Results for 'Values'

992 found
Order:
See also
Bibliography: Rights and Values in Social and Political Philosophy
Bibliography: Literary Values in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Science and Values in General Philosophy of Science
Bibliography: Personal Identity and Values in Metaphysics
Bibliography: Values in Film in Aesthetics
Bibliography: Values and Norms in Normative Ethics
Bibliography: Values in Economics in Philosophy of Social Science
Bibliography: Semantic Values in Philosophy of Language
Bibliography: Personal Identity and Values, Misc in Metaphysics
Bibliography: Truth-Values in Philosophy of Language
...
Other categories were found but are not shown. Use more specific keywords to find others, or browse the categories.
  1.  37
    Environmental Values, Anthropocentrism and Speciesism.Onora O'Neill & Environmental Values - 1997 - Environmental Values 6 (2):127-142.
    Ethical reasoning of all types is anthropocentric, in that it is addressed to agents, but anthropocentric starting points vary in the preference they accord the human species. Realist claims about environmental values, utilitarian reasoning and rights-based reasoning all have difficulties in according ethical concern to certain all aspects of natural world. Obligation-based reasoning can provide quite strong if incomplete reasons to protect the natural world, including individual non-human animals. Although it cannot establish all the conclusions to which anti-speciesists aspire, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  2. Values in China as Compared to Africa: Two Conceptions of Harmony.Thaddeus Metz - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):441-465.
    Given a 21st century context of sophisticated market economies and other Western influences such as Christianity, what similarities and differences are there between characteristic indigenous values of sub-Saharan Africa and China, and how do they continue to influence everyday life in these societies? Establishing that central to both non-Western, indigenous value systems are ideals of harmonious relationships, I compare and contrast traditional African and Chinese conceptions of harmony and analyze a number of respects in which an appeal to this (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  3. Values and Uncertainties in the Predictions of Global Climate Models.Eric Winsberg - 2012 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (2):111-137.
    Over the last several years, there has been an explosion of interest and attention devoted to the problem of Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) in climate science—that is, to giving quantitative estimates of the degree of uncertainty associated with the predictions of global and regional climate models. The technical challenges associated with this project are formidable, and so the statistical community has understandably devoted itself primarily to overcoming them. But even as these technical challenges are being met, a number of persistent conceptual (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  4. Nonepistemic Values and the Multiple Goals of Science.Kevin C. Elliott & Daniel J. McKaughan - 2014 - Philosophy of Science 81 (1):1-21.
    Recent efforts to argue that nonepistemic values have a legitimate role to play in assessing scientific models, theories, and hypotheses typically either reject the distinction between epistemic and nonepistemic values or incorporate nonepistemic values only as a secondary consideration for resolving epistemic uncertainty. Given that scientific representations can legitimately be evaluated not only based on their fit with the world but also with respect to their fit with the needs of their users, we show in two case (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   104 citations  
  5.  10
    Trust out of distrust, Edna Ullmann-Margalit.Value-Plumlist Egalitarianism - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy 99 (1).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Andrews John.Values Environmental - 2003 - Environmental Values 12 (4):539-542.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Ackrill Rob.Values Environmental - 2003 - Environmental Values 12 (4):537-539.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Sandler Ronald.Values Environmental - 2003 - Environmental Values 12 (4):543-546.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  68
    Semantic values in higher-order semantics.Stephan Krämer - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 168 (3):709-724.
    Recently, some philosophers have argued that we should take quantification of any (finite) order to be a legitimate and irreducible, sui generis kind of quantification. In particular, they hold that a semantic theory for higher-order quantification must itself be couched in higher-order terms. Øystein Linnebo has criticized such views on the grounds that they are committed to general claims about the semantic values of expressions that are by their own lights inexpressible. I show that Linnebo’s objection rests on the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  10. Values and Secondary Qualities.John McDowell - 1985 - In Ted Honderich (ed.), Morality and objectivity: a tribute to J.L. Mackie. Boston: Routledge & Kegan Paul. pp. 110-129.
    J.L. Mackie insists that ordinary evaluative thought presents itself as a matter of sensitivity to aspects of the world. And this phenomenological thesis seems correct. When one or another variety of philosophical non-cognitivism claims to capture the truth about what the experience of value is like, or (in a familiar surrogate for phenomenology) about what we mean by our evaluative language, the claim is never based on careful attention to the lived character of evaluative thought or discourse. The idea is, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   334 citations  
  11.  43
    Weak Values and Quantum Properties.A. Matzkin - 2019 - Foundations of Physics 49 (3):298-316.
    We investigate in this work the meaning of weak values through the prism of property ascription in quantum systems. Indeed, the weak measurements framework contains only ingredients of the standard quantum formalism, and as such weak measurements are from a technical point of view uncontroversial. However attempting to describe properties of quantum systems through weak values—the output of weak measurements—goes beyond the usual interpretation of quantum mechanics, that relies on eigenvalues. We first recall the usual form of property (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  12. African Values, Human Rights and Group Rights: A Philosophical Foundation for the Banjul Charter.Thaddeus Metz - 2014 - In Oche Onazi (ed.), African Legal Theory and Contemporary Problems: Critical Essays. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 131-51.
    A communitarian perspective, which is characteristic of African normative thought, accords some kind of primacy to society or a group, whereas human rights are by definition duties that others have to treat individuals in certain ways, even when not doing so would be better for others. Is there any place for human rights in an Afro-communitarian political and legal philosophy, and, if so, what is it? I seek to answer these questions, in part by critically exploring one of the most (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13.  10
    The Values of the World Against the ‘World’ of Values: Practical Contradictions of Economic Theories of ‘Welfare’.João Medeiros - 2005 - Journal of Critical Realism 4 (1):62-88.
    This paper tries to disclose the abstract manner in which orthodox theories of ‘welfare’ conceive of social values and the consequences of such subjective treatment of values for theory itself and for praxis. The interest here resides particularly in the demonstration that the abstract articulation of social values stems from the admission of determinate ontological tenets, which characterise a profoundly conservative worldview. As the realisation of some of the values considered by orthodox theories of ‘welfare’ demands (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  16
    Valdar parve.Value-Neutral Paternalism - 2001 - In Rein Vihalemm (ed.), Estonian studies in the history and philosophy of science. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 219--271.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Epistemic values and the argument from inductive risk.Daniel Steel - 2010 - Philosophy of Science 77 (1):14-34.
    Critics of the ideal of value‐free science often assume that they must reject the distinction between epistemic and nonepistemic values. I argue that this assumption is mistaken and that the distinction can be used to clarify and defend the argument from inductive risk, which challenges the value‐free ideal. I develop the idea that the characteristic feature of epistemic values is that they promote, either intrinsically or extrinsically, the attainment of truths. This proposal is shown to answer common objections (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   105 citations  
  16. Embedding Values in Artificial Intelligence (AI) Systems.Ibo van de Poel - 2020 - Minds and Machines 30 (3):385-409.
    Organizations such as the EU High-Level Expert Group on AI and the IEEE have recently formulated ethical principles and (moral) values that should be adhered to in the design and deployment of artificial intelligence (AI). These include respect for autonomy, non-maleficence, fairness, transparency, explainability, and accountability. But how can we ensure and verify that an AI system actually respects these values? To help answer this question, I propose an account for determining when an AI system can be said (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  17.  10
    Values in Science.Ernan McMullin - 2000 - In W. Newton-Smith (ed.), A companion to the philosophy of science. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell. pp. 550–560.
    A century ago, nearly all of those who wrote about the nature of science would have been in agreement that science ought to be “value‐free.” This had been a particular emphasis on the part of the first positivists, as it would later be on the part of their twentieth‐century successors. Science, so it was said, deals with facts, and facts and values are irreducibly distinct. Facts are objective; they are what we seek in our knowledge of the world. (...) are subjective; they bear the mark of human interest; they are the radically individual products of feeling and desire. Fact and value cannot, therefore, mix. Value cannot be inferred from fact; fact ought not be influenced by value. There were philosophers, notably some in the Kantian tradition, who viewed the relation of the human individual to the universalist aspirations of science rather differently. But the legacy of three centuries of largely empiricist reflection on the “new” sciences ushered in by Galileo and his successors was as unqualified in its distrust of value as in its extolling of the virtues of fact (see galileo). (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  18. Family Values: The Ethics of Parent-Child Relationships.Harry Brighouse & Adam Swift - 2014 - Princeton University Press.
    The family is hotly contested ideological terrain. Some defend the traditional two-parent heterosexual family while others welcome its demise. Opinions vary about how much control parents should have over their children's upbringing. Family Values provides a major new theoretical account of the morality and politics of the family, telling us why the family is valuable, who has the right to parent, and what rights parents should—and should not—have over their children. Harry Brighouse and Adam Swift argue that parent-child relationships (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   110 citations  
  19.  78
    The ABCs of Relational Values: Environmental Values That Include Aspects of Both Intrinsic and Instrumental Valuing.Anna Https://Orcidorg Deplazes-Zemp & Mollie Https://Orcidorg Chapman - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (6):669-693.
    In this paper we suggest an interpretation of the concept of 'relational value' that could be useful in both environmental ethics and empirical analyses. We argue that relational valuing includes aspects of intrinsic and instrumental valuing. If relational values are attributed, objects are appreciated because the relationship with them contributes to the human flourishing component of well-being (instrumental aspect). At the same time, attributing relational value involves genuine esteem for the valued item (intrinsic aspect). We also introduce the notions (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  20.  17
    Articulating Values Through Identity Work: Advancing Family Business Ethics Research.Marleen Dieleman & Juliette Koning - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 163 (4):675-687.
    Family values are argued to enable ethical family business conduct. However, how these arise, evolve, and how family leaders articulate them is less understood. Using an ‘identity work’ approach, this paper finds that the values underpinning identity work: arise from multiple sources, evolve in tandem with the context; and, that their articulation is relational and aspirational, rather than merely historical. Prior research mostly understood family values as rooted in the past and relatively stable, but our rhetorical analysis (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  21.  63
    The Role of Personal Values in Fair Trade Consumption.Caroline Josephine Doran - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):549-563.
    Research in the U. S. on fair trade consumption is sparse. Therefore, little is known as to what motivates U. S. consumers to buy fair trade products. This study sought to determine which values are salient to American fair trade consumption. The data were gathered via a Web-based version of the Schwartz Value Survey (SVS) and were gleaned from actual consumers who purchase fair trade products from a range of Internet-based fair trade retailers. This study established that indeed there (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  22. Bias and values in scientific research.Torsten Wilholt - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (1):92-101.
    When interests and preferences of researchers or their sponsors cause bias in experimental design, data interpretation or dissemination of research results, we normally think of it as an epistemic shortcoming. But as a result of the debate on science and values, the idea that all extra-scientific influences on research could be singled out and separated from pure science is now widely believed to be an illusion. I argue that nonetheless, there are cases in which research is rightfully regarded as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   124 citations  
  23.  77
    Ethical values and social care robots for older people: an international qualitative study.Heather Draper & Tom Sorell - 2017 - Ethics and Information Technology 19 (1):49-68.
    Values such as respect for autonomy, safety, enablement, independence, privacy and social connectedness should be reflected in the design of social robots. The same values should affect the process by which robots are introduced into the homes of older people to support independent living. These values may, however, be in tension. We explored what potential users thought about these values, and how the tensions between them could be resolved. With the help of partners in the ACCOMPANY (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  24.  38
    The Constitutive Values of Science.Hugh Lacey - 1997 - Principia: An International Journal of Epistemology 1 (1):3–40.
    Cognitive values are the characteristics that are constitutive of good theories, the criteria to which we appeal when choosing among competing theories. I argue that, in order to count as a cognitive value, a characteristic must be needed to explain actually made theory choices, and its cognitive significance must be well defended especially in view of considerations derived from the objective of science. A number of proposed objectives of science are entertained, and it is argued that adopting a par-ticular (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  25. Plural and conflicting values.Michael Stocker - 1989 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Plural and conflicting values are often held to be conceptually problematic, threatening the very possibility of ethics, or at least rational ethics. Rejecting this view, Stocker first demonstrates why it is so important to understand the issues raised by plural and conflicting values, focusing on Aristotle's treatment of them. He then shows that plurality and conflict are commonplace and generally unproblematic features of our everyday choice and action, and that they do allow for a sound and rational ethics.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   112 citations  
  26. Science, institutions, and values.C. Mantzavinos - 2020 - European Journal of Philosophy 29 (2):379-392.
    This paper articulates and defends three interconnected claims: first, that the debate on the role of values for science misses a crucial dimension, the institutional one; second, that institutions occupy the intermediate level between scientific activities and values and that they are to be systematically integrated into the analysis; third, that the appraisal of the institutions of science with respect to values should be undertaken within the premises of a comparative approach rather than an ideal approach. Hence, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  27. Using Democratic Values in Science: An Objection and Response.Andrew Schroeder - 2017 - Philosophy of Science 84 (5):1044-1054.
    Many philosophers of science have argued that social and ethical values have a significant role to play in core parts of the scientific process. This naturally suggests the following question: when such value choices need to be made, which or whose values should be used? A common answer to this question turns to democratic values—the values of the public or its representatives. I argue that this imposes a morally significant burden on certain scientists, effectively requiring them (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  28. The Values of the Virtual.Rami Ali - 2023 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 40 (2):231-245.
    How do we assign values to virtual items, which include virtual objects, properties, events, subjects, worlds, environments, and experiences? In this article, I offer a framework for answering this question. After considering different value theses in the literature, I argue that whether we think these theses mutually exclusive or not turns on our view about the number of value-salient kinds virtual items belong to. Virtual monism is the view that virtual Xs belong to only one value-salient kind in relation (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  29. Values in science.Ernan McMullin - 2012 - Zygon 47 (4):686-709.
    In this essay, which was his presidential address to the Philosophy of Science Association, Ernan McMullin argued that the watershed between “classic” philosophy of science and the “new” philosophy of science can best be understood by analyzing the change in our perception of the role played by values in science. He begins with some general remarks about the nature of value, goes on to explore some of the historical sources for the claim that judgement in science is value‐laden, and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   124 citations  
  30. Traditional Morality and Sacred Values.David McPherson - 2017 - Analyse & Kritik 39 (1):41-62.
    This essay gives an account of how traditional morality is best understood and also why it is worth defending (even if some reform is needed) and how this might be done. Traditional morality is first contrasted with supposedly more enlightened forms of morality, such as utilitarianism and liberal Kantianism (i.e., autonomy-centered ethics). The focus here is on certain sacred values that are central to traditional morality and which highlight this contrast and bring out the attractions of traditional morality. Next, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  31.  23
    Existential Values and Insights in Western and Eastern Management: Approaches to Managerial Self-Development.Michal Müller & Jaroslava Kubátová - 2022 - Philosophy of Management 21 (2):219-243.
    Continual pressure on managers, their efficiency, and the need to search for novel solutions to problems can lead to psychologically demanding situations. In efforts to understand the main obstacles to work and to effectively manage work-related processes, and in the need to achieve personal development, new approaches that are based on existential philosophies emerge. The aim of this article is to highlight the ways in which existential approaches have been used or discussed in management and to show that existential themes (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32.  22
    Studying values about childhood using networked photography on Instagram.Ayşenur Benevento - 2022 - Semiotica 2022 (246):19-47.
    This study examines adults’ postings of photos of children on social media and offers a unique methodological approach to studying visual data. A major innovation of this study is first, to enact the concept and method of narrative inquiry to the digital photographs. Having applied this method, the study also offers findings about the diverse values that emerge across two specific digital parenting cultures organized via Instagram hashtags of #fashionkids and #letthekids. Values analysis of 500 photographs indicated that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33.  16
    Values, Motives, and Organic Food Consumption in China: A Moderating Role of Perceived Uncertainty.Sheng Wei, Furong Liu, Shengxiang She & Rong Wu - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    The present research attempts to understand the importance of altruistic and egoistic values in determining consumers’ motives and intention to purchase organic foods. Using the face-to-face survey approach, a total of 1,067 responses were collected from consumers in China. Data analysis was performed using a two-step structural equation modeling approach, i.e., measurement and structural models. The findings indicated that both values influence the intention to purchase organic foods through the mediation of motives. Specifically, the altruistic value influences the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  34.  47
    Ethical Values and Long-term Orientation.Jennifer L. Nevins, William O. Bearden & Bruce Money - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 71 (3):261-274.
    Lapses in ethical conduct by those in corporate and public authority worldwide have given business researchers and practitioners alike cause to re-examine the antecedents to personal ethical values. We explore the relationship between ethical values and an individual’s long-term orientation or LTO, defined as the degree to which one plans for and considers the future, as well as values traditions of the past. Our study also examines the role of work ethic and conservative attitudes in the formation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  35. Cultural values, plagiarism, and fairness: When plagiarism gets in the way of learning.Niall Hayes & Lucas D. Introna - 2005 - Ethics and Behavior 15 (3):213 – 231.
    The dramatic increase in the number of overseas students studying in the United Kingdom and other Western countries has required academics to reevaluate many aspects of their own, and their institutions', practices. This article considers differing cultural values among overseas students toward plagiarism and the implications this may have for postgraduate education in a Western context. Based on focus-group interviews, questionnaires, and informal discussions, we report the views of plagiarism among students in 2 postgraduate management programs, both of which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  36. Intrinsic values and reasons for action.Ralph Wedgwood - 2009 - Philosophical Issues 19 (1):342-363.
    What reasons for action do we have? What explains why we have these reasons? This paper articulates some of the basic structural features of a theory that would provide answers to these questions. According to this theory, reasons for action are all grounded in intrinsic values, but in a way that makes room for a thoroughly non-consequentialist view of the way in which intrinsic values generate reasons for aaction.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  37. Personal Values as A Catalyst for Corporate Social Entrepreneurship.Christine A. Hemingway - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (3):233-249.
    The literature acknowledges a distinction between immoral, amoral and moral management. This paper makes a case for the employee (at any level) as a moral agent, even though the paper begins by highlighting a body of evidence which suggests that individual moral agency is sacrificed at work and is compromised in deference to other pressures. This leads to a discussion about the notion of discretion and an examination of a separate, contrary body of literature which indicates that some individuals in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  38. Values in Science: The Case of Scientific Collaboration.Kristina Rolin - 2015 - Philosophy of Science 82 (2):157-177.
    Much of the literature on values in science is limited in its perspective because it focuses on the role of values in individual scientists’ decision making, thereby ignoring the context of scientific collaboration. I examine the epistemic structure of scientific collaboration and argue that it gives rise to two arguments showing that moral and social values can legitimately play a role in scientists’ decision to accept something as scientific knowledge. In the case of scientific collaboration some moral (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  39.  57
    Is Science Value Free?: Values and Scientific Understanding.Hugh Lacey - 1999 - New York: Routledge.
    Exploring the role of values in scientific inquiry, Hugh Lacey examines the nature and meaning of values, and looks at challenges to the view, posed by postmodernists, feminists, radical ecologists, Third-World advocates and religious fundamentalists, that science is value free. He also focuses on discussions of 'development', especially in Third World countries. This paperback edition includes a new preface.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   138 citations  
  40.  28
    Do Traditional Chinese Cultural Values Nourish a Market for Pirated CDs?Wendy W. N. Wan, Chung-Leung Luk, Oliver H. M. Yau, Alan C. B. Tse, Leo Y. M. Sin & Kenneth K. Kwong - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S1):185-196.
    On one hand, Chinese consumers are well known for conspicuous consumption and the adoption of luxury products and named brands. On the other hand, they also have a bad reputation for buying counterfeit products. Their simultaneous preferences for two contrasting types of product present a paradox that has not been addressed in the literature. This study attempts to present an explanation of this paradox by examining the effects of traditional Chinese cultural values and consumer values on consumers’ deontological (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  41.  39
    Current periodical articles 465.Why do We Value Knowledge & Ward E. Jones - 1997 - American Philosophical Quarterly 34 (4).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  42.  58
    Values that create value: Socially responsible business practices in SMEs – empirical evidence from German companies.Eva-Maria Hammann, André Habisch & Harald Pechlaner - 2008 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 18 (1):37-51.
    Socially responsible business and ethical behaviour of companies have been of interest to academia and practice for decades. But the focus has almost exclusively been on large corporations while small- and medium-sized enterprises (SME) have not received as much attention. Thus, this paper focuses on socially responsible business practices of SME entrepreneurs or owner–managers in Germany. Based on the assumption that decision-makers in SMEs are the central point where all business activities start, members of a German entrepreneurs association were approached (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  43. African Values and Capital Punishment.Thaddeus Metz - 2011 - In Gerard Walmsley (ed.), African Philosophy and the Future of Africa. Council for Research in Values and Philosophy. pp. 83-90.
    What is the strongest argument grounded in African values, i.e., those salient among indigenous peoples below the Sahara desert, for abolishing capital punishment? I defend a particular answer to this question, one that invokes an under-theorized conception of human dignity. Roughly, I maintain that the death penalty is nearly always morally unjustified, and should therefore be abolished, because it degrades people’s special capacity for communal relationships. To defend this claim, I proceed by clarifying what I aim to achieve in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  88
    Facts, Values, and Norms: Essays Toward a Morality of Consequence.Peter Railton - 2003 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In our everyday lives we struggle with the notions of why we do what we do and the need to assign values to our actions. Somehow, it seems possible through experience and life to gain knowledge and understanding of such matters. Yet once we start delving deeper into the concepts that underwrite these domains of thought and actions, we face a philosophical disappointment. In contrast to the world of facts, values and morality seem insecure, uncomfortably situated, easily influenced (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   55 citations  
  45.  33
    Science, Values, and Citizens.Heather Douglas - 2017 - In Marcus P. Adams, Zvi Biener, Uljana Feest & Jacqueline Anne Sullivan (eds.), Eppur Si Muove: Doing History and Philosophy of Science with Peter Machamer: A Collection of Essays in Honor of Peter Machamer. Dordrecht: Springer.
    Science is one of the most important forces in contemporary society. The most reliable source of knowledge about the world, science shapes the technological possibilities before us, informs public policy, and is crucial to measuring the efficacy of public policy. Yet it is not a simple repository of facts on which we can draw. It is an ongoing process of evidence gathering, discovery, contestation, and criticism. I will argue that an understanding of the nature of science and the scientific process (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  46.  14
    Personality, Values, Culture: An Evolutionary Approach.Ronald Fischer - 2017 - Cambridge University Press.
    Humans are complex social beings. To understand human behaviour, an integrated perspective is required - one which considers both what we regularly do and what motivates us. Personality, Values, Culture uses an evolutionary perspective to look at the similarities and differences in personality and values across modern societies. Integrating research on personality and human values into a functional framework that highlights their underlying compatibilities, Fischer describes how personality is shaped by the complex interplay between genes and the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  47.  33
    Experiencing Values in the Flow of Events: A Phenomenological Approach to Relational Values.Christophe Gilliand - 2021 - Environmental Values 30 (6):715-736.
    This paper explores the notion of 'relational values' from a phenomenological point of view. In the first place, it stresses that in order to make full sense of relational values, we need to approach them through a relational ontology that surpasses dualistic descriptions of the world structured around the subject and the object. With this aim, the paper turns to ecophenomenology's attempt to apprehend values from a first-person perspective embedded in the lifeworld, where our entanglement with other (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  48.  41
    Reasons, Values and Agent‐Relativity.R. Jay Wallace - 2010 - Dialectica 64 (4):503-528.
    According to T. M. Scanlon's buck‐passing account, the normative realm of reasons is in some sense prior to the domain of value. Intrinsic value is not itself a property that provides us with reasons; rather, to be good is to have some other reason‐giving property, so that facts about intrinsic value amount to facts about how we have reason to act and to respond. The paper offers an interpretation and defense of this approach to the relation between reasons and (...). I start by acknowledging the role that substantive values play in specifications of our reasons, noting that this poses an apparent challenge to the buck‐passing account. The challenge can be met, however, if we adopt a deliberative understanding of substantive value, an interpretation that I proceed to develop and defend. In conclusion I consider recent attempts to capture the agent‐relativity of reasons within a teleological framework for thinking about the relation between reasons and values. I argue that these approaches rest on a deliberative understanding of value; the teleological framework thus turns out to illustrate the basic insight of the buck‐passing approach, rather than offering an alternative to it. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  49.  10
    Values, neo-Kantianism, and the development of Weberian methodology.Thomas W. Segady - 1987 - New York: P. Lang.
    The works of Max Weber have generated a most promising interest in the social sciences with regard to his contribution to contemporary thought. While many of his substantive insights have been recognized, the attention accorded his methodological works has been comparatively scant, and often is a mere reflection of the scattered manner in which Weber himself often pursued this topic. Despite the many confusions and contradictions in Weber's methodological thought, a Weberian methodological program can be constructed from his writings. By (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  50. Science, Values, and Citizens.Heather Douglas - 2017 - In Oppure Si Mouve: Doing History and Philosophy of Science with Peter Machamer. pp. 83-96.
    Science is one of the most important forces in contemporary society. The most reliable source of knowledge about the world, science shapes the technological possibilities before us, informs public policy, and is crucial to measuring the efficacy of public policy. Yet it is not a simple repository of facts on which we can draw. It is an ongoing process of evidence gathering, discovery, contestation, and criticism. I will argue that an understanding of the nature of science and the scientific process (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
1 — 50 / 992