Results for 'Universidad Rosario Business School Submittedelr'

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  1.  22
    Business Schools as a Positive Force for Fostering Societal Change: Meeting the Challenges of the Post-Crisis World.Eric Cornuel & Ulrich Hommel - 2012 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 31 (2):289-312.
    The purpose of the article is to encourage an intellectual debate on how business schools can meet the intellectual challenge resulting from the financial crisis. We argue that this will involve questioning the traditional paradigms of management research, will require broadening the intellectual foundation of business school activities, and will trigger revision processes to incorporate the derived learning points into degree and non-degree programs. European business schools have to cope with these challenges during a phase of (...)
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  2.  14
    Do Business Schools' Theories Negatively Influence Students Ethical Positions?Waymond Rodgers, Birgitta Påhlsson & Arne Söderbom - forthcoming - Business Ethics.
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  3. The Business School in a Changing Knowledge Landscape.Ken Starkey - 2008 - In Harry Scarbrough (ed.), The Evolution of Business Knowledge. Oxford University Press.
  4. Are Business Schools to Blame for the Financial Crisis.Jo Mackness - forthcoming - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility.
  5. Are Business Schools Brainwashing Their MBAs.Amitai Etzioni - 1989 - Business and Society Review 70:18-19.
  6.  43
    Exploring Business School Ethics.Johannes Brinkmann & Ken Peattie - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 2 (2):151-169.
    There is much more written about how and why business schools could and should talk about business ethics than about how they could “walk the talk.” When ethics is discussed, it is usually in relation to the position of business ethics within the curriculum, rather than about what does and does not constitute ethical behaviour on the part of a business school and its members. This paper seeks to explore how ethics can develop beyond the (...)
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  7. Should Business Schools Be Sunday Schools?J. Halfond - 1990 - Business and Society Review 72:54-55.
  8. Business School Ethics—An Overlooked Topic.Frederic E. Greenman & I. I. I. John F. Sherman - 1999 - Business and Society Review 104 (2):171-177.
  9. Griffith Business School.Kelli Lee Bodey - forthcoming - Philosophy.
  10.  5
    Comparing Business School Faculty Classification for Perceptions of Student Cheating.Gary Blau, Roman Szewczuk, Jennifer Fitzgerald, Dennis A. Paris & Mike Guglielmo - 2018 - Journal of Academic Ethics 16 (4):301-315.
    Faculty continue to address academic dishonesty in their classes. In this follow-up to an earlier study on general perceived faculty student cheating, using a sample of business school faculty, we compared three levels of faculty classification: full-time non-tenure track, full-time tenured/tenure-track, and part-time adjuncts. Results showed that NTTs perceived higher levels for three different types of student cheating, i.e., paper-based, forbidden teamwork, and hiring someone to take an exam. In addition, NTTs were more likely to report a student (...)
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  11.  6
    Business Schools and the Development of Responsible Leaders: A Proposition of Edgar Morin’s Transdisciplinarity.Patricia Gabaldon & Stefan Gröschl - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 153 (1):185-195.
    We propose Edgar Morin’s notion of transdisciplinarity as a complementary educational perspective for preparing business school students in addressing the complex global socio-economic and environmental challenges that our planet has been facing for some time. Morin’s notion of transdisciplinarity spans various disciplines, both within disciplines and beyond individual disciplines. Morin’s transdisciplinary approach is inquiry driven and presents a systemic/humanistic vision and form of awareness that challenges habitually dualistic and simplistic thinking. Morin’s transdisciplinarity is based on a dialogical and (...)
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  12.  13
    Do Business Schools Influence Students’ Awareness of Social Issues? Evidence From Two of Chile’s Leading MBA Programs.Mladen Koljatic & Monica Silva - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 131 (3):595-604.
    This study explores the role that business schools have in developing favorable attitudes toward business involvement in corporate social responsibility. Two cohorts of incoming students from two internationally accredited MBA programs in Chile and two cohorts of graduating students from the same institutions were compared in terms of their attitudes toward the role of business in alleviating social ills and the role they assigned to business schools in preparing managers to effectively address social issues. The attitudes (...)
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  13.  1
    Business School Rankings: The Financial Times’ Experience and Evolutions.Andrew Jack - 2022 - Business and Society 61 (4):795-800.
    The growing demand for societal impact of teaching, research, and operations necessitates fresh approaches to our analysis of business school rankings. I discuss the Financial Times’ approach and the need for fresh methods, metrics, and standards.
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  14.  11
    Business Schools at the Crossroads? A Trip Back From Sparta to Athens.Maria Jose Murcia, Hector O. Rocha & Julian Birkinshaw - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 150 (2):579-591.
    Some business schools have come under considerable criticism for what observers see as their complicit involvement in the corporate scandals and financial crises of the last 15 years. Much of the discussion about changes that schools might undertake has been focused on curriculum issues. However, revisiting the curriculum does not get at the root cause of the problem. Instead, it might create a new challenge: the risk of decoupling the discussion of the curriculum from broader issues of institutional purpose. (...)
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  15.  16
    Provocation: Business Schools and Economic Crisis – The Emperor's New Clothes: Learning From Crises?Silke Machold & Morten Huse - 2010 - International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy 4 (1):13.
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  16.  10
    Musings: Business Schools Share the Blame for Enron.Sumantra Ghoshal - 2003 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 17 (3):4-4.
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  17.  14
    The Business School’s Right to Operate: Responsibilization and Resistance.David Murillo & Steen Vallentin - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (4):743-757.
    The current crisis has come at a cost not only for big business but also for business schools. Business schools have been deemed largely responsible for developing and teaching socially dysfunctional curricula that, if anything, has served to promote and accelerate the kind of ruthless behavior and lack of self-restraint and social irresponsibility among top executives that have been seen as causing the crisis. As a result, many calls have been made for business schools to accept (...)
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  18.  18
    Educating Business Schools About Safety & Health is No Accident.Wayne H. Stewart, Donna E. Ledgerwood & Ruth C. May - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (8):919 - 926.
    This paper summarizes the consequences of safety and health inattentiveness, and reviews four primary dangers in the workplace. In addition, perspectives of employee health and safety are presented from industry and academia which provide the basis for a strong recommendation to include safety and health issues in business school curricula.
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  19.  9
    Provocation: Business Schools and Economic Crisis – Why Blame the Business Schools?Frank Bannister - 2010 - International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy 4 (1):34.
  20.  10
    Business Schools and Social Responsibility: A Dean's Perspective.John Elliott - 2004 - Business and Society Review 109 (4):567-576.
  21.  26
    Collaboration in Business Schools: A Foundation for Community Success. [REVIEW]Leland Horn & Michael Kennedy - 2008 - Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (1):7-15.
    Business schools are often thought of as being accountable for the individual student’s personal development and preparation to enter the business community. While true that business schools guide knowledge development, they must also fulfill a social contract with the business community to provide ethical entry-level business professionals. Three stakeholders, students, faculty, and the business community, are involved in developing and strengthening an understanding of ethical behavior and the serious impacts associated with an ethical lapse. (...)
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  22.  13
    Business School Ethics—An Overlooked Topic.Frederic E. Greenman & John F. Sherman Iii - 1999 - Business and Society Review 104 (2):171-177.
  23.  9
    Provocation: Business Schools and Economic Crisis – a Need for a Rethink?Michael Haynes - 2010 - International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy 4 (1):2.
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  24.  24
    Reorienting the Business School Agenda: The Case for Relevance, Rigor, and Righteousness.Andreas Birnik & Jon Billsberry - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):985-999.
    This article contributes to the current debate regarding management education and research. It frames the current business school critique as a paradox regarding the arguments for ‘self-interest’ versus ‘altruism’ as human motives. Based on this, a typology of management with four representative types labeled: unguided, altruistic, egoistic, and righteous is developed. It is proposed that the path to the future of management education and research might be found by relegitimizing the ‘altruistic’ spirit of the classics of the great (...)
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  25.  7
    Business Schools - Driving Ethics Into Mainstream: A Study in Institutional Change at the Haas School.David Raths - 2005 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 19 (4):12-12.
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  26.  5
    Business Schools - Driving Ethics Into Mainstream.David Raths - 2005 - Business Ethics 19 (4):12-12.
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  27.  8
    Provocation: Business Schools and Economic Crisis – We Are All Critical Now: But Critique of What, for Whom?Michael Saren - 2010 - International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy 4 (1):28.
  28.  23
    The Influence of Business School’s Ethical Climate on Students’ Unethical Behavior.Thomas A. Birtch & Flora F. T. Chiang - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (2):283-294.
    Business schools play an instrumental role in laying the foundations for ethical behavior and socially responsible actions in the business community. Drawing on social learning and identity theories and using data collected from undergraduate business students, we found that ethical climate was a significant predictor of unethical behavior, such that students with positive perceptions about their business school’s ethical climate were more likely to refrain from unethical behaviors. Moreover, we found that high moral and institutional (...)
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  29.  6
    Provocation: Business Schools and Economic Crisis – Narratives, Scripts and Schools: Counter-Scripts as a Response to the Credit Crisis.Kevin Morrell - 2010 - International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy 4 (1):21.
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  30. Provocation: Business Schools and Economic Crisis – The Only True Wealth is the Wealth of the Mind.Les Worrall - 2010 - International Journal of Management Concepts and Philosophy 4 (1):7.
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  31.  43
    Introducing Practical Wisdom in Business Schools.Esther Roca - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):607-620.
    This article echoes those voices that demand new approaches and ‹senses’ for management education and business programs. Much of the article is focused on showing that the polemic about the educative model of business schools has moral and epistemological foundations and opens up the debate over the type of knowledge that practitioners need to possess in order to manage organizations, and how this knowledge can be taught in management programs. The article attempts to highlight the moral dimension of (...)
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  32.  14
    Academic Honesty in the Business School: A Case Study.Jay A. Halfond - 1991 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 10 (3):101-106.
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  33.  14
    Character Education in Business Schools: Pedagogical Strategies.Alexander Hill & Ian Stewart - 1999 - Teaching Business Ethics 3 (2):179-193.
  34.  27
    The Role of Business Schools in Ethics Education in Iceland: The Managers' Perspective.Throstur Olaf Sigurjonsson, Vlad Vaiman & Audur Arna Arnardottir - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (1):1-14.
    This article explores managers’ views on various ways in which business schools can contribute to providing solid ethics education to their students, who will ultimately become the next generation of business leaders. One thousand top level managers of Icelandic firms were approached and asked a number of questions aimed at establishing their view on the relationship between ethics education and the role of business schools in forming and developing business ethics education. Icelandic businesses were badly hurt (...)
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  35.  45
    Ethical Misconduct in the Business School: A Case of Plagiarism That Turned Bitter. [REVIEW]Carlos Cabral-Cardoso - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 49 (1):75-89.
    As a result of the public demand for higher ethical standards, business schools are increasingly taking ethical matters seriously. But their effort has concentrated on teaching business ethics and on students' ethical behavior. Business faculty, in contrast, has attracted much less attention. This paper explores the context and the implications of an alleged case of plagiarism in a master's dissertation submitted to a university lacking both an ethical code of conduct and a formalized procedure to deal with (...)
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  36. Branding the Business School : Considerations and Concerns.Denise T. Smart & Debbie Thorne McAlister - 2005 - In Sheb L. True, Linda Ferrell & O. C. Ferrell (eds.), Fulfilling Our Obligation: Perspectives on Teaching Business Ethics. Kennesaw State University.
     
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  37.  55
    A Longitudinal Survey of Business School Graduates' Assessments of Business Ethics.Peter Arlow & Thomas A. Ulrich - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (4):295 - 302.
    A longitudinal survey of business graduates over a four-year period revealed stability over time in their assessments of proposals to improve business ethics except for significantly greater disapproval of government regulation. A comparison of graduates and executives indicate both favor developing general ethical business principles, business ethics courses, and codes of ethics, while disapproving government regulation and participation by religious leaders in ethical norms for business. The mean rankings by business graduates over time of (...)
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  38.  61
    Research Ethics in a Business School Context: The Establishment of a Review Committee and the Primary Issues of Concern. [REVIEW]Michelle Cunningham - 2010 - Journal of Academic Ethics 8 (1):43-66.
    This paper describes the establishment of and the issues experienced by the Research Ethics Committee (REC) of a Business School within a University in Ireland. It identifies the issue of voluntarily given informed consent as a key challenge for RECs operating in a Business School context. The paper argues that whilst the typology of ethical issues in business research are similar to the wider social sciences, the fact that much research is carried out in the (...)
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  39.  36
    Building Trust in Business Schools Through Ethical Governance.Ranjan Karri, Cam Caldwell, Elena P. Antonacopoulou & Daniel C. Naegle - 2005 - Journal of Academic Ethics 3 (2-4):159-182.
    This paper presents conceptual arguments to suggest that trust within organizations and trustworthiness of organizations are built through ethical governance mechanisms. We ground our analysis of trust, trustworthiness, and stewardship in the business literature and provide the context of business school governance as the focus of our paper. We present a framework that highlights the importance of knowledge, resources, performance focus, transparency, authentic caring, social capital and citizenship expectations in creating a basis for the ethical governance of (...)
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  40.  33
    Integrating Ethics Into the Business School Curriculum.Thomas W. Dunfee & Diana C. Robertson - 1988 - Journal of Business Ethics 7 (11):847 - 859.
    A project on teaching business ethics at The Wharton School concluded that ethics should be directly incorporated into key MBA courses and taught by the core business faculty. The project team, comprised of students, ethics faculty and functional business faculty, designed a model program for integrating ethics. The project was funded by the Exxon Education Foundation.The program originates with a general introduction designed to familiarize students with literature and concepts pertaining to professional and business ethics (...)
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  41.  33
    The Role of Business Schools in Managing the Incongruence Between Doing What is Right and Doing What It Takes to Get Ahead.Robert H. Schwartz, Sami Kassem & Dean Ludwig - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (6):465 - 469.
    This paper accepts as given that business students want to get ahead. It criticizes business schools for their failure to reduce the incongruence between doing what is right and doing what it takes to get ahead. Because of this failure business school graduates carry negative ideas, attitudes and behaviors vis-à-vis social responsibility from business schools into the business world. Recommendations are made for increasing the social responsibility of business schools.
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  42.  23
    Put an Ethicist on the Team!: A Promising But Neglected “Third Way” to Teach Ethics in a Business School.Wayne Norman - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (2):257-273.
    How can business schools best prepare their students to deal with the ethical challenges they will face in the ‘real world’? For three or four decades members of business schools have debated the relative merits of teaching ethics in a stand-alone “foundational” course or teaching a little bit of ethics “across the curriculum” in every course. This paper explores a third option—having an ethicist as a member of a team that teaches an integrated approach to management—which combines the (...)
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  43.  22
    Fish Starts to Rot From Head: The Role of Business School Deans in Curriculum Planning for Ethics.D. Vidaver-Cohen - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 1 (2):213-238.
    This article examines the role of the business school Dean in curriculum planning for ethics. First it explores why Deans must take the lead to introduce required professional responsibility courses in the business curriculum. Next it addresses how Deans can exercise both formal and informal authority to accomplish this task Finally, the article concludes with ways Deans can further promote the ethics message—both within and outside their institutions.
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  44.  3
    How to Succeed in Business School Leadership by Really Trying.Allan Bolton - 1997 - Perspectives: Policy and Practice in Higher Education 1 (2):62-65.
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  45.  9
    Walking Our Talk: Business Schools, Legitimacy, and Citizenship.Mary-Ellen Boyle - 2004 - Business and Society 43 (1):37-68.
  46.  18
    Enhancing Ethics Education at an Australian University: Griffith Business School’s Ethics Education (GBSEE) Project.Arthur Shacklock - 2007 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 18:545-550.
    This paper reports on a project which examined current ethics education content at Griffith Business School and proposed a way forward for GBS to enhance itsethics education contribution. In so doing, the project also reported on likely elements of best practice and associated issues for consideration by any University seeking to enhance its ethics education. An abbreviated version of the literature review carried out to substantiate the recommended options is also included in this paper.
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  47.  30
    Practicing What We Teach – Ethical Considerations for Business Schools.Cam Caldwell, Ranjan Karri & Thomas Matula - 2005 - Journal of Academic Ethics 3 (1):1-25.
    The raging cynicism felt toward businesses and business leaders is a by-product of perceived violations in the social contracts owed to the public. Business schools have a unique opportunity to make a significant impact on present and future business leaders, but ‘practicing what we teach’ is a critical condition precedent. This paper presents frameworks for ethical practices for assessing the social contracts owed by business schools in their role as citizens in the larger community. We identify (...)
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  48.  54
    An Analysis of Corporate Social Responsibility, Corporate Identity and Ethics Teaching in Business Schools.Nelarine Cornelius, James Wallace & Rana Tassabehji - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 76 (1):117-135.
    Recent events have raised concerns about the ethical standards of public and private organisations, with some attention falling on business schools as providers of education and training to managers and senior executives. This paper investigates the nature of, motivation and commitment to, ethics tuition provided by the business schools. Using content analysis of their institutional and home websites, we appraise their corporate identity, level of engagement in socially responsible programmes, degree of social inclusion, and the relationship to their (...)
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  49.  2
    Efficiency Measures for Sustainability Within a Business Schools’ Context.Wim Lambrechts, Luc Van Liedekerke, Sara Rymenams & Anne De Cort - unknown
    One of the essential parts within the transition towards sustainable economies, is the way how higher education prepares its students for their future role in business. In order for them to contribute to corporate social responsibility within the enterprise context, they need specific skills and competences related to sustainable development. Derived from the societal role of business schools in preparing the future business leaders and entrepreneurs, the focus of this paper is the participation in, and the contribution (...)
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  50. If MacIntyre Ran a Business School… How Practical Wisdom Can Be Developed in Management Education.Alejo José G. Sison & Dulce M. Redín - forthcoming - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility.
    Business Ethics, the Environment &Responsibility, EarlyView.
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