18 found
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  1. From Perceptual Categories to Concepts: What Develops?Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (7):1244-1286.
    People are remarkably smart: They use language, possess complex motor skills, make nontrivial inferences, develop and use scientific theories, make laws, and adapt to complex dynamic environments. Much of this knowledge requires concepts and this study focuses on how people acquire concepts. It is argued that conceptual development progresses from simple perceptual grouping to highly abstract scientific concepts. This proposal of conceptual development has four parts. First, it is argued that categories in the world have different structure. Second, there might (...)
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  2.  42
    The Role of Words and Sounds in Infants' Visual Processing: From Overshadowing to Attentional Tuning.Vladimir M. Sloutsky & Christopher W. Robinson - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (2):342-365.
    Although it is well documented that language plays an important role in cognitive development, there are different views concerning the mechanisms underlying these effects. Some argue that even early in development, effects of words stem from top‐down knowledge, whereas others argue that these effects stem from auditory input affecting attention allocated to visual input. Previous research (e.g., Robinson & Sloutsky, 2004a) demonstrated that non‐speech sounds attenuate processing of corresponding visual input at 8, 12, and 16 months of age, whereas the (...)
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  3.  14
    Attentional mechanisms drive systematic exploration in young children.Nathaniel J. Blanco & Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2020 - Cognition 202 (C):104327.
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  4.  10
    Statistical regularities shape semantic organization throughout development.Layla Unger, Olivera Savic & Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2020 - Cognition 198:104190.
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  5.  12
    As within, so without, as above, so below: Common mechanisms can support between- and within-trial category learning dynamics.Emily R. Weichart, Matthew Galdo, Vladimir M. Sloutsky & Brandon M. Turner - 2022 - Psychological Review 129 (5):1104-1143.
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  6.  87
    The Role of Words in Cognitive Tasks: What, When, and How?Christopher W. Robinson, Catherine A. Best, Wei Deng & Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
  7.  48
    Redundancy matters: Flexible learning of multiple contingencies in infants.Vladimir M. Sloutsky & Christopher W. Robinson - 2013 - Cognition 126 (2):156-164.
  8.  39
    The cost of concreteness: The effect of nonessential information on analogical transfer.Jennifer A. Kaminski, Vladimir M. Sloutsky & Andrew F. Heckler - 2013 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 19 (1):14.
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  9.  16
    Cognitive flexibility and memory in pigeons, human children, and adults.Kevin P. Darby, Leyre Castro, Edward A. Wasserman & Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2018 - Cognition 177 (C):30-40.
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  10.  75
    Mechanisms of Cognitive Development: Domain-General Learning or Domain-Specific Constraints?Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2010 - Cognitive Science 34 (7):1125-1130.
  11.  5
    The Role of Attention in Category Representation.Mengcun Gao, Brandon M. Turner & Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2024 - Cognitive Science 48 (4):e13438.
    Numerous studies have found that selective attention affects category learning. However, previous research did not distinguish between the contribution of focusing and filtering components of selective attention. This study addresses this issue by examining how components of selective attention affect category representation. Participants first learned a rule‐plus‐similarity category structure, and then were presented with category priming followed by categorization and recognition tests. Additionally, to evaluate the involvement of focusing and filtering, we fit models with different attentional mechanisms to the data. (...)
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  12. The effect of labels on visual attention: an eye tracking study.Catherine A. Best, Christopher W. Robinson & Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 1846--1851.
  13.  11
    Selective and distributed attention in human and pigeon category learning.Leyre Castro, Olivera Savic, Victor Navarro, Vladimir M. Sloutsky & Edward A. Wasserman - 2020 - Cognition 204 (C):104350.
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  14.  36
    Evidence for auditory dominance in a passive oddball task.Christopher W. Robinson, Nayef Ahmar & Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2010 - In S. Ohlsson & R. Catrambone (eds.), Proceedings of the 32nd Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 2644--2649.
  15. Visual statistical learning: Getting some help from the auditory modality.Christopher W. Robinson & Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2007 - In McNamara D. S. & Trafton J. G. (eds.), Proceedings of the 29th Annual Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. pp. 611--616.
     
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  16.  7
    Analogy is to priming as relations are to transformations.Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):396-397.
    The commentary discusses three components of the target proposal: (1) analogy as a host of phenomena, (2) relations as transformations, and (3) analogy as priming. The commentary argues that the first component is potentially productive, but it has yet to be fully developed, whereas the second and third components do not have an obvious way of accounting for multiple counterexamples.
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  17.  7
    Recognition memory and mechanisms of induction: Comment on Wilburn and Feeney.Vladimir M. Sloutsky - 2008 - Cognition 108 (2):500-506.
  18.  1
    “The eyes are the window to the representation”: Linking gaze to memory precision and decision weights in object discrimination tasks.Emily R. Weichart, Layla Unger, Nicole King, Vladimir M. Sloutsky & Brandon M. Turner - forthcoming - Psychological Review.
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