Results for 'Timothy Gough'

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  1. Becoming a Revolutionary. The Deputies of the French National Assembly and the Emergence of a Revolutionary Culture (1789-1790). By Timothy Tackett. [REVIEW]H. Gough - 1998 - The European Legacy 3:127-127.
     
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  2.  28
    Vagueness.Timothy Williamson - 1995 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 46 (4):589-601.
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  3.  46
    Instituting science: the cultural production of scientific disciplines.Timothy Lenoir - 1997 - Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press.
    Early practitioners of the social studies of science turned their attention away from questions of institutionalisation, which had tended to emphasize macrolevel explanations, and attended instead to microstudies of laboratory practice. The author is interested in re-investigating certain aspects of institution formation, notably the formation of scientific, medical, and engineering disciplines. He emphasises the manner in which science as cultural practice is imbricated with other forms of social, political, and even aesthetic practices. The author considers the following topics: the organic (...)
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  4.  50
    Parallel Distributed Processing at 25: Further Explorations in the Microstructure of Cognition.Timothy T. Rogers & James L. McClelland - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (6):1024-1077.
    This paper introduces a special issue of Cognitive Science initiated on the 25th anniversary of the publication of Parallel Distributed Processing (PDP), a two-volume work that introduced the use of neural network models as vehicles for understanding cognition. The collection surveys the core commitments of the PDP framework, the key issues the framework has addressed, and the debates the framework has spawned, and presents viewpoints on the current status of these issues. The articles focus on both historical roots and contemporary (...)
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  5.  17
    Philosophical Criticisms of Experimental Philosophy.Timothy Williamson - 2016 - In Wesley Buckwalter & Justin Sytsma (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Malden, MA: Blackwell. pp. 22–36.
    The philosophical relevance of experimental psychology is hard to dispute. Much more controversial is the so‐called negative program's critique of armchair philosophical methodology, in particular the reliance on ‘intuitions’ about thought experiments. This chapter responds to that critique. It argues that, since the negative program has been forced to extend the category of intuition to ordinary judgments about real‐life cases, the critique is in immediate danger of generating into global scepticism, because all human judgments turn out to depend on intuitions. (...)
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  6.  52
    Monumental changes: The civic harm argument for the removal of Confederate monuments.Timothy J. Barczak & Winston C. Thompson - 2021 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 55 (3):439-452.
    Journal of Philosophy of Education, EarlyView.
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  7. Knowledge First.Timothy Williamson - 2013 - In Matthias Steup & John Turri (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Epistemology. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Blackwell. pp. 1-10.
  8. Indefinite extensibility.Timothy Williamson - 1999 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 55 (1):1-24.
    Of all the cases made against classical logic, Michael Dummett's is the most deeply considered. Issuing from a systematic and original conception of the discipline, it constitutes one of the most distinctive achievements of twentieth century British philosophy. Although Dummett builds on the work of Brouwer and Heyting, he provides the case against classical logic with a new, explicit and general foundation in the philosophy of language. Dummett's central arguments, widely celebrated if not widely endorsed, concern the implications of the (...)
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  9.  17
    Subjunctive Reasoning.Timothy McCarthy - 1981 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 46 (1):170-173.
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  10.  96
    The effects of feelings of guilt on the behaviour of uncooperative individuals in repeated social bargaining games: An affect-as-information interpretation of the role of emotion in social interaction.Timothy Ketelaar & Wing Tung Au - 2003 - Cognition and Emotion 17 (3):429-453.
  11.  52
    Analogical Cognition: an Insight into Word Meaning.Timothy Pritchard - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (3):587-607.
    Analogical cognition, extensively researched by Dedre Gentner and her colleagues over the past thirty five years, has been described as the core of human cognition, and it characterizes our use of many words. This research provides significant insight into the nature of word meaning, but it has been ignored by linguists and philosophers of language. I discuss some of the implications of the research for our account of word meaning. In particular, I argue that the research points to, and helps (...)
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  12. Reponses to Critics.Timothy Williamson - 2009 - In Duncan Pritchard & Patrick Greenough (eds.), Williamson on Knowledge. Oxford, GB: Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  13.  26
    Executive functioning as a potential mediator of age-related cognitive decline in normal adults.Timothy A. Salthouse, Thomas M. Atkinson & Diane E. Berish - 2003 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 132 (4):566.
  14.  66
    First-Order Logics for Comparative Similarity.Timothy Williamson - 1988 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 29 (4):457-481.
    If we speak of degrees of similarity, what kinds of judgment are we assuming to make sense? It will be argued that the necessary and sufficient condition for there to be degrees of similarity is that there should be a four-termed relation of comparative similarity — w resembles x at least as much as y resembles z—obeying certain constraints. Of course, nothing turns on how we use the words 'degree of similarity'. Rather, the point is to distinguish the different levels (...)
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  15.  10
    On Perspectivism of Information System Ontologies.Timothy Tambassi - forthcoming - Foundations of Science:1-15.
    The growing diffusion of perspectivism within the debate on information system ontologies [ISOs] does not correspond to a thorough analysis of what perspectivism specifically consists of. This paper aims to fill this void. First, I show what supporting perspectivism in information system ontologies [PISO] means in terms of (minimal) claims and implications; then I argue that the definitions of ISO implicitly assume PISO’s (minimal) claims or, in other words, that ISOs presuppose and maintain PISO. Section 2 presents the main definitions (...)
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  16. Indicative versus subjunctive conditionals, congruential versus non-hyperintensional contexts.Timothy Williamson - 2006 - Philosophical Issues 16 (1):310–333.
    §0. A familiar if obscure idea: an indicative conditional presents its consequent as holding in the actual world on the supposition that its antecedent so holds, whereas a subjunctive conditional merely presents its consequent as holding in a world, typically counterfactual, in which its antecedent holds. Consider this pair.
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  17.  47
    Integral Theory: A Poisoned Chalice?Timothy Rutzou - 2012 - Journal of Critical Realism 11 (2):215-224.
    In light of the recent symposium, this paper analyses integral theory through original and dialectical critical realism. This paper maintains that Integral theory is unable to sustain its critique against modernity and postmodernity as a result of the adoption of Kantian, Hegelian, and Heideggerian ontology. The resulting actualism and structure, perpetrates ontological violence, as it attempts to resolve the problems of modernity and postmodernity. An adoption of critical realism as underlabourer would call into question many of the theoretical underpinnings of (...)
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  18. Reply to John Hawthorne and Maria Lasonen-Aarnio.Timothy Williamson - unknown
    1. As John Hawthorne and Maria Lasonen-Aarnio appreciate, some of the central issues raised in their ‘Knowledge and Objective Chance’ arise for all but the most extreme theories of knowledge. In a wide range of cases, according to very plausible everyday judgments, we know something about the future, even though, according to quantum mechanics, our belief has a small but nonzero chance (objective probability) of being untrue. In easily constructed examples, we are in that position simultaneously with respect to many (...)
     
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  19.  84
    Supervaluationism and good reasoning.Timothy Williamson - 2018 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 33 (3):521-537.
    This paper is a tribute to Delia Graff Fara. It extends her work on failures of meta-rules for validity as truth-preservation under a supervaluationist identification of truth with supertruth. She showed that such failures occur even in languages without special vagueness-related operators, for standards of deductive reasoning as materially rather than purely logically good, depending on a context-dependent background. This paper extends her argument to: quantifier meta-rules like existential elimination; ambiguity; deliberately vague standard mathematical notation. Supervaluationist attempts to qualify the (...)
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  20.  48
    Language and Organisation of Filipino Emotion Concepts: Comparing Emotion Concepts and Dimensions across Cultures.Timothy Church, Marcia S. Katigbak, Jose Alberto S. Reyes & Stacia M. Jensen - 1998 - Cognition and Emotion 12 (1):63-92.
  21.  21
    Re-Imagining Social Science.Timothy Rutzou - 2016 - Journal of Critical Realism 15 (4):327-341.
    In 2015 IACR held its annual conference at Notre Dame (USA) around the theme of Re-Imagining Social Science. It is rather fashionable to acknowledge that there is a crisis in the social sciences to...
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  22.  20
    Circles of Ethics: The Impact of Proximity on Moral Reasoning.Timothy Kozitza, Carlos Mello E. Souza & Cristina Wildermuth - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (1):17-42.
    We report the results of an experiment designed to determine the effects of psychological proximity—proxied by awareness of pain and friendship—on moral reasoning. Our study tests the hypotheses that a moral agent’s emphasis on justice decreases with proximity, while his/her emphasis on care increases. Our study further examines how personality, gender, and managerial status affect the importance of care and justice in moral reasoning. We find support for the main hypotheses. We also find that care should be split into two (...)
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  23.  98
    Reply to McGee and McLaughlin.Timothy Williamson - 2004 - Linguistics and Philosophy 27 (1):113-122.
  24.  43
    Denying the Body? Memory and the Dilemmas of History in Descartes.Timothy J. Reiss - 1996 - Journal of the History of Ideas 57 (4):587-607.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Denying the Body? Memory and the Dilemmas of History in DescartesTimothy J. ReissIn an essay first published in The New York Review of Books in January 1983, touching her apprenticeship as writer, the Barbadian /American novelist Paule Marshall described the long afternoon conversations with which her mother and friends used to relax in the family kitchen. She recalled how they saw things as composed of opposites; not torn, but (...)
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  25. Tennant's troubles.Timothy Williamson - 2008 - In Joe Salerno (ed.), New Essays on the Knowability Paradox. Oxford, England and New York, NY, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 183--204.
    First, some reminiscences. In the years 1973-80, when I was an undergraduate and then graduate student at Oxford, Michael Dummett’s formidable and creative philosophical presence made his arguments impossible to ignore. In consequence, one pole of discussion was always a form of anti-realism. It endorsed something like the replacement of truth-conditional semantics by verification-conditional semantics and of classical logic by intuitionistic logic, and the principle that all truths are knowable. It did not endorse the principle that all truths are known. (...)
     
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  26.  21
    Apprehending Care in the Flesh: Reading Cavarero with Spillers.Timothy J. Huzar - 2021 - Diacritics 49 (3):6-27.
    Abstract:In this article I stage an encounter between Adriana Cavarero's account of uniqueness and Hortense Spillers's account of the flesh. Doing so is valuable for two reasons: First, it forces Cavarero's thought to consider not only the exclusion of women from the Western tradition, but also the anti-Blackness foundational to this tradition. This both expands and contorts Cavarero's thought, affirming her key claims while also altering them in the process. Second, reading Cavarero and Spillers together allows me to explore the (...)
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  27. Herbert Hart and the Semantic Sting.Timothy Endicott - 2000 - In Jules L. Coleman (ed.), Hart's Postscript: Essays on the Postscript to `the Concept of Law'. New York: Oxford University Press UK.
     
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  28.  6
    Critical religion and critical research on religion: A response to the April 2016 editorial.Timothy Fitzgerald - 2016 - Critical Research on Religion 4 (3):307-313.
    This response takes up some of the editorial comments for further clarification and critique. My point has been that ‘politics’ is as much a modern invention as ‘religion’. We cannot understand the rhetorical function of ‘religion’ if we treat it as a stand-alone category referring to some supposed object or objects in the world. I am especially concerned here to keep in view the oscillating binary categories of which ‘religion' forms one parasitic half, and ‘politics' or ‘science' the other. This (...)
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  29. Law is Necessarily Vague.Timothy Endicott - 2001 - Legal Theory 7 (1):377--83.
    In fact, law is necessarily very vague. So if vagueness is a problem for legal theory, it is a serious problem. The problem has to do with the ideal of the rule of law and with the very idea of law: if vague standards provide no guidance in some cases, how can the life of a community be ruled by law? The problem has long concerned philosophers of law; the papers at this symposium address it afresh by asking what legal (...)
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  30.  14
    Genes, interactions, and the development of behavior.Timothy D. Johnston & Laura Edwards - 2002 - Psychological Review 109 (1):26-34.
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  31.  44
    The Logical Home of Kant’s Table of Functions.Timothy Rosenkoetter - 2017 - In Sally Sedgwick & Dina Emundts (eds.), Logik / Logic. De Gruyter. pp. 29-52.
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  32.  57
    Can cognition be factorized into internal and external components?Timothy Williamson - 2006 - In Robert J. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 291-306.
    This book chapter is not currently available in ORA. Citation: Williamson, T. Can cognition be factorised into internal and external components? In: Stainton, R. Contemporary debates in cognitive science. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 291-306.
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  33.  20
    On the Content of Experience.Ben Caplan Timothy Schroeder - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):590-611.
    The intentionalist about consciousness holds that the qualitative character of experience, “what it’s like,” is determined by the contents of a select group of special intentional states of the subject. Fred Dretske (1995), Mike Thau (2002), Michael Tye (1995) and many others have embraced intentionalism, but these philosophers have not generally appreciated that, since we are intimately familiar with the qualitative character of experience, we thereby have special access to the nature of these contents. In this paper, we take advantage (...)
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  34. Time for Change.Timothy A. Johnson - 2007 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):497-513.
    Metaphysical theories of change incorporate substantive commitments to theories of persistence. The two most prominent classes of such theories are endurantism and perdurantism. Defenders of endurancestyle accounts of change, such as Klein, Hinchliff, and Oderberg, do so through appeal to a priori intuitions about change. We argue that this methodology is understandable but mistaken—an adequate metaphysics of change must accommodate all experiences of change, not merely intuitions about a limited variety of cases. Once we examine additional experiences of change, particularly (...)
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  35.  6
    Precis of VaguenessVagueness.Timothy Williamson - 1997 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 57 (4):921.
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  36.  71
    Continuity in Leibniz's mature metaphysics.Timothy Crockett - 1999 - Philosophical Studies 94 (1-2):119-138.
    In his early discussion of the structure of matter and motion, Leibniz quite explicitly appeals to Aristotle's characterization of continuity, and seems to adopt something like it as his own. Commentators usually assume that Leibniz continues to understand the notion of continuity in this way for the rest of his life. This paper argues that although he does continue to use something like the Aristotelian conception well into the mature period of his thought, he articulates a second sense of continuity (...)
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  37.  40
    Gay and lesbian exceptions to the heterosexual rule.Timothy F. Murphy - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (4):18.
  38.  20
    Fundamental issues in the evolutionary psychology of music: Assessing innateness and domain-specificity.Timothy Justus & Jeffrey Hutsler - 2005 - Music Perception 23 (1):1–27.
    Evolutionary psychology often does not sufficiently document the innate constraint and domain specificity required for strong adaptationist argument. We develop these criteria within the domain of music. First, we advocate combining computational, developmental, cross-cultural, and neuroscience research to address the ways in which a domain is innately constrained. Candidate constraints in music include the importance of the octave and other simple pitch ratios, the categorization of the octave into tones, the importance of melodic contour, tonal hierarchies, and principles of grouping (...)
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  39.  31
    Interpretation, jurisdiction, and the authority of law.Timothy Endicott - 2007 - American Philosophical Association Newsletter 6:14-19.
    People can be autonomous, if they are subject to authority. In particular, they can be autonomous if they are subject to the authority of law. I defend the first claim through a study of Joseph Raz's compelling account of authority; I claim that his work leads to the conclusion that autonomous judgment is needed to determine the jurisdiction of an authority, and to interpret its directives. I defend the second claim by arguing that law does not claim unlimited jurisdiction, and (...)
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  40.  40
    A simple model from a powerful framework that spans levels of analysis.Timothy T. Rogers & James L. McClelland - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):729-749.
    The commentaries reflect three core themes that pertain not just to our theory, but to the enterprise of connectionist modeling more generally. The first concerns the relationship between a cognitive theory and an implemented computer model. Specifically, how does one determine, when a model departs from the theory it exemplifies, whether the departure is a useful simplification or a critical flaw? We argue that the answer to this question depends partially upon the model's intended function, and we suggest that connectionist (...)
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  41.  6
    The Light on Hartman Green: Natural Scientists, Business Education, and an Ecological Business Paradigm.Timothy W. Sipe - 2020 - Humanistic Management Journal 5 (2):279-286.
    Considerable effort has been devoted over the last fifteen years by faculty and administrators in numerous colleges and universities, and by organizations such as the Aspen Institute and Teagle Foundation, to enhancing business education through broad infusion of the perspectives and content of the liberal arts. The emphasis has been on integration of the social sciences and especially the humanities. The author—a natural scientist—recounts a seminal experience that motivated him to work more intensively on this initiative with his colleagues across (...)
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  42.  25
    Hume's Aesthetics: The Literature and Directions for Research.Timothy M. Costelloe - 2004 - Hume Studies 30 (1):87-126.
    While there is hardly an aspect of Hume’s work that has not produced controversy of one sort or another, deciphering and evaluating his views on aesthetics involves overcoming interpretive barriers of a particular sort. In addition to what is generally taken as the anachronistic attribution of “aesthetic theories” to any thinker of the eighteenth century, Hume presents the added difficulty that unlike the other founding-fathers of modern philosophical aesthetics, he produced no systematic work on the subject, and certainly nothing comparable (...)
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  43.  65
    Unexceptional Moral Knowledge.Timothy Williamson - 2022 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 49 (4):405-415.
    The article defends moral realism against epistemological objections by arguing that if there are moral truths, some of them are known. The claim that moral properties are unknowable because causally inert is shown to be ineffective: none of the main current theories of knowledge requires a causal connection, and anyway moral properties have not been shown to be causally inert. It is explained why a posteriori moral knowledge need not derive from combining a priori moral knowledge with a posteriori non-moral (...)
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  44.  17
    Imaginaries in real closed valued fields.Timothy Mellor - 2006 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 139 (1):230-279.
    The paper shows elimination of imaginaries for real closed valued fields to suitable sorts. We also show that this result is in some sense optimal. The paper includes a quantifier elimination theorem for real closed valued fields in a language with sorts for the field, value group and residue field.
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  45.  29
    Finding Bhaskar in all the wrong places? Causation, process, and structure in Bhaskar and Deleuze.Timothy Rutzou - 2017 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 47 (4):402-417.
    This article examines the reception of Roy Bhaskar amongst some contemporary Deleuzians. It proceeds by rejecting the all too often predilection of opposing realism to ‘postmodernism’ or ‘post-structuralism’ arguing instead for the need to bring one into dialogue with the other. To this end, the paper explores the resonances and points of departure between the work of Gilles Deleuze and Roy Bhaskar. In particular, it examines the language of causation, object-oriented versus process-oriented ontologies, as well as the charge by Deleuzians (...)
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  46.  32
    Phylogenetic inertia and Darwin's higher law.Timothy Shanahan - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (1):60-68.
    The concept of ‘phylogenetic inertia’ is routinely deployed in evolutionary biology as an alternative to natural selection for explaining the persistence of characteristics that appear sub-optimal from an adaptationist perspective. However, in many of these contexts the precise meaning of ‘phylogenetic inertia’ and its relationship to selection are far from clear. After tracing the history of the concept of ‘inertia’ in evolutionary biology, I argue that treating phylogenetic inertia and natural selection as alternative explanations is mistaken because phylogenetic inertia is, (...)
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  47.  17
    Phylogenetic inertia and Darwin’s higher law.Timothy Shanahan - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 42 (1):60-68.
    The concept of ‘phylogenetic inertia’ is routinely deployed in evolutionary biology as an alternative to natural selection for explaining the persistence of characteristics that appear sub-optimal from an adaptationist perspective. However, in many of these contexts the precise meaning of ‘phylogenetic inertia’ and its relationship to selection are far from clear. After tracing the history of the concept of ‘inertia’ in evolutionary biology, I argue that treating phylogenetic inertia and natural selection as alternative explanations is mistaken because phylogenetic inertia is, (...)
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  48.  47
    Continuous creation and secondary causation: the threat of occasionalism.Timothy D. Miller - 2011 - Religious Studies 47 (1):3-22.
    One standard criticism of the doctrine of continuous creation is that it entails the occasionalist position that God alone is a true cause and that the events we commonly identify as causes are merely the occasions upon which God brings about effects. I begin by clearly stating Malebranche's argument from continuous creation to occasionalism. Next, I examine two strategies for resisting Malebranche's argument – strong and weak concurrentism – and argue that weak concurrentism is the more promising strategy. Finally, I (...)
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  49. The Concept of Breakdown in Heidegger, Leont'ev, and Dewey and Its Implications for Education.Timothy Koschmann, Kari Kuutti & Larry Hickman - 1998 - Mind, Culture, and Activity 5 (1):25--41.
     
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  50.  90
    Kant on Construction, Apriority, and the Moral Relevance of Universalization.Timothy Rosenkoetter - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (6):1143-1174.
    This paper introduces a referential reading of Kant’s practical project, according to which maxims are made morally permissible by their correspondence to objects, though not the ontic objects of Kant’s theoretical project but deontic objects (what ought to be). It illustrates this model by showing how the content of the Formula of Universal Law might be determined by what our capacity of practical reason can stand in a referential relation to, rather than by facts about what kind of beings we (...)
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