7 found
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  1.  6
    Resource Crafting: Is It Really ‘Resource’ Crafting—Or Just Crafting?Qiao Hu, Wilmar B. Schaufeli, Toon W. Taris, Akihito Shimazu & Maureen F. Dollard - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  2.  36
    Passing on the Faith: How Mother‐Child Communication Influences Transmission of Moral Values.Toon W. Taris & Gun R. Semin - 1997 - Journal of Moral Education 26 (2):211-221.
    Abstract This paper examines religious affiliation and commitment of teenagers as a function of the quality of mother?child interaction and the mothers? religious commitment, as an illustration of the principle that transmission of parental norms and values to their children is facilitated or inhibited by the quality of their interaction. We expected that in cases where mother?child interaction was good, parents would be better able to impose their own values upon their children, resulting in a lower disaffiliation and higher religious (...)
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  3. A Career Crafting Training Program: Results of an Intervention Study.Evelien H. van Leeuwen, Toon W. Taris, Machteld van den Heuvel, Eva Knies, Elizabeth L. J. van Rensen & Jan-Willem J. Lammers - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    This intervention study examined the effects of a career crafting training on physicians' perceptions of their job crafting behaviors, career self-management, and employability. A total of 154 physicians working in two hospitals in a large Dutch city were randomly assigned to a waitlist control group or an intervention group. Physicians in the intervention group received an accredited training on career crafting, including a mix of theory, self-reflection, and exercises. Participants developed four career crafting goals during the training, to work on (...)
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  4.  36
    Worktime Demands and Work-Family Interference: Does Worktime Control Buffer the Adverse Effects of High Demands? [REVIEW]Sabine A. E. Geurts, Debby G. J. Beckers, Toon W. Taris, Michiel A. J. Kompier & Peter G. W. Smulders - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):229 - 241.
    This study examined whether worktime control buffered the impact of worktime demands on work-family interference (WFI), using data from 2,377 workers from various sectors of industry in The Netherlands. We distinguished among three types of worktime demands: time spent on work according to one's contract (contractual hours), the number of hours spent on overtime work (overtime hours), and the number of hours spent on commuting (commuting hours). Regarding worktime control, a distinction was made between having control over days off and (...)
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  5.  4
    Going Your Own Way: A Cross-Cultural Validation of the Motivational Demands at Work Scale.Toon W. Taris & Qiao Hu - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  6.  3
    The Motivational Make-Up of Workaholism and Work Engagement: A Longitudinal Study on Need Satisfaction, Motivation, and Heavy Work Investment.Toon W. Taris, Ilona van Beek & Wilmar B. Schaufeli - 2020 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
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  7.  3
    Differentiating Between Gift Giving and Bribing in China: A Guanxi Perspective.Peikai Li, Jian-Min Sun & Toon W. Taris - 2022 - Ethics and Behavior 32 (4):307-325.
    ABSTRACT Although scholars have long been interested in distinguishing gift giving from bribery, the impact of the degree of guanxi between a giver and a recipient on this distinction remains unclear. Drawing on a bystander perspective, this paper investigates how people distinguish between two types of giving behavior: gift giving and bribing. In three studies, we examined how guanxi, the price of a present, and the motivation for giving a present influence people’s perception of a present. The results largely supported (...)
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