13 found
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  1.  25
    Appealing to the crowd: ethical justifications in Canadian medical crowdfunding campaigns.Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks, Annalise Mathers & Peter Chow-White - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (6):364-367.
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  2.  30
    How Medical Tourism Enables Preferential Access to Care: Four Patterns from the Canadian Context.Jeremy Snyder, Rory Johnston, Valorie A. Crooks, Jeff Morgan & Krystyna Adams - 2017 - Health Care Analysis 25 (2):138-150.
    Medical tourism is the practice of traveling across international borders with the intention of accessing medical care, paid for out-of-pocket. This practice has implications for preferential access to medical care for Canadians both through inbound and outbound medical tourism. In this paper, we identify four patterns of medical tourism with implications for preferential access to care by Canadians: Inbound medical tourism to Canada’s public hospitals; Inbound medical tourism to a First Nations reserve; Canadian patients opting to go abroad for medical (...)
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  3.  27
    Medical Tourism and Bariatric Surgery: More Moral Challenges.Jeremy Snyder & Valorie A. Crooks - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):28-30.
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  4.  35
    New ethical perspectives on medical tourism in the developing world.Jeremy Snyder & Valorie A. Crooks - 2012 - Developing World Bioethics 12 (1):iii-vi.
  5.  13
    Examining the language–place–healthcare intersection in the context of Canadian homecare nursing.Melissa D. Giesbrecht, Valorie A. Crooks & Kelli I. Stajduhar - 2014 - Nursing Inquiry 21 (1):79-90.
    Currently, much of the western world is experiencing a shift in the places where care is provided, namely from institutional settings like hospitals to diverse community settings such as the home. However, little is known about how language and the physical and social aspects of place interact to influence how health‐care is delivered and experienced in the home environment. Drawing on ethnographic participant observations of homecare nursing visits and semi‐structured interviews with Canadian family caregivers, care recipients and nurses, the intersection (...)
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  6.  62
    Promoting social responsibility amongst health care users: medical tourists' perspectives on an information sheet regarding ethical concerns in medical tourism.Krystyna Adams, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2013 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 8:19.
    Medical tourists, persons that travel across international borders with the intention to access non-emergency medical care, may not be adequately informed of safety and ethical concerns related to the practice of medical tourism. Researchers indicate that the sources of information frequently used by medical tourists during their decision-making process may be biased and/or lack comprehensive information regarding individual safety and treatment outcomes, as well as potential impacts of the medical tourism industry on third parties. This paper explores the feedback from (...)
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  7.  37
    Developing an informational tool for ethical engagement in medical tourism.Krystyna Adams, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 12:4.
    BackgroundMedical tourism, the practice of persons intentionally travelling across international boundaries to access medical care, has drawn increasing attention from researchers, particularly in relation to potential ethical concerns of this practice. Researchers have expressed concern for potential negative impacts to individual safety, public health within both countries of origin for medical tourists and destination countries, and global health equity. However, these ethical concerns are not discussed within the sources of information commonly provided to medical tourists, and as such, medical tourists (...)
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  8.  26
    Can We Care for Aging Persons without Worsening Global Inequities? The Case of Long-Term Care Worker Migration from the Anglophone Caribbean.Jeremy Snyder & Valorie A. Crooks - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (3).
    The international migration of health workers, including long-term care workers for aging populations, contributes to a shortage of these workers in many parts of the world. In the Anglophone Caribbean, LCW shortages and the migration of nurses to take on LCW positions abroad threaten the health of local populations and widen global inequities in health. Many responses have been proposed to address the international migration of health workers generally, including making it more difficult for these workers to emigrate and increasing (...)
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  9.  12
    Guidelines for Reducing the Negative Public Health Impacts of Medical Tourism.Jeremy Snyder & Valorie A. Crooks - 2012 - BioéthiqueOnline 1:12.
    International travel for medical care, or medical tourism, creates ethical and safety concerns for patients. Guidelines could be developed and distributed to help address these concerns, but they may at the same time appear to endorse this practice.
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  10.  9
    Is there room for privacy in medical crowdfunding?Jeremy Snyder & Valorie A. Crooks - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):e49-e49.
    When people use online platforms to solicit funds from others for health-related needs, they are engaging in medical crowdfunding. This form of crowdfunding is growing in popularity, and its visibility is increasing as campaigns are commonly shared via social networking. A number of ethical issues have been raised about medical crowdfunding, one of which is that it introduces a number of privacy concerns. While campaigners are encouraged to share very personal details to encourage donations, the sharing of such details may (...)
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  11.  16
    Developing an informational tool for ethical engagement in medical tourism.Krystyna Adams, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2017 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2017 12:1 12 (1):4.
    Medical tourism, the practice of persons intentionally travelling across international boundaries to access medical care, has drawn increasing attention from researchers, particularly in relation to potential ethical concerns of this practice. Researchers have expressed concern for potential negative impacts to individual safety, public health within both countries of origin for medical tourists and destination countries, and global health equity. However, these ethical concerns are not discussed within the sources of information commonly provided to medical tourists, and as such, medical tourists (...)
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  12. Risk communication and informed consent in the medical tourism industry: A thematic content analysis of canadian broker websites. [REVIEW]Kali Penney, Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks & Rory Johnston - 2011 - BMC Medical Ethics 12 (1):17-.
    Background: Medical tourism, thought of as patients seeking non-emergency medical care outside of their home countries, is a growing industry worldwide. Canadians are amongst those engaging in medical tourism, and many are helped in the process of accessing care abroad by medical tourism brokers - agents who specialize in making international medical care arrangements for patients. As a key source of information for these patients, brokers are likely to play an important role in communicating the risks and benefits of undergoing (...)
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  13.  67
    “Do your homework…and then hope for the best”: the challenges that medical tourism poses to Canadian family physicians’ support of patients’ informed decision-making. [REVIEW]Jeremy Snyder, Valorie A. Crooks, Rory Johnston & Shafik Dharamsi - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):37.
    Medical tourism—the practice where patients travel internationally to privately access medical care—may limit patients’ regular physicians’ abilities to contribute to the informed decision-making process. We address this issue by examining ways in which Canadian family doctors’ typical involvement in patients’ informed decision-making is challenged when their patients engage in medical tourism.
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