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  1.  43
    An Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):346-346.
    This is a surprisingly good book. Published by Longmans in Great Britain as part of a series on "Education Today," it provides a very lucid and cogent first glimpse at the discipline of the philosophy of religion. The author's perspective is derivative of the analytic school, but what makes the book so valuable is that Goodall relates linguistic distinctions to Biblical categories. The author makes it obvious that he is a believer and authenticates the conviction that one can be a (...)
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  2.  39
    Situational Morality. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):346-346.
    This small pamphlet presents a critical analysis of the "situational ethic" as it has been proposed by a number of Protestant writers. Gleason is a Jesuit and clearly takes issue with such innovations in ethics. He favors instead the natural law tradition in which man is bound to conscience and must be obedient to the principles of that law: "In creating man God has given him a natural light of the intelligence by which he may know what is to be (...)
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  3.  36
    The Art of Philosophizing and Other Essays. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):355-355.
    This book is made up of three rather superficial essays by Russell, hardly more than tapes of lectures given years and years ago. It's a pity that Russell, or someone, sanctions such bowdlerizing of what was once philosophical profundity. Russell is at his acerbic worst in these essays, shallow and intolerant.--W. A. J.
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  4.  32
    A History of Theology. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):125-126.
    The author believes that it is impossible to resolve the crucial theological issues of our time without an appreciation of the historical roots of the development of theology itself. Congar does not attempt in this volume a systematic analysis of the content of theology, as it is expressed in history. He limits himself to the meaning of the discipline of theology as it expresses itself in six periods in the life of the church, The Patristic Age and St. Augustine, From (...)
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  5.  32
    Science and Christ. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):759-760.
    This is a collection of early essays. It ought to be read with The Future of Man before any of his other works, particularly before trying to stumble through such terms as the 'Noosphere,' 'forced coalescence,' 'Migh-Synthesis'. Teilhard does not argue in syllogistic form, which may be scandalous to Scholastics. But then he does not argue at all. He seems to assume that he is writing to a select group of cognoscenti, who know as much about science and philosophy as (...)
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  6.  31
    Problems and Perspectives in the Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):366-366.
    This is a rather helpful volume, containing a collection of introductory materials in the field of the philosophy of religion. The authors group the contents of the volume about six topics: reason, faith, and philosophy; arguments for the divine reality; religious experience and revelation; religion and ethics; the meaning of religious statements; and God, man, and the world. To provide a helpful alternative to this division, the authors locate four different philosophical traditions in the above material : rationalism-idealism; empiricism; Existentialism; (...)
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  7.  28
    World Perspectives in Philosophy, Religion, and Culture. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):367-368.
    An important book. This Festschrift presented to Professor Datta on the occasion of his 70 birthday, contains important contributions by a number of non-Eastern philosophers, including Edwin A. Burtt, "A Problem in Comparative Philosophy," William K. Frankena, "Ethics in an Age of Science," Cornelius Kruse, "Immanuel Kant," F. S. C. Northrop, "The Philosophical Roots and Validity of Tagore's Genius," and H. W. Schneider's, "Religious Diversity in America." Dr. D. M. Datta was both a scholarly and professional philosopher, as well as (...)
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  8.  26
    The Future of God. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):742-743.
    Braaten is correct when he argues that "the Christian Gospel can expect to get a hearing in modern culture only when it has some important news to bring about our human future, when it is really concerned about the world's tomorrows". The theology of hope is about the Christian's attempt to speak in terms congruent with the Left's demand for a new heaven and a new earth. It is the attempt on the part of the Christian community to relate New (...)
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  9.  21
    A Christian Critique of American Culture. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (3):556-557.
    This is a marvelous book. Although billed as a Dogmatics, it is really a rambling and magnanimous presentation of the Christian faith-theology as well as practice. It is guided by the attempt to be systematic and comprehensive. It is filled with wonderful human insights into the nature of the Christian posture in a wayward world. It is part philosophical theology, part a theology of culture, and part practical theology. But it is more than all of its parts. What we have (...)
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  10.  20
    What is Existentialism? [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (3):569-569.
    The Overview series functions as a kind of reputable pony for harried Roman Catholics. This particular volume gives a rather surprisingly competent description of what Existentialism is all about. The author finds Existentialism's greatest virtue in its emphasis upon human freedom. He rejects the Sartrean Existentialism in favor of its Marcelian form. This is a valuable little work, somewhat akin to Jean Wahl's book on the same subject of a few generations ago.--W. A. J.
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  11.  20
    Zwingli's Theocracy. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):359-360.
    This work, a reworked doctoral thesis written for Roland Bainton at the Yale Divinity School, begins with an announcement of a specific scholarly purpose: "To clarify the relationship between the clergy and the magistracy which grew out of Zwingli's reforming work at Zurich... the main focus of the study is upon the early stages of Zwingli's career at Zurich.... The ensuing study accepts the assumption that Zwingli believed in a Christian society ruled by two God-ordained officers, the magistrate and the (...)
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  12.  19
    Early Christian Experience. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):742-742.
    Günther Bornkamm, a chief disciple of Rudolph Bultmann, has gathered together a number of his expository articles in this volume. The chapters deal generally with themes familiar to Bultmann's aficionados, concentrating heavily on Paul's Epistle to the Romans and other letters of Paul. The chapters are headed "God's Word and Man's Word in the New Testament," "Christ and the World in the Early Christian Message," "Faith and Reason in Paul," "The Revelation of God's Wrath," "Baptism and New Life in Paul," (...)
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  13.  19
    Martyrdom and Persecution in the Early Church. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):129-130.
    Frend's thesis about the origins of Christendom is that "Christianity came up from below." Christianity had its greatest impact and appeal on the lower classes of the Greco-Roman world. The earliest Christians had little influence upon the classical literature of the first century. But there were institutional and ideological influences among the lowest social order that were substantial. Archaeological research and discovery have amplified the kind of everyday life that the Christians lived. Frend looks at Christianity primarily as a social (...)
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  14.  19
    The Ethical Mysticism of Albert Schweitzer. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):125-125.
    This is one of those obviously worked-over doctoral dissertations. There is one chapter which reviews all previous studies dealing with Schweitzer, with copious footnotes in many languages. In spite of Clark's underlying attitude of adulation of the Master, his analysis of Schweitzer's thought is rather helpful. He places Schweitzer in the main stream of nineteenth-century German romantic thought and examines the impact that that thought had upon the theologians of the period. But he believes that Schweitzer is foremost an ethical (...)
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  15.  18
    The Sources of Existentialism as Philosophy. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (3):573-573.
    This is an extremely helpful book, superbly edited by Professor Molina, whose earlier book Existentialism as Philosophy provided a helpful introduction to existentialism as a serious, systematic philosophy. Molina successfully avoids all temptations to exploit the faddish quality of existentialism. After all these years, even the most protected, sequestered, academic institutions have had their resident left-bank habitue. And so one could play about lightly with Nietzsche and Kierkegaard, sell lots of books, sound serious, and leave still another generation impressed with (...)
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  16.  17
    Critical Existentialism. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (4):737-737.
    Abbagnano clearly belongs to the first rank of European philosophers. He is an existentialist concerned primarily with the category of "the possible." He outlines his basic ideas in several essays, "What is Existentialism?" and "Existentialism is a Positive Philosophy," in which the distinctive character of "the possible" is related to other existentialistic notions. Other essays deal with "Faith, Philosophy, Religion," "Science and Freedom," "Experience and Metaphysics," "The Method of Philosophy." What makes the volume so very attractive to the American reader (...)
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  17.  15
    Autobiographies of Ten Religious Leaders--Alternatives in Christian Experience. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):357-357.
    The author is convinced that autobiography is revelatory of great cultural movements, and that the Christian faith is historically multi-dimensioned. Tsanoff has a marvelous facility to bring together diverse materials into a conceptual whole. He is capable of making St. Augustine representative of the patristic period and Newman of the Anglo-Catholic wing of the Church of England. In addition to these two Christian thinkers, Tsanoff portrays St. Teresa of Avila, George Fox, John Bunyan, John Wesley, Ernest Renan, count Tolstoy, Albert (...)
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  18.  14
    The Non-Existence of God. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (3):553-554.
    Burkle examines various philosophical suggestions that God is not an existing reality. Hegel, Sartre, and Henry Dumery are selected as representative of the position Burkle calls "antitheism." What is common to all of the antitheists is that objective existence is denied to God, or that the category of existence itself is an ambiguous one when ascribed to God. Burkle argues that one cannot divorce the concept of human existence from a concept of the "other," or God, or some notion of (...)
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  19.  14
    The Sense of Absence. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):133-134.
    The author of this little but suggestive volume believes that the "Death of God" theologians answer questions no one is asking. And for that reason he rejects in toto the kind of theology advocated by this strange breed of Christian "apologist". But MacGregor believes that theologizing about the "absence of God" is salutary for the intellectual concerns of the modern Christian. He finds references to the notion of the "hiddenness of God" in all of the reformers and especially in those (...)
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  20.  12
    Apology for Wonder. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):348-348.
    Keen is dependent upon Norman O. Brown's Dionysian vision of reality in his description of the phenomenon of wonder. In a sense Keen's book is nothing more than a theological restatement of Brown's Love's Body in didactic and conceptual fashion. But the author argues persuasively that our vision of reality is much too dependent upon the Greek rational model, so that we become chained to ideas and can never be ourselves. From a Christian perspective, Keen argues, this is wrong. Christ (...)
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  21.  12
    Beauty and Sensibility in the Thought of Jonathan Edwards: An Essay in Aesthetics and Theological Ethics. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):343-343.
    This is a massive doctor's dissertation completed for the Graduate School of Religion at Yale University. The author demonstrates rather conclusively that the concept of beauty provides Jonathan Edwards with a model for the manner by which God governs the world. What is more, the same concept is employed by Edwards to characterize the goal and means of redemption. For the Edwardsian cogniscenti!--W. A. J.
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  22.  12
    Evil and the Concept of God. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (3):556-556.
    Two philosophers look at religion without any preconceived notions about the nature of God and the problem of evil and suffering in the world. They demonstrate that their conclusions are the same as those of many others who have explored those problems: God cannot exist if there is evil in the world!--W. A. J.
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  23.  11
    The Philosophy of Mahatma Gandhi and Other Essays Philosophical and Sociological. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):359-359.
    This volume has a misleading title: one might think that the material in this long work is by the great Indian spiritual leader. But it is not. Rather it is a collection of essays by A. R. Wadia, M.P., and it is only the first essay in the tome which is about Gandhi. Wadia is obviously some kind of Renaissance man, an interpreter of all knowledge--philosophical and religious, western and eastern--to the Indian mind. In one volume can be found Wadia (...)
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  24.  8
    From Dialogue to Epilogue: Marxism and Catholicism To-Morrow. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (3):552-552.
    Although amply footnoted this book is informal to the point of being chatty and preachy. Overall its virtue is to announce that Roman Catholics and Marxists are not such strange bed-fellows after all, but that with intellectual openness they can truly talk to one another. The greatest defect of the book is its function as a primer for unenlightened Catholics on the massive changes taking place in Rome. The volume, then, denies Martin D'Arcy's contention "that the Ark of Peter is (...)
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  25. Machina Ex Deo: Essays in the Dynamism of Western Culture. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1970 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (3):569-570.
    This little volume, by the Director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at the University of California is a splendid work. Lynn White, who considers himself a Christian and a humanist, has written an important book linking together cultural changes in the modern world with those events in earlier periods which precipitated the changes. His major thesis is that the alienation of the humanist from technology is unfortunate, and that a rapprochement between the two is possible if one (...)
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  26.  7
    Spirit Versus Structure: Luther and the Institutions of the Church. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (1):136-137.
    Pelikan argues, in this little book dealing with Luther's understanding of the Church, that the Reformer developed a reliance on some sort of "structure for the Spirit." The early Luther must be distinguished from the later Luther in terms of the conception of the relationship between the Holy Spirit and the institutional structures of the Church. The radical Reformer in the 1520s came announcing "the counsel I have learned under the Spirit's guidance"; but by the 1530s he was searching for (...)
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  27.  14
    Kierkegaard and the Existential Philosophy. [REVIEW]A. J. W. - 1971 - Review of Metaphysics 24 (4):757-758.
    Shestov's name appears from time to time in existentialist literature. Camus, for example, refers approvingly to Shestov in The Myth of Sisyphus: "Shestov... tracks down, illuminates, and magnifies the human revolt against the irremediable." Kierkegaard and the Existential Philosophy was translated earlier into French and into Danish in 1947, and German in 1949. The Danes received Shestov's book with great appreciation, and were particularly happy about his attempt to relate Kierkegaard to such diverse thinkers as Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Hegel, Spinoza, (...)
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