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Thomas Wynn [13]Thomas A. Wynn [1]
  1. Materiality and human cognition.Karenleigh Overmann & Thomas Wynn - 2019 - Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory 2 (26):457–478.
    In this paper, we examine the role of materiality in human cognition. We address issues such as the ways in which brain functions may change in response to interactions with material forms, the attributes of material forms that may cause change in brain functions, and the spans of time required for brain functions to reorganize when interacting with material forms. We then contrast thinking through materiality with thinking about it. We discuss these in terms of their evolutionary significance and history (...)
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  2. Archaeology and cognitive evolution.Thomas Wynn - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):389-402.
    Archaeology can provide two bodies of information relevant to the understanding of the evolution of human cognition – the timing of developments, and the evolutionary context of these developments. The challenge is methodological. Archaeology must document attributes that have direct implications for underlying cognitive mechanisms. One example of such a cognitive archaeology is found in spatial cognition. The archaeological record documents an evolutionary sequence that begins with ape-equivalent spatial abilities 2.5 million years ago and ends with the appearance of modern (...)
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  3.  22
    Technical cognition, working memory and creativity.Thomas Wynn & Frederick L. Coolidge - 2014 - Pragmatics and Cognition 22 (1):45-63.
    This essay explores the nature and neurological basis of creativity in technical production. After presenting a model of expert technical cognition based in cognitive anthropology and cognitive psychology, the authors propose that craft production has three inherent sources of novelty — procedural drift, serendipitous error and fiddling. However, these are quite limited in their creative potential, which may help explain the virtual absence of innovation over the long millennia of the Palaeolithic. Innovation can be far more rapid and effective via (...)
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  4.  14
    Symmetry and the evolution of the modular linguistic mind.Thomas Wynn - 2000 - In Peter Carruthers & A. Chamberlain (eds.), Evolution and the Human Mind: Modularity, Language and Meta-Cognition. Cambridge University Press. pp. 113--39.
  5. On Tools Making Minds: an Archaeological Perspective on Human Cognitive Evolution.Karenleigh A. Overmann & Thomas Wynn - 2019 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 19 (1-2):39-58.
    Using a model of cognition as extended and enactive, we examine the role of materiality in making minds as exemplified by lithics and writing, forms associated with conceptual thought and meta-awareness of conceptual domains. We address ways in which brain functions may change in response to interactions with material forms, the attributes of material forms that may cause such change, and the spans of time required for neurofunctional reorganization. We also offer three hypotheses for investigating co-influence and change in cognition (...)
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  6. The prehistory of number concept.Karenleigh A. Overmann, Thomas Wynn & Frederick L. Coolidge - 2011 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):142-144.
    Carey leaves unaddressed an important evolutionary puzzle: In the absence of a numeral list, how could a concept of natural number ever have arisen in the first place? Here we suggest that the initial development of natural number must have bootstrapped on a material culture scaffold of some sort, and illustrate how this might have occurred using strings of beads.
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  7.  14
    The comparative simplicity of tool-use and its implications for human evolution.Thomas Wynn - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):576-577.
  8.  19
    Microcantilever bend testing and finite element simulations of HIP-ed interface-free bulk Al and Al–Al HIP bonded interfaces.Nathan A. Mara, Justin Crapps, Thomas A. Wynn, Kester D. Clarke, Antonia Antoniou, Patricia O. Dickerson, David E. Dombrowski & Bogdan Mihaila - 2013 - Philosophical Magazine 93 (21):2749-2758.
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  9.  21
    Archaeological evidence for mimetic mind and culture.Thomas Wynn - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):774-774.
  10.  14
    Instructed and cooperative learning in human evolution.Thomas Wynn - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):539-540.
  11.  25
    Sex differences and evolutionary by-products.Thomas Wynn, Forrest Tierson & Craig Palmer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):265-266.
    From the perspective of evolutionary theory, we believe it makes more sense to view the sex differences in spatial cognition as being an evolutionary by-product of selection for optimal rates of fetal development. Geary does not convince us that his proposed selective factors operated with “sufficient precision, economy, and efficiency.” Moreover, the archaeological evidence does not support his proposed evolutionary scenario.
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  12.  33
    The devil in the details.Thomas Wynn - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):426-432.
    Despite challenges on minimum necessary competence, intentionality, reliability, and context, the example of cognitive archaeology presented in the target article holds up well. The commentaries also present perspectives on cognition and symmetry that suggest an alternative to the target article's characterization of the cognitive abilities of early Homo erectus. However, the major conclusion of the initial argument – that the human ability to coordinate shape recognition and spatial cognition evolved hundreds of thousands of year ago in conditions unlike those of (...)
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  13.  44
    The role of working memory in skilled and conceptual thought.Thomas Wynn & Fred Coolidge - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):703-704.
    Models of working memory challenge some aspects of Carruthers’ account but enhance others. Although the nature of the phonological store and central executive appear fully congruent with Carruthers’ proposal, current models of the visuo-spatial sketchpad provide a better account of skilled action. However, Carruthers’ model may provide a way around the homunculus problem that has plagued models of working memory.
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