Results for 'User Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction'

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  1.  3
    Human-computer interaction emotional design and innovative cultural and creative product design.Zhimin Gao & Jiaxi Huang - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    To make the interface design of computer application system better, meet the psychological and emotional needs of users, and be more humanized, the emotional factor is increasingly valued by interface designers. In the design of human-computer interaction graphical interfaces, the designer attaches great importance to the emotional design of the interface, and enhances the humanized design of the interface, which cannot only improve the comfort of the interface, but also improve the fun of the interface, (...)
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  2. The role of cognitive modeling for user interface design representations: An epistemological analysis of knowledge engineering in the context of human-computer interaction[REVIEW]Markus F. Peschl & Chris Stary - 1998 - Minds and Machines 8 (2):203-236.
    In this paper we review some problems with traditional approaches for acquiring and representing knowledge in the context of developing user interfaces. Methodological implications for knowledge engineering and for human-computer interaction are studied. It turns out that in order to achieve the goal of developing human-oriented (in contrast to technology-oriented) human-computer interfaces developers have to develop sound knowledge of the structure and the representational dynamics of the cognitive system which is interacting (...)
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  3.  6
    Exploration of micro-video teaching mode of college students using deep learning and humancomputer interaction.Yao Liu, Na Cai, Zizai Zhang & Hai Fu - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    In order to improve the efficiency of teaching and learning in Colleges and Universities, this work combines the Browser/Server framework with Model View Presenter technology to build a college student–oriented micro-video teaching system based on Deep Learning and HumanComputer Interaction technology. Firstly, it makes an in-depth analysis of the problems in the classroom teaching of Chinese CAUs. Three functional modules are designed for the micro-video online teaching platform: video management, user learning, and system management. Then, it (...)
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  4.  9
    Automatic facial expression interpretation: Where human-computer interaction, artificial intelligence and cognitive science intersect.Christine L. Lisetti & Diane J. Schiano - 2000 - Pragmatics and Cognition 8 (1):185-235.
    We discuss here one of our projects, aimed at developing an automatic facial expression interpreter, mainly in terms of signaled emotions. We present some of the relevant findings on facial expressions from cognitive science and psychology that can be understood by and be useful to researchers in Human-Computer Interaction and Artificial Intelligence. We then give an overview of HCI applications involving automated facial expression recognition, we survey some of the latest progresses in this area reached by various (...)
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  5.  54
    The sorcerer and the apprentice. Human-computer interaction today.W. Oberschelp - 1998 - AI and Society 12 (1-2):97-104.
    Human-computer interaction today has got a touch of magic: Without understanding the causal coherence, using a computer seems to become the art to use the right spell with the mouse as the magic wand — the sorcerer's staff. Goethes's poem admits an allegoric interpretation. We explicate the analogy between using a computer and casting a spell with emphasis on teaching magic skills. The art to create an ergonomic user interface has to take care of (...)
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  6.  54
    Automatic facial expression interpretation: where human computer interaction, artificial intelligence and cognitive science intersect.Christine L. Lisetti & Diane J. Schiano - 2000 - Pragmatics and Cognition 8 (1):185-236.
    We discuss here one of our projects, aimed at developing an automatic facial expression interpreter, mainly in terms of signaled emotions. We present some of the relevant findings on facial expressions from cognitive science and psychology that can be understood by and be useful to researchers in Human-Computer Interaction and Artificial Intelligence. We then give an overview of HCI applications involving automated facial expression recognition, we survey some of the latest progresses in this area reached by various (...)
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  7. An Analysis of the Interaction Between Intelligent Software Agents and Human Users.Christopher Burr, Nello Cristianini & James Ladyman - 2018 - Minds and Machines 28 (4):735-774.
    Interactions between an intelligent software agent and a human user are ubiquitous in everyday situations such as access to information, entertainment, and purchases. In such interactions, the ISA mediates the user’s access to the content, or controls some other aspect of the user experience, and is not designed to be neutral about outcomes of user choices. Like human users, ISAs are driven by goals, make autonomous decisions, and can learn from experience. Using ideas from (...)
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  8.  16
    HumanComputer Interaction Research Needs a Theory of Social Structure: The Dark Side of Digital Technology Systems Hidden in User Experience.Ryan Gunderson - 2022 - Human Studies 45 (3):529-550.
    A sociological revision of Aron Gurwitsch provides a helpful layered theory of conscious experience as a four-domain structure: _the theme_, _the thematic field_, _the halo_, and _the social horizon_. The social horizon—the totality of the social world that is unknown, vaguely known, taken for granted, or ignored by the subject despite objectively influencing the thoughts and actions of the subject—, helps conceptualize how everyday humancomputer interaction (HCI) can obscure social structures. Two examples illustrate the usefulness of this (...)
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  9.  50
    Brain-Computer Interaction and Medical Access to the Brain: Individual, Social and Ethical Implications.Elisabeth Hildt - 2010 - Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 4 (3).
    This paper discusses current clinical applications and possible future uses of brain-computer interfaces as a means for communication, motor control and entertainment. After giving a brief account of the various approaches to direct brain-computer interaction, the paper will address individual, social and ethical implications of BCI technology to extract signals from the brain. These include reflections on medical and psychosocial benefits and risks, user control, informed consent, autonomy and privacy as well as ethical and social (...)
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  10.  5
    HumanComputer Interaction-Oriented African Literature and African Philosophy Appreciation.Jianlan Wen & Yuming Piao - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    African literature has played a major role in changing and shaping perceptions about African people and their way of life for the longest time. Unlike western cultures that are associated with advanced forms of writing, African literature is oral in nature, meaning it has to be recited and even performed. Although Africa has an old tribal culture, African philosophy is a new and strange idea among us. Although the problem of “universality” of African philosophy actually refers to the question of (...)
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  11.  6
    The impact of different age-friendly smart home interface styles on the interaction behavior of elderly users.Chengmin Zhou, Yawen Qian, Ting Huang, Jake Kaner & Yurong Zhang - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    Smart homes create a beneficial environment for the lives of elderly people and enhance the quality of their home lives. This study aims to explore the design of age-friendly interfaces that can meet the emotional needs of self-care elderly people from the perspective of functional realization of the operating interface. Sixteen elderly users aged fifty-five and above were selected as subjects with healthy eyes and no excessive drooping eyelids to obscure them. Four representative age-friendly applications with different interface designs (...)
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  12. Technological unemployment and human disenhancement.Michele Loi - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (3):201-210.
    This paper discusses the concept of “human disenhancement”, i.e. the worsening of human individual abilities and expectations through technology. The goal is provoking ethical reflection on technological innovation outside the biomedical realm, in particular the substitution of human work with computer-driven automation. According to some widely accepted economic theories, automatization and computerization are responsible for the disappearance of many middle-class jobs. I argue that, if that is the case, a technological innovation can be a cause of (...)
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  13.  41
    How to do robots with words: a performative view of the moral status of humans and nonhumans.Mark Coeckelbergh - 2023 - Ethics and Information Technology 25 (3):1-9.
    Moral status arguments are typically formulated as descriptive statements that tell us something about the world. But philosophy of language teaches us that language can also be used performatively: we do things with words and use words to try to get others to do things. Does and should this theory extend to what we say about moral status, and what does it mean? Drawing on Austin, Searle, and Butler and further developing relational views of moral status, this article explores what (...)
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  14.  11
    Humancomputer interaction tools with gameful design for critical thinking the media ecosystem: a classification framework.Elena Musi, Lorenzo Federico & Gianni Riotta - forthcoming - AI and Society:1-13.
    In response to the ever-increasing spread of online disinformation and misinformation, several humancomputer interaction tools to enhance data literacy have been developed. Among them, many employ elements of gamification to increase user engagement and reach out to a broader audience. However, there are no systematic criteria to analyze their relevance and impact for building fake news resilience, partly due to the lack of a common understanding of data literacy. In this paper we put forward an operationalizable (...)
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  15. Computer systems and responsibility: A normative look at technological complexity.Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers - 2005 - Ethics and Information Technology 7 (2):99-107.
    In this paper, we focus attention on the role of computer system complexity in ascribing responsibility. We begin by introducing the notion of technological moral action (TMA). TMA is carried out by the combination of a computer system user, a system designer (developers, programmers, and testers), and a computer system (hardware and software). We discuss three sometimes overlapping types of responsibility: causal responsibility, moral responsibility, and role responsibility. Our analysis is informed by the well-known accounts provided (...)
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  16.  26
    A sociotechnical perspective for the future of AI: narratives, inequalities, and human control.Andreas Theodorou & Laura Sartori - 2022 - Ethics and Information Technology 24 (1):1-11.
    Different people have different perceptions about artificial intelligence (AI). It is extremely important to bring together all the alternative frames of thinking—from the various communities of developers, researchers, business leaders, policymakers, and citizens—to properly start acknowledging AI. This article highlights the ‘fruitful collaboration’ that sociology and AI could develop in both social and technical terms. We discuss how biases and unfairness are among the major challenges to be addressed in such a sociotechnical perspective. First, as intelligent machines reveal their nature (...)
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  17.  72
    Human values and the design of computer technology, edited by batya Friedman.John M. Artz - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (4):305-306.
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  18.  30
    Resolving the paradox of the active user: stable suboptimal performance in interactive tasks.Wai-Tat Fu & Wayne D. Gray - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (6):901-935.
    This paper brings the intellectual tools of cognitive science to bear on resolving the “paradox of the active user” [Interfacing Thought: Cognitive Aspects of HumanComputer Interaction, Cambridge, MIT Press, MA, USA]—the persistent use of inefficient procedures in interactive tasks by experienced or even expert users when demonstrably more efficient procedures exist. The goal of this paper is to understand the roots of this paradox by finding regularities in these inefficient procedures. We examine three very different data (...)
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  19.  57
    A different way of seeing: Albert Borgmann’s philosophy of technology and humancomputer interaction[REVIEW]Daniel Fallman - 2010 - AI and Society 25 (1):53-60.
    Traditional humancomputer interaction (HCI) allowed researchers and practitioners to share and rely on the ‘five E’s’ of usability, the principle that interactive systems should be designed to be effective, efficient, engaging, error tolerant, and easy to learn. A recent trend in HCI, however, is that academic researchers as well as practitioners are becoming increasingly interested in user experiences, i.e., understanding and designing for relationships between users and artifacts that are for instance affective, engaging, fun, playable, sociable, (...)
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  20. The epistemology and ontology of human-computer interaction.Philip Brey - 2005 - Minds and Machines 15 (3-4):383-398.
    This paper analyzes epistemological and ontological dimensions of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) through an analysis of the functions of computer systems in relation to their users. It is argued that the primary relation between humans and computer systems has historically been epistemic: computers are used as information-processing and problem-solving tools that extend human cognition, thereby creating hybrid cognitive systems consisting of a human processor and an artificial processor that process information in tandem. In this (...)
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  21.  9
    Personalized Virtual Reality Human-Computer Interaction for Psychiatric and Neurological Illnesses: A Dynamically Adaptive Virtual Reality Environment That Changes According to Real-Time Feedback From Electrophysiological Signal Responses.Jacob Kritikos, Georgios Alevizopoulos & Dimitris Koutsouris - 2021 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 15.
    Virtual reality constitutes an alternative, effective, and increasingly utilized treatment option for people suffering from psychiatric and neurological illnesses. However, the currently available VR simulations provide a predetermined simulative framework that does not take into account the unique personality traits of each individual; this could result in inaccurate, extreme, or unpredictable responses driven by patients who may be overly exposed and in an abrupt manner to the predetermined stimuli, or result in indifferent, almost non-existing, reactions when the stimuli do not (...)
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  22.  29
    Transitions in humancomputer interaction: from data embodiment to experience capitalism.Tony D. Sampson - 2019 - AI and Society 34 (4):835-845.
    This article develops a critical theory of humancomputer interaction intended to test some of the assumptions and omissions made in the field as it transitions from a cognitive theoretical frame to a phenomenological understanding of user experience described by Harrison et al. as a third research paradigm and similarly Bødker :24–31; Bødker, Interactions 22):24–31, 2015) as third-wave HCI. Although this particular focus on experience has provided some novel avenues of academic enquiry, this article draws attention to (...)
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  23. Just consequentialism and computing.James H. Moor - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):61-65.
    Computer and information ethics, as well as other fields of applied ethics, need ethical theories which coherently unify deontological and consequentialist aspects of ethical analysis. The proposed theory of just consequentialism emphasizes consequences of policies within the constraints of justice. This makes just consequentialism a practical and theoretically sound approach to ethical problems of computer and information ethics.
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  24. Interaction and resistance: The recognition of intentions in new human-computer interaction.Vincent C. Müller - 2011 - In Anna Esposito, Antonietta M. Esposito, Raffaele Martone, Vincent C. Müller & Gaetano Scarpetta (eds.), Towards autonomous, adaptive, and context-aware multimodal interfaces: Theoretical and practical issues. Springer. pp. 1-7.
    Just as AI has moved away from classical AI, human-computer interaction (HCI) must move away from what I call ‘good old fashioned HCI’ to ‘new HCI’ – it must become a part of cognitive systems research where HCI is one case of the interaction of intelligent agents (we now know that interaction is essential for intelligent agents anyway). For such interaction, we cannot just ‘analyze the data’, but we must assume intentions in the other, (...)
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  25.  9
    Interacting with an embodied interface : Effects of embodied agent and voice command on smart TV interface.Kwan Min Lee, Jae-gil Lee & Young June Sah - 2022 - Interaction Studies 23 (1):116-142.
    Despite their potential for facilitating interaction between a user and computer, an embodied agent and voice command have not been examined enough for their matching effects. The current study proposes that an embodied agent and voice command generate positive evaluative outcomes, particularly when they are accompanied by each other. To test this prediction, we conducted a 2 (visual output: embodied agent vs. geometric figure) × 2 (input modality: voice command vs. remote controller) between-subjects experiment (N = 52), (...)
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  26.  30
    A willingness to be vulnerable: norm psychology and human–robot relationships.Stephen A. Setman - 2021 - Ethics and Information Technology 23 (4):815-824.
    Should we welcome social robots into interpersonal relationships? In this paper I show that an adequate answer to this question must take three factors into consideration: (1) the psychological vulnerability that characterizes ordinary interpersonal relationships, (2) the normative significance that humans attach to other people’s attitudes in such relationships, and (3) the tendency of humans to anthropomorphize and “mentalize” artificial agents, often beyond their actual capacities. I argue that we should welcome social robots into interpersonal relationships only if they are (...)
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  27.  33
    Humans, Neanderthals, robots and rights.Kamil Mamak - 2022 - Ethics and Information Technology 24 (3):1-9.
    Robots are becoming more visible parts of our life, a situation which prompts questions about their place in our society. One group of issues that is widely discussed is connected with robots’ moral and legal status as well as their potential rights. The question of granting robots rights is polarizing. Some positions accept the possibility of granting them human rights whereas others reject the notion that robots can be considered potential rights holders. In this paper, I claim that robots (...)
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  28.  24
    Moral sensitivity and the limits of artificial moral agents.Joris Graff - 2024 - Ethics and Information Technology 26 (1):1-12.
    Machine ethics is the field that strives to develop ‘artificial moral agents’ (AMAs), artificial systems that can autonomously make moral decisions. Some authors have questioned the feasibility of machine ethics, by questioning whether artificial systems can possess moral competence, or the capacity to reach morally right decisions in various situations. This paper explores this question by drawing on the work of several moral philosophers (McDowell, Wiggins, Hampshire, and Nussbaum) who have characterised moral competence in a manner inspired by Aristotle. Although (...)
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  29.  83
    Computer ethics: Its birth and its future.Terrell Ward Bynum - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (2):109-112.
    This article discusses some``historical milestones'' in computer ethics, aswell as two alternative visions of the futureof computer ethics. Topics include theimpressive foundation for computer ethics laiddown by Norbert Wiener in the 1940s and early1950s; the pioneering efforts of Donn Parker,Joseph Weizenbaum and Walter Maner in the1970s; Krystyna Gorniak's hypothesis thatcomputer ethics will evolve into ``globalethics''; and Deborah Johnson's speculation thatcomputer ethics may someday ``disappear''.
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  30. Human achievement and artificial intelligence.Brett Karlan - 2023 - Ethics and Information Technology 25 (3):1-12.
    In domains as disparate as playing Go and predicting the structure of proteins, artificial intelligence (AI) technologies have begun to perform at levels beyond which any humans can achieve. Does this fact represent something lamentable? Does superhuman AI performance somehow undermine the value of human achievements in these areas? Go grandmaster Lee Sedol suggested as much when he announced his retirement from professional Go, blaming the advances of Go-playing programs like AlphaGo for sapping his will to play the game (...)
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  31.  15
    How hiring: Dogs and humans need not apply. [REVIEW]Richard G. Epstein - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (3):227-236.
    This is a review of Hans Moravec''s book, Robot: Mere Machine to Transcendent Mind. This review raises three categories of questions relating to Moravec''s vision of the future. First, there are the ethical and social implications issues implicit in robotics research. Second, there are the soul issues, which especially relate to the prospect of the demoralization of human beings. Third, there is the issue as to whether a robot could ever be a sentient being.
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  32.  76
    Morality and Machines: Perspectives on Computer Ethics. Stacey L. Edgar.Shade Leslie Regan - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):71-73.
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  33. The Illusion of Agency in HumanComputer Interaction.Michael Madary - 2022 - Neuroethics 15 (1):1-15.
    This article makes the case that our digital devices create illusions of agency. There are times when users feel as if they are in control when in fact they are merely responding to stimuli on the screen in predictable ways. After the introduction, the second section of the article offers examples of illusions of agency that do not involve humancomputer interaction in order to show that such illusions are possible and not terribly uncommon. The third and fourth (...)
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  34.  15
    Bibliometric mapping of computer and information ethics.Richard Heersmink, Jeroen den Hoven, Nees Eck & Jan den Berg - 2011 - Ethics and Information Technology 13 (3):241-249.
    This paper presents the first bibliometric mapping analysis of the field of computer and information ethics (C&IE). It provides a map of the relations between 400 key terms in the field. This term map can be used to get an overview of concepts and topics in the field and to identify relations between information and communication technology concepts on the one hand and ethical concepts on the other hand. To produce the term map, a data set of over thousand (...)
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  35.  17
    Socializing the political: rethinking filter bubbles and social media with Hannah Arendt.Zachary Daus - 2024 - Ethics and Information Technology 26 (2):1-10.
    It is often claimed that social media accelerate political extremism by employing personalization algorithms that filter users into groups with homogenous beliefs. While an intuitive position, recent research has shown that social media users exhibit self-filtering tendencies. In this paper, I apply Hannah Arendt’s theory of political judgment to hypothesize a cause for self-filtering on social media. According to Arendt, a crucial step in political judgment is the imagination of a general standpoint of distinct yet equal perspectives, against which individuals (...)
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  36.  30
    Post-september 11: Computers, ethics and war.Richard T. De George - 2003 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (4):183-190.
    This paper considers the moralresponsibility of computer scientists withrespect to weapons development in post-911America. It does so by looking at the doctrineof jus in bello as exemplified in fourscenarios. It argues that the traditionaldoctrine should be augmented by a number ofprinciples, including the Principle of aMorally Obligatory Smart Arms Race, thePrinciple of Assistance to One's Enemies, thePrinciple of Public Debate on Weapons of MassDisruption, and the Principle of the MoralUnjustifiability of Private Wars.
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  37. Common morality and computing.Bernard Gert - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):53-60.
    This article shows how common morality can be helpful in clarifying the discussion of ethical issues that arise in computing. Since common morality does not always provide unique answers to moral questions, not all such issues can be resolved, however common morality does provide a clear answer to the question whether one can illegally copy software for a friend.
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  38.  11
    Young Children and Voice Search: What We Know From Human-Computer Interaction Research.Silvia B. Lovato & Anne Marie Piper - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Young children are prolific question-askers. The growing ubiquity of voice interfaces (e.g., Apple’s Siri, Amazon’s Alexa), as well as the availability of voice input in search fields, now make it possible for children to ask questions via Internet search when they are able to speak clearly, but before they have learned to read and write, typically between 3 and 6 years of age. The prevalence of voice search makes it important to understand children’s changing conceptions of digital devices as (...)
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  39.  4
    Learning Consistent, Interactive, and Meaningful Task‐Action Mappings: A Computational Model.Andrew Howes & Richard M. Young - 1996 - Cognitive Science 20 (3):301-356.
    Within the field of humancomputer interaction, the study of the interaction between people and computers has revealed many phenomena. For example, highly interactive devices, such as the Apple Macintosh, are often easier to learn and use than keyboard‐based devices such as Unix. Similarly, consistent interfaces are easier to learn and use than inconsistent ones. This article describes an integrated cognitive model designed to exhibit a range of these phenomena while learning task‐action mappings: action sequences for (...)
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  40.  39
    Philosophy and computing. An introduction, Luciano Floridi.Lorenzo Magnai - 2000 - Ethics and Information Technology 2 (2):137-138.
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  41.  3
    The use of cognitive psychology-based human-computer interaction tax system in ceramic industry tax collection and management and economic development of Jingdezhen city.Mingqing Jiao - 2022 - Frontiers in Psychology 13.
    This work aims to solve the complex problems of non-linearity, instability, and multiple economic factors in the tax forecast of the ceramic industry to ensure the sustainable development of the ceramic industry. The key influential indicators of the tax forecast are obtained by analyzing the principal components affecting the tax index. In addition, a human-computer interaction system is established based on cognitive psychology theory to improve the user-friendliness of tax analysis. At the same time, the tax (...)
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  42.  26
    Ethics, computing and medicine. Informatics and the transformation of health care. Kenneth W. Goodman, editor.Marian Verkerk - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (4):303-304.
  43.  8
    Morality and Machines: Perspectives on Computer Ethics. Stacey L. Edgar.Leslie Regan Shade - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):71-73.
  44.  12
    Learning Consistent, Interactive, and Meaningful Task‐Action Mappings: A Computational Model.Andrew Howes & Richard M. Young - 1996 - Cognitive Science 20 (3):301-356.
    Within the field of humancomputer interaction, the study of the interaction between people and computers has revealed many phenomena. For example, highly interactive devices, such as the Apple Macintosh, are often easier to learn and use than keyboard‐based devices such as Unix. Similarly, consistent interfaces are easier to learn and use than inconsistent ones. This article describes an integrated cognitive model designed to exhibit a range of these phenomena while learning task‐action mappings: action sequences for (...)
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  45. Reader as user: Applying interface design techniques to the Web.Karen McGrane Chauss - 1996 - Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy 1 (2).
    he World Wide Web is not just an electronic display of text and information. To navigate the WWW, readers need to make decisions about how to pursue and translate their decisions into physical actions. The Web is an interface. -/- Because the WWW shares common ground with both papertext writing and with software interfaces, theories and research from interface design, human-computer interaction, and cognitive science can be used to improve web page interfaces and make the (...)
     
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  46.  14
    Cobots, “co-operation” and the replacement of human skill.Tom Sorell - 2022 - Ethics and Information Technology 24 (4):1-12.
    Automation does not always replace human labour altogether: there is an intermediate stage of human co-existence with machines, including robots, in a production process. Cobots are robots designed to participate at close quarters with humans in such a process. I shall discuss the possible role of cobots in facilitating the eventual total elimination of human operators from production in which co-bots are initially involved. This issue is complicated by another: cobots are often introduced to workplaces with the (...)
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  47. Why robots should not be treated like animals.Deborah G. Johnson & Mario Verdicchio - 2018 - Ethics and Information Technology 20 (4):291-301.
    Responsible Robotics is about developing robots in ways that take their social implications into account, which includes conceptually framing robots and their role in the world accurately. We are now in the process of incorporating robots into our world and we are trying to figure out what to make of them and where to put them in our conceptual, physical, economic, legal, emotional and moral world. How humans think about robots, especially humanoid social robots, which elicit complex and sometimes disconcerting (...)
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  48. Information ethics: on the philosophical foundation of computer ethics.Luciano Floridi - 1999 - Ethics and Information Technology 1 (1):33–52.
    The essential difficulty about Computer Ethics' (CE) philosophical status is a methodological problem: standard ethical theories cannot easily be adapted to deal with CE-problems, which appear to strain their conceptual resources, and CE requires a conceptual foundation as an ethical theory. Information Ethics (IE), the philosophical foundational counterpart of CE, can be seen as a particular case of environmental ethics or ethics of the infosphere. What is good for an information entity and the infosphere in general? This is the (...)
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  49.  20
    Legal and ethical implications of autonomous cyber capabilities: a call for retaining human control in cyberspace.Marta Stroppa - 2023 - Ethics and Information Technology 25 (1):1-6.
  50.  42
    Refining the ethics of computer-made decisions: a classification of moral mediation by ubiquitous machines.Marlies Van de Voort, Wolter Pieters & Luca Consoli - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (1):41-56.
    In the past decades, computers have become more and more involved in society by the rise of ubiquitous systems, increasing the number of interactions between humans and IT systems. At the same time, the technology itself is getting more complex, enabling devices to act in a way that previously only humans could, based on developments in the fields of both robotics and artificial intelligence. This results in a situation in which many autonomous, intelligent and context-aware systems are involved in decisions (...)
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