Results for 'Toni A. Gregory'

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  1.  84
    An evolutionary theory of diversity: The contributions of grounded theory and grounded action to reconceptualizing and reframing diversity as a complex phenomenon.Toni A. Gregory - 2006 - World Futures 62 (7):542 – 550.
    The author discusses the contributions of grounded theory and grounded action to the development of a new, and evolutionary, theoretical framework for understanding diversity as a complex phenomenon. She discusses the work of Thomas and Gregory as pioneers in expanding the conceptualization of diversity, arguing that this new understanding increases the potential for creative action in systems.
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  2.  41
    Introduction.Toni A. Gregory & Michael A. Raffanti - 2006 - World Futures 62 (7):477 – 480.
    (2006). Introduction. World Futures: Vol. 62, No. 7, pp. 477-480.
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  3.  66
    COVID‐19 and Religious Ethics.Toni Alimi, Elizabeth L. Antus, Alda Balthrop-Lewis, James F. Childress, Shannon Dunn, Ronald M. Green, Eric Gregory, Jennifer A. Herdt, Willis Jenkins, M. Cathleen Kaveny, Vincent W. Lloyd, Ping-Cheung Lo, Jonathan Malesic, David Newheiser, Irene Oh & Aaron Stalnaker - 2020 - Journal of Religious Ethics 48 (3):349-387.
    The editors of the JRE solicited short essays on the COVID‐19 pandemic from a group of scholars of religious ethics that reflected on how the field might help them make sense of the complex religious, cultural, ethical, and political implications of the pandemic, and on how the pandemic might shape the future of religious ethics.
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  4.  30
    Testing conscientious objection by the norm of medicine.Toni C. Saad & Gregory Jackson - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (1):9-16.
    Debate persists over the place of conscience in medicine. Some argue for the complete exclusion of conscientious objection, while others claim an absolute right of refusal. This paper proposes that claims of conscientious objection can and should be permitted if they concern kinds of actions which fall outside of the normative standard of medicine, which is the pursuit of health. Medical practice which meets this criterion we call medicine qua medicine. If conscientious refusal concerns something consonant with the health-restoring aims (...)
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  5.  13
    Ethics, Literature, and Theory: An Introductory Reader.Wayne C. Booth, Dudley Barlow, Orson Scott Card, Anthony Cunningham, John Gardner, Marshall Gregory, John J. Han, Jack Harrell, Richard E. Hart, Barbara A. Heavilin, Marianne Jennings, Charles Johnson, Bernard Malamud, Toni Morrison, Georgia A. Newman, Joyce Carol Oates, Jay Parini, David Parker, James Phelan, Richard A. Posner, Mary R. Reichardt, Nina Rosenstand, Stephen L. Tanner, John Updike, John H. Wallace, Abraham B. Yehoshua & Bruce Young (eds.) - 2005 - Sheed & Ward.
    Do the rich descriptions and narrative shapings of literature provide a valuable resource for readers, writers, philosophers, and everyday people to imagine and confront the ultimate questions of life? Do the human activities of storytelling and complex moral decision-making have a deep connection? What are the moral responsibilities of the artist, critic, and reader? What can religious perspectives—from Catholic to Protestant to Mormon—contribute to literary criticism? Thirty well known contributors reflect on these questions, including iterary theorists Marshall Gregory, James (...)
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  6. Compulsive Communism: A Reply to the Reply by Gregory Elliott and Peter Osborne.Tony Skillen - 1991 - Radical Philosophy 59.
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  7.  59
    Toni Rønnow-Rasmussen, The Value Gap(Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2022), pp. xv + 215. [REVIEW]Alex Gregory - 2024 - Utilitas 36 (2).
    Rønnow-Rasmussen’s book explores the distinction between two kinds of value: good, and good-for. Rønnow-Rasmussen provides a reductive theory of both kinds of goodness: a fitting attitude account of goodness, on which facts about value reduce to facts about the norms governing agents’ attitudes. But Rønnow-Rasmussen argues that they conflict in an especially sharp way, so that we have a kind of choice about which to prioritise, and no obvious grounds on which to choose one over the other. I articulate some (...)
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  8.  8
    Real-life Bioethics.Gregory E. Kaebnick - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (6):2-2.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Real-life BioethicsGregory E. KaebnickMy academic training is in philosophy, and I tend to see the problems in bioethics as philosophical problems. And so they often are. What are moral values? What is the nature of rationality? These are certainly philosophical problems. But at the same time, they are not strictly philosophical problems, insofar as they are not the special purview of the field of philosophy. They require a broader (...)
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  9.  19
    Chunks, bindings, STAR, and holographic reduced representations.Tony A. Plate - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):844-845.
    Much of Halford et al.'s discussion of vector models for representing relations concerns the perceived inadequacies of alternative methods with respect to chunking, binding, systematicity, and resource requirements. Vector-based models for storing relations are in their infancy, however, and the relative merits of different schemes are not so clearly in favor of their STAR scheme as Halford et al. portray.
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  10. Convolution‐Based Memory Models.Tony A. Plate - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
     
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  11.  22
    Flamers, Flaunting and Permissible Persecution: R.G. v. Secretary of State for the Home Department [2006] E.W.C.A. Civ. 57.Toni A. M. Johnson - 2007 - Feminist Legal Studies 15 (1):99-111.
    This note analyses a recent case of the English Court of Appeal in which the applicant, R.G., a gay, H.I.V. positive Colombian claimed asylum on grounds of persecution due to his sexuality. Both the Asylum and Immigration Tribunal and the Court of Appeal rejected R.G.’s claim for asylum. The Court of Appeal’s first and most significant reason was that the alleged persecution was not sufficiently serious or life threatening, since R.G. had not suffered actual physical violence throughout the 13 years (...)
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  12.  17
    Quality of care in evaluating the doctor-patient relationship.Toni A. Nicoletti - 2006 - American Journal of Bioethics 6 (1):44 – 45.
  13.  20
    Reading the Stranger of Asylum Law: Legacies of Communication and Ethics. [REVIEW]Toni A. M. Johnson - 2013 - Feminist Legal Studies 21 (2):119-139.
  14.  42
    Protein transport into peroxisomes: Knowns and unknowns.Tânia Francisco, Tony A. Rodrigues, Ana F. Dias, Aurora Barros-Barbosa, Diana Bicho & Jorge E. Azevedo - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (10):1700047.
    Peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and rapidly transported into the organelle by a complex machinery. The data gathered in recent years suggest that this machinery operates through a syringe-like mechanism, in which the shuttling receptor PEX5 − the “plunger” − pushes a newly synthesized protein all the way through a peroxisomal transmembrane protein complex − the “barrel” − into the matrix of the organelle. Notably, insertion of cargo-loaded receptor into the “barrel” is an ATP-independent process, whereas extraction (...)
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  15. Strength of early visual adaptation depends on visual awareness.Randolph Blake, Duje Tadin, Kenith V. Sobel, Tony A. Raissian & Sang Chul Chong - 2006 - Pnas Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 103 (12):4783-4788.
  16.  12
    DNA damage and cell cycle regulation of ribonucleotide reductase.Stephen J. Elledge, Zheng Zhou, James B. Allen & Tony A. Navas - 1993 - Bioessays 15 (5):333-339.
    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) catalyzes the rate limiting step in the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. In addition to the well documented allosteric regulation, the synthesis of the enzyme is also tightly regulated at the level of transcription. mRNAs for both subunits are cell cycle regulated and inducible by DNA damage in all organisms examined, including E. coli, S. cerevisiae and H. sapiens. This DNA damage regulation is thought to provide a metabolic state that facilitates DNA replicational repair processes. (...)
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  17. ffytche, DH (2002). Neural codes forconsciousvision. Trends inCognitiveScience, 6, 493–495. ffytche, DH, Guy, CN, & Zeki, S.(1995). The parallel visual motion inputs into areas V1 and V5 of human cerebral cortex. Brain, 118, 1375–1394. ffytche, DH, Howard, RJ, Brammer, MJ, David, A., Woodruff, P., & Williams, S.(1998). The anatomy of conscious vision: an fMRI study of visual halluci. [REVIEW]J. A. Nunn & L. J. Gregory - 2005 - In Robertson, C. L. & N. Sagiv (eds.), Synesthesia: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. pp. 57--144.
     
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  18.  21
    An abstract, argumentation-theoretic approach to default reasoning.A. Bondarenko, P. M. Dung, R. A. Kowalski & F. Toni - 1997 - Artificial Intelligence 93 (1-2):63-101.
  19. Socrates, ironist and moral philosopher.Gregory Vlastos - 1991 - Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press.
    Putnam discusses each of the fifteen odes found in the book, studying the work both as a whole and as a series of interactive units.
  20.  10
    The Core Model.A. Dodd, R. Jensen, Tony Dodd, Ronald Jensen, A. J. Dodd & R. B. Jensen - 1984 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 49 (2):660-662.
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  21. The philosophy of Socrates: a collection of critical essays.Gregory Vlastos - 1980 - Notre Dame, Ind.: University of Notre Dame Press.
    Vlastos, G. Introduction: the paradox of Socrates.--Lacey, A. R. Our knowledge of Socrates.--Dover, K. J. Socrates in the Clouds.--Robinson, R. Elenchus.--Robinson, R. Elenchus, direct and indirect.--Robinson, R. Socratic definition.--Nakhnikian, G. Elenctic definitions.--Cohen, S. M. Socrates on the definition of piety: Euthyphro 10A-11B.--Santas, G. Socrates at work on virtue and knowledge in Plato's Laches.--Burnyeat, M. F. Virtues in action.--Walsh, J. J. The Socratic denial of Akrasia.--Santas, G. Plato's Protagoras and explanations of weakness.--Woozley, A. D. Socrates on disobeying the law.--Allen, R. E. (...)
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  22. Pure Hypocrisy.Tony Lynch & A. R. J. Fisher - 2012 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 19 (1):32-43.
    We argue that two main accounts of hypocrisy— the deception-based and the moral-non-seriousness-based account—fail to capture a specific kind of hypocrite who is morally serious and sincere "all the way down." The kind of hypocrisy exemplified by this hypocrite is irreducible to deception, self-deception or a lack of moral seriousness. We call this elusive and peculiar kind of hypocrisy, pure hypocrisy. We articulate the characteristics of pure hypocrisy and describe the moral psychology of two kinds of pure hypocrites.
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  23.  74
    Cognitive appraisals and emotional experience: Further evidence.A. S. R. Manstead, Philip E. Tetlock & Tony Manstead - 1989 - Cognition and Emotion 3 (3):225-239.
  24.  14
    The Evolution of Human Vocal Emotion.Gregory A. Bryant - 2020 - Emotion Review 13 (1):25-33.
    Vocal affect is a subcomponent of emotion programs that coordinate a variety of physiological and psychological systems. Emotional vocalizations comprise a suite of vocal behaviors shaped by evolution to solve adaptive social communication problems. The acoustic forms of vocal emotions are often explicable with reference to the communicative functions they serve. An adaptationist approach to vocal emotions requires that we distinguish between evolved signals and byproduct cues, and understand vocal affect as a collection of multiple strategic communicative systems subject to (...)
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  25.  17
    Childhood abuse and vulnerability to depression: Cognitive scars in otherwise healthy young adults.Tony T. Wells, W. Michael Vanderlind, Edward A. Selby & Christopher G. Beevers - 2014 - Cognition and Emotion 28 (5):821-833.
  26.  79
    The good mercenary?Tony Lynch & A. J. Walsh - 2000 - Journal of Political Philosophy 8 (2):133–153.
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  27.  51
    The problem of volition.Gregory A. Kimble & Lawrence C. Perlmuter - 1970 - Psychological Review 77 (5):361-84.
  28. Successful Psychopaths: Are They Unethical Decision-Makers and Why?Gregory W. Stevens, Jacqueline K. Deuling & Achilles A. Armenakis - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (2):139-149.
    Successful psychopaths, defined as individuals in the general population who nevertheless possess some degree of psychopathic traits, are receiving increasing amounts of empirical attention. To date, little is known about such individuals, specifically with regard to how they respond to ethical dilemmas in business contexts. This study investigated this relationship, proposing a mediated model in which the positive relationship between psychopathy and unethical decision-making is explained through the process of moral disengagement, defined as a cognitive orientation that facilitates unethical choice. (...)
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  29.  18
    Do Americans Have a Preference for Rule‐Based Classification?Gregory L. Murphy, David A. Bosch & ShinWoo Kim - 2017 - Cognitive Science:2026-2052.
    Six experiments investigated variables predicted to influence subjects’ tendency to classify items by a single property instead of overall similarity, following the paradigm of Norenzayan et al., who found that European Americans tended to give more “logical” rule-based responses. However, in five experiments with Mechanical Turk subjects and undergraduates at an American university, we found a consistent preference for similarity-based responding. A sixth experiment with Korean undergraduates revealed an effect of instructions, also reported by Norenzayan et al., in which classification (...)
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  30.  15
    The Oxford Practice Skills Course: Ethics, Law, and Communication Skills in Health Care Education.Tony Hope, R. A. Hope, Kenneth William Musgrave Fulford & Anne Yates - 1996 - Oxford University Press on Demand.
    Ethics, communication skills, and the law ('practice skills') are important in all aspects of modern health care. Doctors and nurses must be sensitive to the ethical aspects of their work and understand the legal framework within which clinical decisions are made. Well developed skills of communication, with patients, their relatives and other members of the clinical team, are a key feature of good clinical practice Until recently, the important of practice skills has been relatively neglected in health care education. This (...)
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  31.  5
    Rethinking Ibn ʻArabi.Gregory A. Lipton - 2018 - New York, NY, United States of America: Oxford University Press.
    The thirteenth century mystic Ibn ʻArabi was the foremost Sufi theorist of the premodern era. For more than a century, Western scholars and esotericists have heralded his universalism, arguing that he saw all contemporaneous religions as equally valid. In Rethinking Ibn ʻArabi, Gregory Lipton calls this image into question and throws into relief how Ibn ʻArabi's discourse is inseparably intertwined with the absolutist vision of his own religious milieu-- that is, the triumphant claim that Islam fulfilled, superseded, and therefore (...)
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  32.  49
    The Assembly of Geophysics: Scientific Disciplines as Frameworks of Consensus.Gregory A. Good - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 31 (3):259-292.
    What makes any investigative field a scientific discipline? This article argues that disciplines are ever-changing frameworks within which scientific activity is organised. Moreover, disciplinarity is not a yes or no proposition: scientific activities may achieve degrees of identity development. Degree of consensus is the key, and consensus on many questions (conceptual, methodological, institutional, and social) varies among sciences. Lastly, disciplinary development is non-teleological. Disciplines pass through no regular stages on their way from immature to mature status, designations articulated within the (...)
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  33.  37
    The Assembly of Geophysics: Scientific Disciplines as Frameworks of Consensus.Gregory A. Good - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 31 (3):259-292.
  34. Verbal irony in the wild.Gregory A. Bryant - 2011 - Pragmatics and Cognition 19 (2):291-309.
    Verbal irony constitutes a rough class of indirect intentional communication involving a complex interaction of language-specific and communication-general phenomena. Conversationalists use verbal irony in conjunction with paralinguistic signals such as speech prosody. Researchers examining acoustic features of speech communication usually focus on how prosodic information relates to the surface structure of utterances, and often ignore prosodic phenomena associated with implied meaning. In the case of verbal irony, there exists some debate concerning how these prosodic features manifest themselves in conversation. A (...)
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  35.  16
    Real closed rings II. model theory.Gregory Cherlin & Max A. Dickmann - 1983 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 25 (3):213-231.
  36.  9
    Between Data, Mathematical Analysis and Physical Theory: Research on Earth’s Magnetism in the 19th Century.Gregory A. Good - 2008 - Centaurus 50 (3):290-304.
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  37.  8
    Recognizing Verbal Irony in Spontaneous Speech.Gregory A. Bryant & Jean E. Fox Tree - 2002 - Metaphor and Symbol 17 (2):99-119.
    We explored the differential impact of auditory information and written contextual information on the recognition of verbal irony in spontaneous speech. Based on relevance theory, we predicted that speakers would provide acoustic disambiguation cues when speaking in situations that lack other sources of information, such as a visual channel. We further predicted that listeners would use this information, in addition to context, when interpreting the utterances. People were presented with spontaneously produced ironic and nonironic utterances from radio talk shows in (...)
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  38.  17
    Tales of a magnetic planet: Ronald T. Merrill: Our magnetic earth: The science of geomagnetism. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 2010, 272pp, $25.00 HB, $17.00 PB.Gregory A. Good - 2013 - Metascience 23 (2):327-329.
    This book joins a small number of efforts in the last decade to present the complex scientific issues of geomagnetism to a broader, semi-technical audience. The author approaches this goal more closely than most scientists and science writers. He specifically eschews mathematical equations knowing that even one equation leads some readers to give up trying. He offers instead a mix of description and story-telling, the former directed at phenomena and procedures, the latter drawn mostly from personal experience.As Merrill notes, his (...)
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  39.  5
    U.S. Coast Survey vs. Naval Hydrographic Office: A Nineteenth-Century Rivalry in Science and PoliticsThomas G. Manning.Gregory A. Good - 1989 - Isis 80 (3):537-538.
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  40. Toward a Non-Reductive Naturalism: Combining the Insights of Husserl and Dewey.Gregory A. Trotter - 2016 - William James Studies 12 (1):19-35.
    This paper examines the status of naturalism in the philosophies of Edmund Husserl and John Dewey. Despite the many points of overlap and agreement between Husserl’s and Dewey’s philosophical projects, there remains one glaring difference, namely, the place and status of naturalism in their approaches. For Husserl, naturalism is an enemy to be vanquished. For Dewey, naturalism is the only method that can put philosophy back in touch with the concerns of human beings. This paper will demonstrate the remarkable similarities (...)
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  41.  12
    Combating the ‘Safe’ Cigarette: Ethical, Public Health Issues and Regulatory Proposals.Tony J. Cutler & David A. Nye - 1999 - Health Care Analysis 7 (3):297-308.
    Regulatory authorities have advised smokers who would not or could not quit smoking to switch to lower tar cigarettes. Smoking such cigarettes was seen as a means of reducing the harm caused by smoking, but not as offering a ‘safe’ smoking option. Correspondingly manufacturers have been required to place tar and nicotine information on packet labels and/or advertisements. This paper explores the possibility that the conventional format for conveying tar and nicotine information could be responsible for the belief, held by (...)
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  42. Ghoshal’s Ghost: Financialization and the End of Management Theory.Gregory A. Daneke & Alexander Sager - 2015 - Philosophy of Management 14 (1):29-45.
    Sumantra Ghoshal’s condemnation of “bad management theories” that were “destroying good management practices” has not lost any of its salience, after a decade. Management theories anchored in agency theory (and neo-classical economics generally) continue to abet the financialization of society and undermine the functioning of business. An alternative approach (drawn from a more classic institutional, new ecological, and refocused ethical approaches) is reviewed.
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  43. Nik Software Captured: The Complete Guide to Using Nik Software's Photographic Tools.Tony L. Corbell & Joshua A. Haftel - 2011 - Wiley.
  44.  8
    Profesorsko kare.T︠s︡ocho Boi︠a︡dzhiev, Kalin I︠A︡nakiev, Georgi Kapriev, Vladimir Gradev & Toni Nikolov (eds.) - 2022 - Sofii︠a︡: Fondat︠s︡ii︠a︡ "Komunitas".
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  45.  43
    Individual differences in imagery and the psychophysiology of emotion.Gregory A. Miller, Daniel N. Levin, Michael J. Kozak, Edwin W. Cook, Alvin McLean & Peter J. Lang - 1987 - Cognition and Emotion 1 (4):367-390.
  46.  76
    Neo-Molinism and the Infinite Intelligence of God.Gregory A. Boyd - 2003 - Philosophia Christi 5 (1):187-204.
  47.  18
    Measuring the Inaccessible Earth: Geomagnetism, In situ Measurements, Remote Sensing, and Proxy Data.Gregory A. Good - 2011 - Centaurus 53 (2):176-189.
    The usual problems of measurement and its meaning are complicated and magnified when the object of study is in principle and in fact inaccessible. When a phenomenon occurs in a place where our instruments cannot reach, what can the relation between the instrument, its reading, and the phenomenon be? This essay asks how researchers have addressed questions about inaccessible processes of Earth's magnetic field on the surface, at the edge of space and under its surface. This case takes us beyond (...)
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  48. Spinoza's Necessitarianism Reconsidered.Gregory Walski & Edwin Curley - 1999 - In Rocco J. Gennaro & Charles Huenemann (eds.), New essays on the rationalists. New York: Oxford University Press.
    In this paper, we defend the view that Spinoza is committed to allowing for the existence of a plurality of possible worlds, that his necessitarianism is merely moderate, not strict enough to exclude the possibility of other worlds. To show that evidence for attributing strict necessitarianism to Spinoza is lacking, we shall concentrate on Don Garrett's article, “Spinoza's Necessitarianism,” in the conviction that his case for attributing strict necessitarianism to Spinoza is the strongest one available.
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  49.  14
    History of Geophysics. Volume II. C. Stewart Gillmor.Gregory A. Good - 1987 - Isis 78 (3):454-455.
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  50.  47
    Q & A.Tony Coady & C. A. J. Coady - 2009 - The Philosophers' Magazine 44 (44):114-115.
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