Results for 'Timothy Sansbury'

989 found
Order:
  1.  97
    The false promise of quantum mechanics.Timothy Sansbury - 2007 - Zygon 42 (1):111-122.
    The causal indeterminacy suggested by quantum mechanics has led to its being the centerpiece of several proposals for divine action that does not contradict natural laws. However, even if the theoretical concerns about the reality of causal indeterminacy are ignored, quantum-level divine action fails to resolve the problem of ongoing, responsive divine activity. This is because most quantum-level actions require a significant period of time in order to reach macroscopic levels whether via chaotic amplification or complete divine control of quantum (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  2. More reflection on physics Carl S. helr1ch is there a basis for teleology in physics? Timothy sansbury the false promise of quantum mechanics issues in biomedicine and ethics Ann mllliken Pederson south dakota and abortion: A local story about.Cs Peirce & Stuart Kauffman - forthcoming - Zygon.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Modal Logic as Metaphysics.Timothy Williamson - 2013 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    Timothy Williamson gives an original and provocative treatment of deep metaphysical questions about existence, contingency, and change, using the latest resources of quantified modal logic. Contrary to the widespread assumption that logic and metaphysics are disjoint, he argues that modal logic provides a structural core for metaphysics.
  4. Vagueness.Timothy Williamson - 1996 - New York: Routledge.
    Vagueness provides the first comprehensive examination of a topic of increasing importance in metaphysics and the philosophy of logic and language. Timothy Williamson traces the history of this philosophical problem from discussions of the heap paradox in classical Greece to modern formal approaches such as fuzzy logic. He illustrates the problems with views which have taken the position that standard logic and formal semantics do not apply to vague language, and defends the controversial realistic view that vagueness is a (...)
  5. Law-Abiding Causal Decision Theory.Timothy Luke Williamson & Alexander Sandgren - 2023 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 74 (4):899-920.
    In this paper we discuss how Causal Decision Theory should be modified to handle a class of problematic cases involving deterministic laws. Causal Decision Theory, as it stands, is problematically biased against your endorsing deterministic propositions (for example it tells you to deny Newtonian physics, regardless of how confident you are of its truth). Our response is that this is not a problem for Causal Decision Theory per se, but arises because of the standard method for assessing the truth of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  6. Counterpossibles.Timothy Williamson - 2018 - Topoi 37 (3):357-368.
    The paper clarifies and defends the orthodox view that counterfactual conditionals with impossible antecedents are vacuously true against recent criticisms. It argues that apparent counterexamples to orthodoxy result from uncritical reliance on a fallible heuristic used in the processing of conditionals. A comparison is developed between such counterpossibles and vacuously true universal generalizations.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  7. The Philosophy of Philosophy.Timothy Williamson - 2007 - Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell.
    The second volume in the _Blackwell Brown Lectures in Philosophy_, this volume offers an original and provocative take on the nature and methodology of philosophy. Based on public lectures at Brown University, given by the pre-eminent philosopher, Timothy Williamson Rejects the ideology of the 'linguistic turn', the most distinctive trend of 20th century philosophy Explains the method of philosophy as a development from non-philosophical ways of thinking Suggests new ways of understanding what contemporary and past philosophers are doing.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   694 citations  
  8. Abductive Philosophy.Timothy Williamson - 2016 - Philosophical Forum 47 (3-4):263-280.
  9. Semantic Paradoxes and Abductive Methodology.Timothy Williamson - 2017 - In Reflections on the Liar. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 325-346.
    Understandably absorbed in technical details, discussion of the semantic paradoxes risks losing sight of broad methodological principles. This chapter sketches a general approach to the comparison of rival logics, and applies it to argue that revision of classical propositional logic has much higher costs than its proponents typically recognize.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   53 citations  
  10. Must do better.Timothy Williamson - 2006 - In Patrick Greenough & Michael P. Lynch (eds.), Truth and realism. Oxford University Press. pp. 278--92.
    Imagine a philosophy conference in Presocratic Greece. The hot question is: what are things made of? Followers of Thales say that everything is made of water, followers of Anaximenes that everything is made of air, and followers of Heraclitus that everything is made of fire. Nobody is quite clear what these claims mean, and some question whether the founders of the respective schools ever made them. But amongst the groupies there is a buzz about all the recent exciting progress. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  11. The Necessity and Determinacy of Distinctness.Timothy Williamson - 1996 - In David Wiggins, Sabina Lovibond & Stephen G. Williams (eds.), Essays for David Wiggins: identity, truth, and value. Cambridge: Blackwell. pp. 1-17.
  12. Modal Logic within Counterfactual Logic.Timothy Williamson - 2010 - In Bob Hale & Aviv Hoffmann (eds.), Modality: metaphysics, logic, and epistemology. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  13.  14
    Philosophical Criticisms of Experimental Philosophy.Timothy Williamson - 2016 - In Wesley Buckwalter & Justin Sytsma (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Malden, MA: Blackwell. pp. 22–36.
    The philosophical relevance of experimental psychology is hard to dispute. Much more controversial is the so‐called negative program's critique of armchair philosophical methodology, in particular the reliance on ‘intuitions’ about thought experiments. This chapter responds to that critique. It argues that, since the negative program has been forced to extend the category of intuition to ordinary judgments about real‐life cases, the critique is in immediate danger of generating into global scepticism, because all human judgments turn out to depend on intuitions. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  14.  31
    Widening the Picture.Timothy Williamson - 2007 - In The Philosophy of Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 312–405.
    This chapter aims to attempt no more than to make some informal and unsystematic remarks on the transformation of analytic philosophy. It deals with a few sketchy remarks on the historiography of recent analytic philosophy. Writing in 1981, David Lewis described “a reasonable goal for a philosopher” as bringing one’s opinions into stable equilibrium. A natural comparison is between Lewis’s Quinean or at least post‐Quinean methodology and the methodology of Peter Strawson, Quine’s leading opponent from the tradition of ordinary language (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  15. Moral Motivation.Timothy Schroeder, Adina L. Roskies & Shaun Nichols - 2010 - In John M. Doris (ed.), Moral Psychology Handbook. Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    In this chapter, we begin with a discussion of motivation itself, and use that discussion to sketch four possible theories of distinctively moral motivation: caricature versions of familiar instrumentalist, cognitivist, sentimentalist, and personalist theories about morally worthy motivation. To test these theories, we turn to a wealth of scientific, particularly neuroscientific, evidence. Our conclusions are that (1) although the scientific evidence does not at present mandate a unique philosophical conclusion, it does present formidable obstacles to a number of popular philosophical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  16. Vagueness in reality.Timothy Williamson - 2003 - In Michael J. Loux & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), The Oxford handbook of metaphysics. New York: Oxford University Press.
    When I take off my glasses, the world looks blurred. When I put them back on, it looks sharpedged. I do not think that the world really was blurred; I know that what changed was my relation to the distant physical objects ahead, not those objects themselves. I am more inclined to believe that the world really is and was sharp-edged. Is that belief any more reasonable than the belief that the world really is and was blurred? I see more (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  17. Cosmopolitan right, indigenous peoples, and the risks of cultural interaction.Timothy Waligore - 2009 - Public Reason 1 (1):27-56.
    Kant limits cosmopolitan right to a universal right of hospitality, condemning European imperial practices towards indigenous peoples, while allowing a right to visit foreign countries for the purpose of offering to engage in commerce. I argue that attempts by contemporary theorists such as Jeremy Waldron to expand and update Kant’s juridical category of cosmopolitan right would blunt or erase Kant’s own anti-colonial doctrine. Waldron’s use of Kant’s category of cosmopolitan right to criticize contemporary identity politics relies on premises that upset (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  18. Rawls, self-respect, and assurance: How past injustice changes what publicly counts as justice.Timothy Waligore - 2016 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 15 (1):42-66.
    This article adapts John Rawls’s writings, arguing that past injustice can change what we ought to publicly affirm as the standard of justice today. My approach differs from forward-looking approaches based on alleviating prospective disadvantage and backward-looking historical entitlement approaches. In different contexts, Rawls’s own concern for the ‘social bases of self-respect’ and equal citizenship may require public endorsement of different principles or specifications of the standard of justice. Rawls’s difference principle focuses on the least advantaged socioeconomic group. I argue (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  19. Vagueness, identity and Leibniz’s Law.Timothy Williamson - 2001 - In P. Giaretta, A. Bottani & M. Carrara (eds.), Individuals, Essence and Identity. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  20. E = K, but what about R?Timothy Williamson - 2019 - In Maria Lasonen-Aarnio & Clayton Littlejohn (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Evidence. Routledge.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  60
    Telling more than we can know: Verbal reports on mental processes.Richard E. Nisbett & Timothy D. Wilson - 1977 - Psychological Review; Psychological Review 84 (3):231.
  22. Putting inference to the best explanation in its place.Timothy Day & Harold Kincaid - 1994 - Synthese 98 (2):271-295.
    This paper discusses the nature and the status of inference to the best explanation. We outline the foundational role given IBE by its defenders and the arguments of critics who deny it any place at all ; argue that, on the two main conceptions of explanation, IBE cannot be a foundational inference rule ; sketch an account of IBE that makes it contextual and dependent on substantive empirical assumptions, much as simplicity seems to be ; show how that account avoids (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  23. Who Needs a Proof of the Principle of Non-Contradiction?Timothy Clarke - forthcoming - Mind.
    The topic of this paper is Aristotle’s ‘proof by refutation’ of the Principle of Non-Contradiction (Metaphysics Γ 4, 1006a11–1007a20). I consider a worry which has often been raised in connection with this proof. The worry is that, faced with an opponent who is prepared to tolerate contradictions, the argument is dialectically powerless: it is incapable of getting them to abandon their position. In reply, I argue that the proof needs to be seen in its proper context, that is, as part (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  29
    The sublime: from antiquity to the present.Timothy M. Costelloe (ed.) - 2012 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    This volume offers readers a unique and comprehensive overview of theoretical perspectives on "the sublime," the singular aesthetic response elicited by phenomena that move viewers by transcending and overwhelming them. The book consists of an editor's introduction and fifteen chapters written from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Part One examines philosophical approaches advanced historically to account for the phenomenon, beginning with Longinus, moving through eighteenth and nineteenth century writers in Britain, France, and Germany, and concluding with developments in contemporary continental (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  25.  21
    The discourse of modernism.Timothy J. Reiss - 1982 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
    On method, discursive logics, and epistemology -- Questions of medieval discursive practice -- From the middle ages to the (w)hole of Utopia -- Kepler, his Dream, and the analysis and pattern of thought -- Campanella and Bacon: concerning structures of mind -- The masculine birth of time -- Cyrano and the experimental discourse -- The myth of sun and moon -- The difficulty of writing -- Crusoe rights his story -- Gulliver's critique of Euclid -- Emergence, consolidation, and dominance of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  26. Three Faces of Desire.Timothy Schroeder - 2004 - New York, US: Oxford University Press.
    To desire something is a condition familiar to everyone. It is uncontroversial that desiring has something to do with motivation, something to do with pleasure, and something to do with reward. Call these "the three faces of desire." The standard philosophical theory at present holds that the motivational face of desire presents its unique essence--to desire a state of affairs is to be disposed to act so as to bring it about. A familiar but less standard account holds the hedonic (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   156 citations  
  27. What is the unity of consciousness?Timothy J. Bayne & David J. Chalmers - 2003 - In Axel Cleeremans (ed.), The Unity of Consciousness: Binding, Integration, and Dissociation. Oxford University Press.
    At any given time, a subject has a multiplicity of conscious experiences. A subject might simultaneously have visual experiences of a red book and a green tree, auditory experiences of birds singing, bodily sensations of a faint hunger and a sharp pain in the shoulder, the emotional experience of a certain melancholy, while having a stream of conscious thoughts about the nature of reality. These experiences are distinct from each other: a subject could experience the red book without the singing (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   121 citations  
  28.  39
    The processing-speed theory of adult age differences in cognition.Timothy A. Salthouse - 1996 - Psychological Review 103 (3):403-428.
  29.  13
    Teaching by Examples: Rousseau’s Lawgiver and the Case of Benjamin Franklin.Timothy Brennan - 2024 - Political Theory 52 (3):348-373.
    Rousseau’s account of the “legislator” or “lawgiver” is commonly regarded as one of the most far-fetched, ominous, and baffling parts of his teaching in the Social Contract. In brief, Rousseau’s lawgiver seems to be a proto-totalitarian figure whose self-appointed mission is to found a political community by “denaturing” people at a single stroke and who may be a mere figment of Rousseau’s overheated imagination. Accordingly, this part of the Social Contract threatens to make a mockery of Rousseau’s claim to be (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Skeptical Theism, Abductive Atheology, and Theory Versioning.Timothy Perrine & Stephen J. Wykstra - 2014 - In Justin McBrayer Trent Dougherty (ed.), Skeptical Theism: New Essays. Oxford University Press.
    What we call “the evidential argument from evil” is not one argument but a family of them, originating (perhaps) in the 1979 formulation of William Rowe. Wykstra’s early versions of skeptical theism emerged in response to Rowe’s evidential arguments. But what sufficed as a response to Rowe may not suffice against later more sophisticated versions of the problem of evil—in particular, those along the lines pioneered by Paul Draper. Our chief aim here is to make an earlier version of skeptical (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  31.  9
    Reader's Guide to Lesbian and Gay Studies.Timothy Murphy (ed.) - 2000 - 2000, Chicago, 2013 New York: 2000, Fitzroy Dearborn. 2013 Routledge..
    The Reader's Guide to Lesbian and Gay Literature identifies key resources for topics important to the theory and practice of lesbian and gay politics, literature, religion, and more. The book contains hundreds of entries that summarize key issues at stake and then identify (mostly) book-length analysis of this topics. The topics range from activism, to age of consent, to legal history as well as individual entries on key authors and regional areas.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  16
    Précis of Three Faces of Desire.Timothy Schroeder - 2006 - Dialogue 45 (1):125-130.
  33.  2
    For the sake of simplicity: Applying software design parsimony to the content of information system ontologies.Timothy Tambassi - 2023 - Zagadnienia Filozoficzne W Nauce 75:135-155.
    Although many information system ontologies (ISOs) claim to be parsimonious, the notion of parsimony seems to influence the debate on ISOs only at the level of vague and uncritical assumption. To challenge this trend, the paper aims to clarify what it means for ISOs to be parsimonious. Specifically, section 2 shows that parsimony in computer science generally concerns software design and, together with elegance, is one of the two aspects of the broader notion of simplicity. Section 3 transforms the main (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  53
    In Defense of Conciliar Christology: A Philosophical Essay.Timothy Pawl - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This work presents a historically informed, systematic exposition of the Christology of the first seven Ecumenical Councils of undivided Christendom, from the First Council of Nicaea in 325 AD to the Second Council of Nicaea in 787 AD. Assuming the truth of Conciliar Christology for the sake of argument, Timothy Pawl considers whether there are good philosophical arguments that show a contradiction or incoherence in that doctrine. He presents the definitions of important terms in the debate and a helpful (...)
  35. Vagueness, indeterminacy and social meaning.Timothy Williamson - 2001 - Critical Studies 16 (1):61--76.
  36. Toward a unified ecology.Timothy F. H. Allen, Thomas W. Hoekstra & Frank N. Egerton - 1995 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 17 (1):173.
  37. Unexpected pleasure.Timothy Schroeder - 2008 - In Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (eds.), The modularity of emotions. Calgary, Alta., Canada: University of Calgary Press. pp. 255-272.
    As topics in the philosophy of emotion, pleasure and displeasure get less than their fair share of attention. On the one hand, there is the fact that pleasure and displeasure are given no role at all in many theories of the emotions, and secondary roles in many others.1 On the other, there is the centrality of pleasure and displeasure to being emotional. A woman who tears up because of a blustery wind, while an ill-advised burrito weighs heavily upon her digestive (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38.  16
    A Calculating Profession: Victorian Actuaries among the Statisticians.Timothy L. Alborn - 1994 - Science in Context 7 (3):433-468.
    The ArgumentHistorians of science naturally tend to express interest in other forms of intellectual activity only when these intersect with science. This tendncy has produced a number of enlightening studies of what happens when science and (for instance) law or theology come into contact, but little by way of how science enters into the calculations and social status of such forms of knowledge after the conjuction has passed. Recent work in the sociology of professions, in contrast, has focused attention precisely (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  39. The feeling of doing: Deconstructing the phenomenology of agnecy.Timothy J. Bayne & Neil Levy - 2006 - In Natalie Sebanz & Wolfgang Prinz (eds.), Disorders of Volition. Cambridge: MIT Press.
    Disorders of volition are often accompanied by, and may even be caused by, disruptions in the phenomenology of agency. Yet the phenomenology of agency is at present little explored. In this paper we attempt to describe the experience of normal agency, in order to uncover its representational content.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  40.  24
    Concepts, Understanding, Analyticity.Timothy Williamson - 2007 - In The Philosophy of Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 497–537.
    A case in point is Frank Jackson’s talk of “conceptual possibility” and “conceptual necessity.” He writes as if the issue between us is the relative methodological priority for philosophy of conceptual modalities and metaphysical modalities. In addition to the uncritical reliance on conceptual modality, another fallacy is surfacing. Paul Boghossian developed an epistemology of logic based on understanding‐assent links corresponding to fundamental rules of logic. His paradigm was modus ponens: a necessary condition for understanding “if” was supposed to be willingness (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  39
    Objectifying Subjective Probabilities: Dutch Book Arguments for Principles of Direct Inference.Timothy Childers - 2012 - In Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao J. Gonzalez, Stephan Hartmann, Michael Stöltzner & Marcel Weber (eds.), Probabilities, Laws, and Structures. Springer.
  42.  17
    Knowledge of Metaphysical Modality.Timothy Williamson - 2007 - In The Philosophy of Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 136–180.
    This chapter argues that the ordinary cognitive capacity to handle counterfactual conditionals carries with it the cognitive capacity to handle metaphysical modality. It aims to illustrate with examples our cognitive use of counterfactual conditionals, and sketches an epistemology for such conditionals. The chapter explains how they subsume metaphysical modality, and assesses the consequences for the distinction between a priori and a posteriori knowledge. It discusses the relation between metaphysical possibility and the restricted kinds of possibility that seem more relevant to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43.  15
    Wittgensteinian Approaches.Timothy Williamson - 2007 - In The Philosophy of Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 538–568.
    Moore’s sympathies are anti‐realist. As an example of an antirealist account of truth, he gives what he calls “the Wittgensteinian View” of truth for mathematical discourse. In attempting to show how to “sidestep certainly apparently decisive objections” to the Wittgensteinian View, Moore acquiesces in the charge that it makes the consistency of a mathematical theory a matter of stipulation: we adopt a rule “that guarantees the consistency of Peano Arithmetic.” Moore’s main concern is the defensibility of anti‐realist view of philosophical (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44.  13
    Knowledge Maximization.Timothy Williamson - 2007 - In The Philosophy of Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 249–279.
    This chapter explores some general aspects of the tension between one’s role as a believer and one’s role as an appraiser of oneself as a believer in philosophy. The proposal is to replace true belief by knowledge in a principle of charity constitutive of content. Knowledge maximization need not make the ascription of knowledge come too cheap. By contrast, Davidson’s principle of charity gives good marks to an interpretation for having Stone Age people assent to many truths of quantum mechanics, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Appendix 2: Counterfactual Donkeys.Timothy Williamson - 2007 - In The Philosophy of Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 307–310.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Appendix 1: Modal Logic within Counterfactual Logic.Timothy Williamson - 2007 - In The Philosophy of Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 295–306.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47. Bibliography.Timothy Williamson - 2007 - In The Philosophy of Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 598–618.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Index.Timothy Williamson - 2007 - In The Philosophy of Philosophy. Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 619–642.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Archaeology through the looking glass.Timothy Yates - 1990 - In Ian Bapty & Tim Yates (eds.), Archaeology after structuralism: post-structuralism and the practice of archaeology. London: Routledge.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  38
    HIV status and age at first marriage among women in Cameroon.Timothy Adair - 2008 - Journal of Biosocial Science 40 (5):743-760.
    Summary Recent research has highlighted the risk of HIV infection for married teenage women compared with their unmarried counterparts (Clark, 2004). This study assesses whether a relationship exists, for women who have completed their adolescence (age 20–29 years), between HIV status with age at first marriage and the length of time between first sex and first marriage. Multivariate analysis utilizing the nationally representative 2004 Cameroon Demographic and Health Survey shows that late-marrying women and those with a longer period of pre-marital (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 989