. Gerrod Parrott & Henry Gleitman - 1989 - Cognition and Emotion 3 (4):291-311.
  12.  30
    Function of Emotion: Introduction.W. Gerrod Parrott - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (5):465-466.
  13.  22
    Editorial.Yulia Chentsova & W. Gerrod Parrott - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (2):101-101.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  8
    New Section: Perspectives on Mental Health.Yulia Chentsova Dutton, W. Gerrod Parrott & Jonathan Rottenberg - 2020 - Emotion Review 12 (1):22-22.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  2
    Editorial.W. Gerrod Parrott - 2021 - Emotion Review 13 (2):77-77.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  90
    Emotions in Social Psychology: Key Readings.W. Gerrod Parrott (ed.) - 2000 - Psychology Press.
    This reader presents a collection of influential articles on the nature of emotions and ther role in social psychological phenomena, along with recent work that reflects the current state of the art.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  17.  21
    Mood induction and instructions to sustain moods: A test of the subject compliance hypothesis of mood congruent memory.W. Gerrod Parrott - 1991 - Cognition and Emotion 5 (1):41-52.
  18.  9
    Recent Texts on the Psychology of Emotion: A Multiple Book Review.W. Gerrod Parrott - 1999 - Cognition and Emotion 13 (6):837-842.
  19.  18
    What sort of system could an affective system be? A reply to LeDoux.W. Gerrod Parrott & Jay Schulkin - 1993 - Cognition and Emotion 7 (1):65-69.
  20.  16
    Emotionology in prose: A study of descriptions of emotions from three literary periods.Matthew P. Spackman & W. Gerrod Parrott - 2001 - Cognition and Emotion 15 (5):553-573.
    Descriptions of emotion incidents were extracted from classic American novels of the Romantic, Victorian, and Modern Periods. These descriptions were then rated by respondents on scales relevant to attribution of responsibility for emotions. It was found that ratings of the emotion descriptions differed across the three literary periods, with descriptions from the Romantic Period being rated most intense and most appropriate, descriptions from the Victorian Period as least intense, and descriptions from the Modern Period as least appropriate. In addition, it (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21.  9
    A Cross-Cultural Comparison of American and Japanese Experiences of Personal and Vicarious Shame.Niwako Yamawaki, W. Gerrod Parrott & Matthew P. Spackman - 2015 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 15 (1-2):64-86.
    The purpose of this study was to examine cultural influences on shame. In particular, the focus was to assess the influence of the following factors on the object of shame : the effect of individualism/collectivism, measured by a widely used standardized measurement; the role of tightness/looseness ; and the patterns of within- and between-cultural differences and similarities. Data were collected from two American and two Japanese universities to test within- and between-cultural influences on the object of shame. Participants were asked (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation