6 found
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Virginia L. Warren [8]Virginia Louise Warren [1]
  1.  27
    Feminist Directions in Medical Ethics.Virginia L. Warren - 1989 - Hypatia 4 (2):73-86.
    I explore some new directions—suggested by feminism—for medical ethics and for philosophical ethics generally. Moral philosophers need to confront two issues. The first is deciding which moral issues merit attention. Questions which incorporate the perspectives of women need to be posed—e. g., about the unequal treatment of women in health care, about the roles of physician and nurse, and about relationship issues other than power struggles. “Crisis issues” currently dominate medical ethics, to the neglect of what I call “housekeeping issues.” (...)
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  2.  53
    Feminist directions in medical ethics.Virginia L. Warren - 1992 - HEC Forum 4 (1):73 - 87.
    I explore some new directions-suggested by feminism-for medical ethics and for philosophical ethics generally. Moral philosophers need to confront two issues. The first is deciding which moral issues merit attention. Questions which incorporate the perspectives of women need to be posed-e.g., about the unequal treatment of women in health care, about the roles of physician and nurse, and about relationship issues other than power struggles. "Crisis issues" currently dominate medical ethics, to the neglect of what I call "housekeeping issues." The (...)
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  3.  51
    The 'medicine is war' metaphor.Virginia L. Warren - 1991 - HEC Forum 3 (1):39-50.
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  4.  25
    A Kierkegaardian Approach to Moral Philosophy: The Process of Moral Decision-Making.Virginia L. Warren - 1982 - Journal of Religious Ethics 10 (2):221 - 237.
    A more complete methodology for normative ethics is needed, and Kierkegaard's philosophy, which emphasizes the individual's role in moral decision-making, can help to meet this need. This essay discusses two ways in which Kierkegaard sought to expand a commonly accepted conception of morality. First, he stressed that the agent changes as part of the process of moral decision-making, with personal experience and insight integral parts of that process. Second, Kierkegaard included within the realm of morality decisions (e.g., about occupation) which (...)
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  5.  51
    Explaining masochism.Virginia L. Warren - 1985 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 15 (2):103–129.
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  6. Solomon--the ultimate moral expert?Virginia L. Warren - 1989 - Hec Forum: An Interdisciplinary Journal on Hospitals' Ethical and Legal Issues 2 (6):375-379.
     
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