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  1.  28
    Bridging Diverging Perspectives and Repairing Damaged Relationships in the Aftermath of Workplace Transgressions.Tyler G. Okimoto & Michael Wenzel - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (3):443-473.
    ABSTRACT:Workplace transgressions elicit a variety of opinions about their meaning and what is required to address them. This diversity in views makes it difficult for managers to identify a mutually satisfactory response and to enable repair of the relationships between the affected parties. We develop a conceptual model for understanding how to bridge these diverging perspectives and foster relationship repair. Specifically, we argue that effective relationship repair is dependent on the parties’ reciprocal concern for others’ viewpoints and collective engagement in (...)
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  2.  11
    Back Into the Fold in Advance.Dena M. Gromet & Tyler G. Okimoto - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (3):411-441.
    ABSTRACT:After a transgression has occurred within an organization, a primary concern is the reintegration of the affected parties back into the organizational community. However, beyond offenders and victims, reintegration depends on the views of organizational peers and their desire to interact with these parties. In two studies, we demonstrated that offender amends and victim forgiveness interact to predict peer reintegrative outcomes. We found evidence of backlash against unforgiving victims: Peers wanted to work the least with victims who rejected appropriate amends, (...)
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    Back Into the Fold: The Influence of Offender Amends and Victim Forgiveness on Peer Reintegration.Dena M. Gromet & Tyler G. Okimoto - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (3):411-441.
    After a transgression has occurred within an organization, a primary concern is the reintegration of the affected parties back into the organizational community. However, beyond offenders and victims, reintegration depends on the views of organizational peers and their desire to interact with these parties. In two studies, we demonstrated that offender amends and victim forgiveness interact to predict peer reintegrative outcomes. We found evidence of backlash against unforgiving victims: Peers wanted to work the least with victims who rejected appropriate amends, (...)
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  4.  7
    Prosocial Consequences of Third-Party Anger.Janne van Doorn, Marcel Zeelenberg, Seger M. Breugelmans, Sebastian Berger & Tyler G. Okimoto - 2018 - Theory and Decision 84 (4):585-599.
    Anger has traditionally been associated with aggression and antagonistic behavior. A series of studies revealed that experiences of third-party anger can also lead to prosocial behavior. More specifically, three studies, hypothetical scenarios as well as a behavioral study, revealed that third-party anger can promote compensation of the victim. The results also showed a preference for such prosocial behaviors over antagonistic behaviors. We conclude that behaviors stemming from anger, whether antagonistic or prosocial, are reactions to inequity, albeit determined by the constraints (...)
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