Results for 'Titimothy Chappell'

563 found
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  1.  73
    Colin McGinn, Ethics, Evil and Fiction, Oxford, Oxford University-Press, 1997, pp. viii + 186.Titimothy Chappell - 2002 - Utilitas 14 (2):258.
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  2.  5
    No Title available: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Titimothy Chappell - 2002 - Utilitas 14 (2):258-261.
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  3.  36
    Ethics Beyond the Limits: New Essays on Bernard Williams' Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy.Sophie Grace Chappell & Marcel van Ackeren (eds.) - 2018 - New York: Routledge.
    Bernard Williams' Ethics and the Limits of Philosophy is widely regarded as one of the most important works of moral philosophy in the last fifty years. In this outstanding collection of new essays, fourteen internationally-recognised philosophers examine the enduring contribution that Williams's book continues to make to ethics. Required.
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  4.  58
    A Common Humanity: Thinking about Love and Truth and Justice.Timothy Chappell - 2002 - Mind 111 (442):411-414.
  5.  36
    Hedonistic Utilitarianism.Timothy Chappell - 1998
    1 Department of Philosophy, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN. t.d.j.chappell@dundee.ac.uk.
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  6. Idealism Without God.Helen Yetter-Chappell - 2017 - In K. Pearce & T. Goldschmidt (eds.), Idealism: New Essays in Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
    I develop a nontheistic (quasi-)Berkeleyan idealism. The basic strategy is to peel away the attributes of God that aren't essential for role he plays in idealist metaphysics. God's omnibenevolence, his desires, intentions, beliefs, his very status as an agent ... aren't relevant to the work he does. When we peel all these things away, we're left with a view on which reality is a vast unity of consciousness, weaving together sensory experiences of colors, shapes, sounds, sizes, etc. into the trees, (...)
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  7. The Demands of Consequentialism.Timothy Chappell - 2002 - Mind 111 (444):891-897.
  8. The Problem of Moral Demandingness: New Philosophical Essays.Timothy Chappell (ed.) - 2009 - New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
    How much can morality demand of well-off Westerners as a response to the plight of the poor and starving in the rest of the world, or in response to environmental crises? Is it wrong to put your friends and family first? And what do the answers to these questions tell us about the nature of morality? This collection of eleven new essays from some of the world's leading moral philosophers brings the reader to the cutting edge of this contemporary ethical (...)
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  9. Mind-Body Meets Metaethics: A Moral Concept Strategy.Helen Yetter-Chappell & Richard Yetter Chappell - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (3):865-878.
    The aim of this paper is to assess the relationship between anti-physicalist arguments in the philosophy of mind and anti-naturalist arguments in metaethics, and to show how the literature on the mind-body problem can inform metaethics. Among the questions we will consider are: (1) whether a moral parallel of the knowledge argument can be constructed to create trouble for naturalists, (2) the relationship between such a "Moral Knowledge Argument" and the familiar Open Question Argument, and (3) how naturalists can respond (...)
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  10.  10
    An auto-associative neural network for sparse representations: Analysis and application to models of recognition and cued recall.Mark Chappell & Michael S. Humphreys - 1994 - Psychological Review 101 (1):103-128.
  11.  22
    Two distinctions that do make a difference.Chappell Timothy - 2002 - Philosophy 77 (2):211-233.
    The paper outlines and explores a possible strategy for defending both the action/omission distinction and the principle of double effect. The strategy is to argue that there are degrees of actionhood, and that we are in general less responsible for what has a lower degree of actionhood, because of that lower degree. Moreover, what we omit generally has a lower degree of actionhood than what we actively do, and what we do under known-but-not-intended descriptions generally has a lower degree of (...)
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  12. Seeing through eyes, mirrors, shadows and pictures.Helen Yetter-Chappell - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (8):2017-2042.
    I argue that we can see in a great many cases that run counter to common sense. We can literally see through mirrors, in just the same way that we see through our eyes. We can, likewise, literally see through photographs, shadows, and paintings. Rather than starting with an analysis of seeing, I present a series of evolving thought experiments, arguing that in each case there is no relevant difference between it and the previous case regarding whether we see. In (...)
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  13. The Virtues of Thrasymachus.Chappell - 1993 - Phronesis 38 (1):1 - 17.
    I deny that Thrasymachus' argument or position in Republic I is confused. He doesn't think that either justice or injustice is either a virtue or a vice. He thinks that justice is a DEvice.
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  14. Idealism and the Best of All (Subjectively Indistinguishable) Possible Worlds.Helen Yetter-Chappell - 2024 - In Uriah Kriegel (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Mind Vol 4. Oxford University Press.
    The space of possible worlds is vast. Some of these possible worlds are materialist worlds, some may be worlds bottoming out in 0s and 1s, or other strange things we cannot even dream of… and some are idealist worlds. From among all of the worlds subjectively indistinguishable from our own, the idealist ones have uniquely compelling virtues. Idealism gives us a world that is just as it appears; a world that’s fit to literally enter our minds when we perceive it. (...)
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  15. Dualism all the way down: why there is no paradox of phenomenal judgment.Helen Yetter-Chappell - 2022 - Synthese 200 (2):1-24.
    Epiphenomenalist dualists hold that certain physical states give rise to non-physical conscious experiences, but that these non-physical experiences are themselves causally inefficacious. Among the most pressing challenges facing epiphenomenalists is the so-called “paradox of phenomenal judgment”, which challenges epiphenomenalism’s ability to account for our knowledge of our own conscious experiences. According to this objection, we lack knowledge of the very thing that epiphenomenalists take physicalists to be unable to explain. By developing an epiphenomenalist theory of subjects and mental states, this (...)
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  16. Get Acquainted With Naïve Idealism.Helen Yetter-Chappell - forthcoming - In Robert French & Berit Brogaard (eds.), The Roles of Representations in Visual Perception. Springer.
    In this paper, I present a new realist idealist account of perception, on which perception is not essentially representational. Perception, rather, involves an overlapping of two phenomenal unities: the perceiving subject, and the phenomenal tapestry of reality. This renders it intelligible that we can stand in precisely the same relation to distal objects of perception as we do to our own pains. The resulting view captures much that naïve realists take to be central to perception. But, I argue, such a (...)
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  17. The Ethics of Deliberate Exposure to SARS-CoV-2 to Induce Immunity.Robert Streiffer, David Killoren & Richard Y. Chappell - 2021 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 38 (3):479-496.
    We explore the ethics of deliberately exposing consenting adults to SARS-CoV-2 to induce immunity to the virus (“DEI” for short). We explain what a responsible DEI program might look like. We explore a consequentialist argument for DEI according to which DEI is a viable harm-reduction strategy. Then we consider a non-consequentialist argument for DEI that draws on the moral significance of consent. Additionally, we consider arguments for the view that DEI is unethical on the grounds that, given that large-scale DEI (...)
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  18.  58
    Practical rationality for pluralists about the good.Chappell Timothy - 2003 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (2):161-177.
    I argue that if a normative theory of practical rationality is to represent an adequate and coherent response to a plurality of incommensurable goods, it cannot be a maximising theory. It will have to be a theory that recognises two responses to goods as morally licit – promotion and respect – and one as morally illicit – violation. This result has a number of interesting corollaries, some of which I indicate. Perhaps the most interesting is that it makes the existence (...)
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  19.  12
    Dreaming.V. C. Chappell - 1962 - Philosophical Quarterly 12 (47):178-185.
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  20.  49
    Idealization and Problem Intuitions: Why No Possible Agent is Indisputably Ideal.Helen Yetter-Chappell - 2019 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 26 (9-10):270-279.
    This paper explores one way in which the meta-problem may shed light on existing debates about the hard problem (though not directly on the hard problem itself). I'll argue that the possibility of a suitable agent without problem intuitions would undercut the dialectical force of arguments against physicalism. Standard antiphysicalist arguments begin from intuitions about what's ideally conceivable, and argue from there to the falsity of physicalism. For these arguments to be dialectically effective, there must be a shared conception of (...)
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  21.  25
    Aristotle and Augustine on freedom: two theories of freedom, voluntary action, and akrasia.Timothy D. J. Chappell - 1995 - New York: St. Martin's Press.
  22. Circularity in the conditional analysis of phenomenal concepts.Helen Yetter-Chappell - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (2):553-572.
    The conditional analysis of phenomenal concepts purports to give physicalists a way of understanding phenomenal concepts that will allow them to (1) accept the zombie intuition, (2) accept that conceivability is generally a good guide to possibility, and yet (3) reject the conclusion that zombies are metaphysically possible. It does this by positing that whether phenomenal concepts refer to physical or nonphysical states depends on what the actual world is like. In this paper, I offer support for the Chalmers/Alter objection (...)
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  23.  6
    Agamemnon at Aulis: On the Right and Wrong Sorts of Imaginative Identification.Sophie-Grace Chappell - 2024 - Topoi 43 (2):557-573.
    Williams’ discussion of dilemmas in his classic paper “Ethical consistency” famously focuses on an example that has not bothered commentators on and respondents to Williams as much as it should have bothered them: the example of Agamemnon in Aeschylus’ play. In this paper I try to pick apart what Williams wants to say from what is really going on in the text that he unfortunately chooses for his example. I compare with Williams’ discussion of Agamemnon four other commentators on this (...)
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  24.  57
    Absolutes and Particulars.Tim Chappell - 2004 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 54:95-117.
    [About the book] Although this collection of articles is not formally a commentary on Elizabeth Anscombe's famous article of the same title, in which she criticised the moral philosophy prevalent in 1958, a number of the contributors do take Anscombe's work as a starting point. Taken together the collection could be seen as a demonstration of the extent to which moral philosophers have since attempted to answer Anscombe's challenge, and to develop an approach to their subject which, while psychologically plausible, (...)
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  25.  92
    Liberty Worth the Name: Locke on Free Agency.Vere Chappell - 2004 - Mind 113 (450):420-424.
  26.  29
    The Cambridge Companion to Locke.Lisa J. Downing & Vere Chappell - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (1):120.
    The Cambridge Companion to Locke now joins the long list of titles available in this excellent series. As we have come to expect, the contributors to this Companion are distinguished and the result is comprehensive and eminently useful. This volume is one of the more accessible in the series, with most of the chapters pitched at a level accessible to advanced undergraduates and especially helpful to beginning graduate students. Many of the chapters will be of considerable interest to scholars; here (...)
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  27. Dissolving type‐b physicalism.Helen Yetter-Chappell - 2017 - Philosophical Perspectives 31 (1):469-498.
    The majority of physicalists are type-B physicalists – believing that the phenomenal-physical truths are only knowable a posteriori. This paper aims to show why this view is misguided. The strategy is to design an agent who (1) has full general physical knowledge, (2) has phenomenal concepts, and yet (3) is wired such that she would be in a position to immediately work out the phenomenal-physical truths. I argue that this derivation yields a priori knowledge. The possibility of such a creature (...)
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  28.  14
    Familiarity breeds differentiation: A subjective-likelihood approach to the effects of experience in recognition memory.James L. McClelland & Mark Chappell - 1998 - Psychological Review 105 (4):724-760.
  29.  33
    The Future-Person Standpoint.Timothy Chappell - 2014 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  30.  79
    J. J. Kupperman, Value … And What Follows, New York, OUP, 1999, pp. vi + 168.Timothy Chappell - 2001 - Utilitas 13 (3):373.
  31.  23
    Reason, Passion, and Action: The Third Condition of the Voluntary.T. D. J. Chappell - 1995 - Philosophy 70 (273):453 - 459.
    1. ‘Reason is and ought only to be the slave of the passions, and can pretend to no other office, but to serve and obey them.’ 2.3.3) Unfortunately, Hume uses ‘reason’ to mean ‘discovery of truth or falsehood‘ as well as discovery of logical relations. So suppose we avoid, as Hume I think does not, prejudging the question of how many ingredients are requisite for action, by separating these two claims out: A. Reason is and ought only to be the (...)
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  32.  80
    Reading the περιτροπή: "Theaetetus" 170c-171c.Chappell - 2006 - Phronesis 51 (2):109 - 139.
    Two readings of the much-discussed περιτροπή argument of "Theaetetus" 170c-171c have dominated the literature. One I call "the relativity reading". On this reading, the argument fails by ignoratio elenchi because it "carelessly" omits "the qualifications 'true for so-and-so' which [Protagoras'] theory insists on" (Bostock 1988: 90). The other reading I call "the many-worlds interpretation". On this view, Plato's argument succeeds in showing that "Protagoras' position becomes utterly self-contradictory" because "he claims that everyone lives in his own relativistic world, yet at (...)
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  33. What Does God Add to an Idealist World?Helen Yetter-Chappell - 2022 - In Kirk Lougheed (ed.), Value Beyond Monotheism: The Axiology of the Divine. New York: Routledge..
    There has been increasing interest among contemporary philosophers in nontheistic forms of ontological idealism, in contrast to the canonical theistic idealism of Berkeley. Given the ontological role that God plays in Berkeley’s metaphysics, it’s natural to think that questions of the value-impact of God will be greater in an idealistic context. Thus, it seems fruitful to ask: What does God add to (or detract from) an idealist world? This paper assesses the benefits and costs that come from moving to an (...)
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  34.  27
    Boss, Judith and James M. Nuzum.Judith Boss, Giordano Bruno, Vere Chappell, John Cottingham, Peter A. Danielson, Rene Descartes, John Finis, R. J. Hollingdale & Vittorio Hösle - 1999 - Teaching Philosophy 22 (2):237.
  35.  16
    Buddhist and Taoist Studies I.Michael R. Saso & David W. Chappell (eds.) - 1977 - University of Hawaii Press.
  36.  99
    Anthropocentrism and The Problem of Natural Evil: A Note.Timothy Chappell - 2002 - Ratio 14 (1):84-85.
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  37. Augustine's ethics.Timothy Chappell - unknown
  38.  18
    Aristotle and Augustine on voluntary action and freedom and weakness of the will.Timothy David John Chappell - 1992 - Dissertation, University of Edinburgh
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  39. Atheism and theism. J. J. C. Smart J. J. Haldane.Timothy Chappell - 2001 - Mind 110 (439):836-839.
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  40.  2
    Delphi And The Homeric Hymn To Apollo.Mike Chappell - 2006 - Classical Quarterly 56 (2):331-348.
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  41.  19
    Thomas Reid. [REVIEW]Vere Chappell - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (4):860-862.
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  42.  15
    Withdrawing from Life.Joachim Jung & Tim Chappell - 2003 - Philosophy Now 40:13-16.
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  43.  21
    Book Review:Retreat from Truth. G. R. G. Mure. [REVIEW]V. C. Chappell - 1959 - Ethics 70 (1):97-.
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  44.  50
    Book Review:Language, Thought, and Culture. Roger W. Brown, Irving M. Copi, Don E. Dulaney, William K. Frankena, Paul Henle, Charles L. Stevenson. [REVIEW]V. C. Chappell - 1959 - Ethics 70 (1):84-.
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  45. Editorial Note.Moira Gilruth, Sophie Grace Chappell & Franz Berto - 2021 - Philosophical Quarterly 71 (4):pqab049.
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  46.  10
    Review of Geoffrey Reginald Gilchrist Mure: Retreat From Truth[REVIEW]V. C. Chappell - 1959 - Ethics 70 (1):97-98.
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  47.  5
    Ethics.Piers Benn & T. D. J. Chappell - 1997 - Philosophical Quarterly 50 (200):410-412.
    In this engaged and engaging survey Piers Benn examines the major currents of ethical theory, concentrating on sound reasoning about morality. Benn's account offers a qualified defence of Aristotelian virtue theory, while bringing out what is distinctive and valuable in a broad range of approaches, such as those of Kant and the Utilitarians. His examples emphasize the ordinary choices of everyday life - gossip, friendship, honesty, sexual relations, work, and self-realization.
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  48.  11
    Human Values: New Essays on Ethics and Natural Law. 1st Edition.David Simon Oderberg & T. Chappell (eds.) - 2004 - New York: Palgrave-Macmillan.
    In recent decades, the revival of natural law theory in modern moral philosophy has been an exciting and important development. Human Values brings together an international group of moral philosophers who in various respects share the aims and ideals of natural law ethics. In their diverse ways, these authors make distinctive and original contributions to the continuing project of developing natural law ethics as a comprehensive treatment of modern ethical theory and practice.
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  49.  6
    Responsibility.Roger T. Ames, Thomas M. Chappell, M. David Eckel, Anna Lännström, Margaret R. Miles, Andrea Nightingale, Bhikhu Parekh, Steven C. Rockefeller, David Roochnik, Alfred I. Tauber & Michael Zank - 2007 - Lexington Books.
    In this book philosophers, scholars of religion, and activists address the theme of responsibility. Barbara Darling-Smith brings together an enlightening collection of essays that analyze the ethics of responsibility, its relational nature, and its global struggle.
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  50.  3
    Religion and rationality.Terence Penelhum & V. C. Chappell - 1971 - New York,: Random House.
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