26 found
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  1.  18
    New Light on Lavoisier: The research of the last ten years.W. A. Smeaton - 1963 - History of Science 2 (1):51-69.
    SINCE the publication in 1952 of Douglas McKie's Antoine Lavoisier, the standard biography which is of great value to all students of eighteenth-century science, there has been a steady increase in knowledge of most aspects of Lavoisier's life and work. This survey will be concerned ,mainly with monographs and papers in scientific and historical journals, but several important books may first be noted.
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  2.  12
    Macquer's Dictionnaire de Chymie: A bibliographical study.Roy G. Neville & W. A. Smeaton - 1981 - Annals of Science 38 (6):613-662.
    The eighteenth century saw the publication of many scientific and technical dictionaries, particularly in France, one of the most important being P. J. Macquer's Dictionnaire de chymie. Both the original text of 1766 and the revised and enlarged version of 1778 were translated into several languages, sometimes with authoritative notes and additions by the translators. No mere list of definitions, Macquer's work contained long articles that made it a comprehensive treatise on chemistry, and it set the pattern for many subsequent (...)
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  3.  12
    L'avant-coureur. The journal in which some of Lavoisier's earliest research was reported.W. A. Smeaton - 1957 - Annals of Science 13 (4):219-234.
  4.  21
    The contributions of P.-J. Macquer, T. O. Bergman and L. B. Guyton de Morveau to the reform of chemical nomenclature.W. A. Smeaton - 1954 - Annals of Science 10 (2):87-106.
  5.  24
    The ice calorimeter of Lavoisier and Laplace and some of its critics.T. H. Lodwig & W. A. Smeaton - 1974 - Annals of Science 31 (1):1-18.
  6.  13
    Lavoisier's membership of the Société royale d'Agriculture and the Comité d'Agriculture.W. A. Smeaton - 1956 - Annals of Science 12 (4):267-277.
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  7.  14
    Schwediauer, Bentham and Beddoes: Translators of Bergman and Scheele.Bertel Linder & W. A. Smeaton - 1968 - Annals of Science 24 (4):259-273.
  8.  7
    Some large burning lenses and their use by eighteenth-century French and british chemists.W. A. Smeaton - 1987 - Annals of Science 44 (3):265-276.
    In scientific circles in Paris and London large burning lenses were used in the eighteenth century as a means of reaching very high temperatures. However, their great expense proved to be unjustified, for chemists found that even in good weather they did not give reproducible results. This paper is concerned only with chemical applications of the lenses, and not with theoretical discussions of the means of eliminating aberration or calculating the temperatures attained.
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  9.  14
    The early history of laboratory instruction in chemistry at the ecole polytechnique, Paris, and elsewhere.W. A. Smeaton - 1954 - Annals of Science 10 (3):224-233.
  10.  16
    Lavoisier's membership of the Société royale de médecine.W. A. Smeaton - 1956 - Annals of Science 12 (3):228-244.
  11.  34
    The early years of the Lycée and the Lycée des Arts. A chapter in the lives of A. L. Lavoisier and A. F. de Fourcroy.W. A. Smeaton - 1955 - Annals of Science 11 (3):257-267.
  12.  20
    The origins and authorship of the educational proposals published in 1793 by the Bureau de Consultation des Arts et Métiers and generally ascribed to Lavoisier.K. M. Baker & W. A. Smeaton - 1965 - Annals of Science 21 (1):33-46.
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  13.  9
    An account of Lavoisier's reconciliation with the church a short time before his death.Lucien Scheler & W. A. Smeaton - 1958 - Annals of Science 14 (2):148-153.
  14.  10
    Some unrecorded editions of Fourcroy's Philosophie chimique.W. A. Smeaton - 1967 - Annals of Science 23 (4):295-298.
  15.  19
    The chemical work of Horace Bénédict de Saussure (1740–1799), with the text of a letter written to him by madame Lavoisier.W. A. Smeaton - 1978 - Annals of Science 35 (1):1-16.
    In 1768 H. B. de Saussure studied chemistry with Baumé in Paris, and subsequently, using precise quantitative methods, he analysed minerals collected during his alpine journeys. He began to use the blowpipe in 1784, and later adapted it so that with a microscope and micrometer he could examine the effects of high temperatures on minute specimens of minerals. Analyses of air carried out with a portable eudiometer convinced him that air from alpine valleys contained more oxygen, and was therefore healthier, (...)
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  16.  21
    The early years of the Lycée and the Lycée des Arts. A chapter in the lives of A. L. Lavoisier and A. F. de Fourcroy.W. A. Smeaton - 1955 - Annals of Science 11 (4):309-319.
  17.  8
    Two unrecorded publications of the régie des poudres et salpˆetres probably written by Lavoisier.W. A. Smeaton - 1956 - Annals of Science 12 (2):157-159.
  18.  13
    A Scientific Autobiography of Joseph Priestley, 1733-1804. Selected Scientific Correspondence,Edited with a Commentary. Robert E. Schofield. [REVIEW]W. A. Smeaton - 1968 - Isis 59 (2):236-237.
  19.  12
    Book Review: A History of ChemistryA History of Chemistry. Volume iii. PartingtonJ. R. . Pp. xxiv + 854. £6 6s. od. [REVIEW]W. A. Smeaton - 1964 - History of Science 3 (1):148-149.
  20.  8
    Book Review: Historical Studies in the Language of ChemistryHistorical Studies in the Language of Chemistry. CroslandMaurice P. . Pp. xvii + 406. 50s. [REVIEW]W. A. Smeaton - 1964 - History of Science 3 (1):150-151.
  21.  11
    Chemistry and Biochemistry Claude-Louis Berthollet, Revue de l'Essai de Statique Chimique, édition critique par Michelle Sadoun-Goupil. Paris: École Polytechnique, 1980. Pp. vii + 204. ISBN 2-7302-0019-3. [REVIEW]W. A. Smeaton - 1984 - British Journal for the History of Science 17 (2):242-242.
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  22.  11
    Chemistry A Dissertation on Elective Attractions. By Torbern Bergman. Second edition. Introduction by A. M. Duncan. London: F. Cass. 1970. Pp. xl + xv + 383 + . 7 folding plates and tables. £7·35. [REVIEW]W. A. Smeaton - 1971 - British Journal for the History of Science 5 (4):406-406.
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  23.  28
    Chemistry The Periodic System of Chemical Elements: A History of the First Hundred Years. By J. W. van Spronsen. Amsterdam, London and New York: Elsevier. 1969. Pp. xv + 368, with portraits, tables and 139 figures, £6. [REVIEW]W. A. Smeaton - 1970 - British Journal for the History of Science 5 (2):194-195.
  24.  16
    History of Chemistry Alfred Werner. Founder of Co-ordination Chemistry. By George B. Kauffman. Berlin, Heidelberg and New York: Springer-Verlag. 1966. Pp. xv + 127. DM. 24. [REVIEW]W. A. Smeaton - 1968 - British Journal for the History of Science 4 (2):183-183.
  25.  18
    History of Chemistry Chemistry and Beyond. A selection from the writings of the late Professor F. A. Paneth. Edited by Herbert Dingle and G. R. Martin, with the assistance of Eva Paneth. Pp. xxi + 285. Frontispiece and 35 figures. New York, London, Sydney: Interscience , 1964. 45s. [REVIEW]W. A. Smeaton - 1966 - British Journal for the History of Science 3 (1):88-89.
  26.  19
    Scientific Societies Mémoires de Physique et de Chimie de la Société d' Arcueil. A Facsimile of the Paris, 1807–1817, Edition. With a new Introduction and an Analytical Table of Contents by Maurice P. Crosland. The Sources of Science, No. 36. New York and London: Johnson Reprint Corporation. 1967. Vol. I, Pp. xlvi + iv + 382; Vol. II, Pp. 498; Vol. III, Pp. 618. £23 16s. [REVIEW]W. A. Smeaton - 1969 - British Journal for the History of Science 4 (3):287-288.