12 found
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  1.  23
    Unsustainable Growth, Hyper-Competition, and Worth in Life Science Research: Narrowing Evaluative Repertoires in Doctoral and Postdoctoral Scientists’ Work and Lives.Maximilian Fochler, Ulrike Felt & Ruth Müller - 2016 - Minerva 54 (2):175-200.
    There is a crisis of valuation practices in the current academic life sciences, triggered by unsustainable growth and “hyper-competition.” Quantitative metrics in evaluating researchers are seen as replacing deeper considerations of the quality and novelty of work, as well as substantive care for the societal implications of research. Junior researchers are frequently mentioned as those most strongly affected by these dynamics. However, their own perceptions of these issues are much less frequently considered. This paper aims at contributing to a better (...)
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  2. Machineries for Making Publics: Inscribing and De-Scribing Publics in Public Engagement.Ulrike Felt & Maximilian Fochler - 2010 - Minerva 48 (3):219-238.
    This paper investigates the dynamic and performative construction of publics in public engagement exercises. In this investigation, we, on the one hand, analyse how public engagement settings as political machineries frame particular kinds of roles and identities for the participating publics in relation to ‘the public at large’. On the other hand, we study how the participating citizens appropriate, resist and transform these roles and identities, and how they construct themselves and the participating group in relation to wider publics. The (...)
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  3.  8
    Negotiating the Reuse of Health-Data: Research, Big Data, and the European General Data Protection Regulation.Ulrike Felt & Johannes Starkbaum - 2019 - Big Data and Society 6 (2).
    Before the EU General Data Protection Regulation entered into force in May 2018, we witnessed an intense struggle of actors associated with data-dependent fields of science, in particular health-related academia and biobanks striving for legal derogations for data reuse in research. These actors engaged in a similar line of argument and formed issue alliances to pool their collective power. Using descriptive coding followed by an interpretive analysis, this article investigates the argumentative repertoire of these actors and embeds the analysis in (...)
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  4.  4
    Transdisciplinary Sustainability Research in Practice: Between Imaginaries of Collective Experimentation and Entrenched Academic Value Orders.Thomas Völker, Andrea Schikowitz, Judith Igelsböck & Ulrike Felt - 2016 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 41 (4):732-761.
    Over the past decades, we have witnessed calls for greater transdisciplinary engagement between scientific and societal actors to develop more robust answers to complex societal challenges. Although there seems to be agreement that these approaches might nurture innovations of a new kind, we know little regarding the research practices, their potential, and the limitations. To fill this gap, this article investigates a funding scheme in the area of transdisciplinary sustainability research. It offers a detailed analysis of the imaginaries and expectations (...)
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  5.  3
    Challenging Diversity: Steering Effects of Buzzwords in Projectified Health Care.Ulrike Felt, Kay Felder & Michael Penkler - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (1):138-163.
    This article discusses the effects of two trends in contemporary biomedicine that have so far been largely addressed separately: the steering of fields through programmatic “buzzwords” and the projectified nature of contemporary health research, care, and promotion. Drawing on a case study of an Austrian diversity-sensitive health promotion project related to obesity prevention, we show how the articulation of these trends—governance by buzzwords and projectification—often leads to not unproblematic and often paradoxical outcomes. Buzzwords such as “diversity” become especially important in (...)
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  6.  3
    “I Am Primarily Paid for Publishing…”: The Narrative Framing of Societal Responsibilities in Academic Life Science Research.Lisa Sigl, Ulrike Felt & Maximilian Fochler - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (3):1569-1593.
    Building on group discussions and interviews with life science researchers in Austria, this paper analyses the narratives that researchers use in describing what they feel responsible for, with a particular focus on how they perceive the societal responsibilities of their research. Our analysis shows that the core narratives used by the life scientists participating in this study continue to be informed by the linear model of innovation. This makes it challenging for more complex innovation models [such as responsible research and (...)
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  7.  3
    Coming to Terms with Biomedical Technologies in Different Technopolitical Cultures: A Comparative Analysis of Focus Groups on Organ Transplantation and Genetic Testing in Austria, France, and the Netherlands.Peter Winkler, Maximilian Fochler & Ulrike Felt - 2010 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 35 (4):525-553.
    In this comparative analysis of twelve focus groups conducted in Austria, France, and the Netherlands, we investigate how lay people come to terms with two biomedical technologies. Using the term ‘‘technopolitical culture,’’ we aim to show that the ways in which technosciences are interwoven with a specific society frame how citizens build their individual and collective positions toward them. We investigate how the focus group participants conceptualized organ transplantation and genetic testing, their perceptions of individual agency in relation to the (...)
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  8. Transitions, Expansions, Engagements: Science, Technology, & Human Values Between 2002 and 2007.Ulrike Felt - 2022 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 47 (4):650-655.
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  9.  11
    Reordering the “World of Things”: The Sociotechnical Imaginary of RFID Tagging and New Geographies of Responsibility.Ulrike Felt & Susanne Öchsner - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (5):1425-1446.
    The aim of this study is to investigate radio frequency identification tagging as a form of sociotechnical experimentation and the kinds of sociotechnical futures at stake in this experimentation. For this purpose, a detailed analysis of a publicly available promotional video by a tag producer for the fashion industry, a sector widely using RFID tags, was analysed in detail. The results of the study indicated that the sociotechnical imaginary of RFID tagging gravitates around the core value of perfect sociotechnical efficiency. (...)
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  10.  1
    Striking Gold in the 1990s: The Discovery of High-Temperature Superconductivity and Its Impact on the Science System.Helga Nowotny & Ulrike Felt - 1992 - Science, Technology and Human Values 17 (4):506-531.
    The article retraces the social and institutional circumstances that in 1986 led two researchers at the IBM laboratory near Zurich, Müller and Bednorz, to discover high-temperature superconductivity. After confirmation of the unexpected breakthrough an unprecedented mobilization of research groups all over the world took place while simul taneously high-temperature superconductivity turned into a subject of intense media interest. The authors discuss these events under three perspectives: the closer interlinkage capacity of researchers and the relationship between the social organization of research (...)
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  11.  23
    Bettina Heintz: Die Herrschaft der Regel. Zur Grundlagengeschichte des Computers.Mona Singer & Ulrike Felt - 1994 - Die Philosophin 5 (9):105-109.
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  12.  1
    RESPONSE_ABILITY A Card-Based Engagement Method to Support Researchers’ Ability to Respond to Integrity Issues.Florentine Frantz & Ulrike Felt - 2022 - Science and Engineering Ethics 28 (2):1-24.
    Issues related to research integrity receive increasing attention in policy discourse and beyond with most universities having introduced by now courses addressing issues of good scientific practice. While communicating expectations and regulations related to good scientific practice is essential, criticism has been raised that integrity courses do not sufficiently address discipline and career-stage specific dimensions, and often do not open up spaces for in-depth engagement. In this article, we present the card-based engagement method RESPONSE_ABILITY, which aims at supporting researchers in (...)
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