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W. Ezekiel Goggin
University of Chicago (PhD)
  1.  39
    Hegel and Bataille on Sacrifice.W. Ezekiel Goggin - 2018 - Hegel Bulletin 39 (2):236-259.
    In Georges Bataille’s view, the Hegelian interpretation of kenotic sacrifice as passage from Spirit to the Speculative Idea effaces the necessarily representational character of sacrifice and the irreducible non-presence of death. But Hegel identifies these aspects of death in the fragments of the 1800 System. In sacrificial acts, subjectivity represents its disappearance via the sacrificed other, and hence is negated and conserved. Sacrifice thus provides the representational model of sublation pursued in the Phenomenology as a propaedeutic to Science. Bataille’s critique (...)
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  2.  32
    Robyn Marasco on Dialectical Despair and the Sources of Critical Theory. [REVIEW]W. Ezekiel Goggin - 2016 - Radical Philosophy Review 19 (2):513-516.
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  3. Selfhood and Sacrifice in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit.W. Ezekiel Goggin - 2017 - In Self or No-Self? The Debate about Selflessness and the Sense of Self. Claremont Studies in the Philosophy of Religion, Conference 2015.
    Religious, philosophical, and theological views on the self vary widely. For some the self is seen as the center of human personhood, the ultimate bearer of personal identity and the core mystery of human existence. For others the self is a grammatical error and the sense of self an existential and epistemic delusion. This volume documents a debate between Eastern and Western critics and defenders of the self or of the no-self that explores the intercultural dimensions of this important topic.
     
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  4. Transcendental Frustration: A Critical Re-Evaluation of the Hegelian Legacy for Philosophy of Religion.W. Ezekiel Goggin - 2019 - Journal for Cultural and Religious Theory 3 (18):383-399.
    For philosophers who would think “with” religion, rather than simply to theorize “about” it, the question of the relationship between religious imagination and philosophical rationality is a matter of constitutive importance. The way we answer this question would have far reaching implications for how we understand the work we do as philosophers who take religion seriously, and how we situate ourselves within broader academic contexts. Indeed, the answer to such a question –insofar as we can give any sort of definitive (...)
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