Results for 'Thomas M. Donaldson'

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  1.  35
    Case-based seminars in medical ethics education: how medical students define and discuss moral problems.Thomas M. Donaldson, Elizabeth Fistein & Michael Dunn - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (12):816-820.
    Discussion of real cases encountered by medical students has been advocated as a component of medical ethics education. Suggested benefits include: a focus on the actual problems that medical students confront; active learner involvement; and facilitation of an exploration of the meaning of their own values in relation to professional behaviour. However, the approach may also carry risks: students may focus too narrowly on particular clinical topics or show a preference for discussing legal problems that may appear to have clearer (...)
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  2.  12
    Harming patients by provision of intensive care treatment: is it right to provide time-limited trials of intensive care to patients with a low chance of survival?Thomas M. Donaldson - 2021 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 24 (2):227-233.
    Time-limited trials of intensive care have arisen in response to the increasing demand for intensive care treatment for patients with a low chance of surviving their critical illness, and the clinical uncertainty inherent in intensive care decision-making. Intensive care treatment is reported by most patients to be a significantly unpleasant experience. Therefore, patients who do not survive intensive care treatment are exposed to a negative dying experience. Time-limited trials of intensive care treatment in patients with a low chance of surviving (...)
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  3.  6
    Understanding the Consequences of Repetitive Subconcussive Head Impacts in Sport: Brain Changes and Dampened Motor Control Are Seen After Boxing Practice.Thomas G. Di Virgilio, Magdalena Ietswaart, Lindsay Wilson, David I. Donaldson & Angus M. Hunter - 2019 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 13.
  4.  16
    Donaldsonian Themes: A Commentary.Thomas Donaldson - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (1):125-142.
    ABSTRACT:The articles in the special issue ofBusiness Ethics Quarterly, “Normative Business Ethics in a Global Economy: New Directions on Donaldsonian Themes,” were written by a set of outstanding scholars: Margaret M. Blair, Joseph P. Gaspar, Nien-hê Hsieh, Peter L. Jennings, Marietta Peytcheva, Andreas Georg Scherer, Amy J. Sepinwall, Andrew Stark, Danielle E. Warren, and Manuel Velasquez. In this commentary I reply to my colleagues, arranging my reply around the following themes: 1) the corporate moral agent; 2) the idea of a (...)
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  5. Aristotle and the pre-socratics.Thomas M. Robinson - 2004 - In Jorge J. E. Gracia & Jiyuan Yu (eds.), Uses and abuses of the classics: Western interpretations of Greek philosophy. Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
     
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  6. Presentism.Thomas M. Crisp - 2003 - In Michael J. Loux & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), The Oxford handbook of metaphysics. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  7.  11
    Social Contract Approaches to Business Ethics: Bridging the “Is‐Ought” Gap.Thomas W. Dunfee & Thomas Donaldson - 1999 - In Robert Frederick (ed.), A companion to business ethics. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell. pp. 38–55.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Background: mapping the field of business ethics The evolution of social contract approaches to business ethics Integrative social contracts theory (ISCT) Remaining issues and promising research directions for contractarian business ethics.
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  8.  23
    Religion, Reason and Nature in Early Modern Europe (review).Thomas M. Lennon - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):128-129.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Journal of the History of Philosophy 41.1 (2003) 128-129 [Access article in PDF] Robert Crocker, editor. Religion, Reason and Nature in Early Modern Europe. Dordrecht: Kluwer, 2001. Pp. xix + 228. Cloth, $77.00. By describing the early modern period as such, we thereby avow a continuity with it that ill squares with the following, insufficiently appreciated fact. The early modern counterparts of the largely atheistic American Philosophical Association, let's (...)
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  9.  29
    Thomas Aquinas on Virtue.Thomas M. Osborne - 2022 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Thomas Aquinas produced a voluminous body of work on moral theory, and much of that work is on virtue, particularly the status and value of the virtues as principles of virtuous acts, and the way in which a moral life can be organized around them schematically. Thomas Osborne presents Aquinas's account of virtue in its historical, philosophical and theological contexts, to show the reader what Aquinas himself wished to teach about virtue. His discussion makes the complexities of Aquinas's (...)
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  10. One Goodness, Many Goodnesses.Thomas M. Ward & Anne Jeffrey - forthcoming - Religious Studies.
    Some theories of goodness are descriptively rich: they have much to say about what makes things good. Neo-Aristotelian accounts, for instance, detail the various features that make a human being, a dog, a bee good relative to facts about those forms of life. Famously, such theories of relative goodness tend to be comparatively poor: they have little or nothing to say about what makes one kind of being better than another kind. Other theories of goodness—those that take there to be (...)
     
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  11.  97
    The moral basis of interpersonal comparisons.Thomas M. Scanlon - 1991 - In Jon Elster & John E. Roemer (eds.), Interpersonal comparisons of well-being. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 17--44.
  12.  41
    Reading Bayle.Thomas M. Lennon - 1999 - Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
    A critical but sympathetic treatment of Pierre Bayle.
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  13.  35
    Contractarian Business Ethics: Current Status and Next Steps.Thomas W. Dunfee & Thomas Donaldson - 1995 - Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (2):173-186.
    Abstract:Social contract is rapidly becoming one of the significant alternatives for analyzing ethical issues in business. Contractarian approaches emphasizing consent as a means of justifying principles can provide needed context for rendering normative judgements concerning economic behaviors. Current research issues include developing tests of consent for both hypothetical and extant social contracts, and empirically testing the assumptions of the major contractarian approaches. Open questions include exploring the relationship between contractarian business ethics and other approaches, such as stakeholder management and virtue (...)
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  14. Plato’s Republic and Its Contemporary Relevance in the Ethics of Rist and MacIntyre.Thomas M. Osborne - 2020 - In Barry David (ed.), Passionate Mind: Essays in Ancient Philosophy,Patristics, and Ethics Honoring Professor John M. Rist. Akademia. pp. 371-392.
    the contrast and similarity between Rist and Macintyre can be better understood if we take into account their different interpretations of the Republic, especially their 1) descriptions of the primary problem faced by Plato, 2) their interpretation of Plato’s response to the problem, and 3) their evaluation of the contemporary relevance of the problem and his response. The differences and similarities between the views of MacIntyre and Rist on the Republic reflect much larger difference and similarities on the fundamental nature (...)
     
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  15.  5
    Ficino’s Pythagoras.Thomas M. Robinson - 2013 - In Gabriele Cornelli, Richard D. McKirahan & Constantinos Macris (eds.), On Pythagoreanism. Berlin: De Gruyter. pp. 423-434.
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  16.  4
    41. Human Nature and Genetic Manipulation: The Future of Human Nature (2001).Thomas M. Schmidt - 2018 - In Hauke Brunkhorst, Regina Kreide & Cristina Lafont (eds.), The Habermas handbook. New York: Columbia University Press. pp. 461-473.
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  17. Presentism and the grounding objection.Thomas M. Crisp - 2007 - Noûs 41 (1):90–109.
  18.  45
    The Human Eros: Eco-Ontology and the Aesthetics of Existence.Thomas M. Alexander - 2013 - Fordham University Press.
    " Our various cultures are symbolic environments or "spiritual ecologies" within which the Human Eros can thrive. This is how we inhabit the earth. Encircling and sustaining our cultural existence is nature.
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  19.  66
    Plato's Charmides: positive Elenchus in a "Socratic" dialogue.Thomas M. Tuozzo - 2011 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This book argues that Plato's Charmides presents a unitary but incomplete argument intended to lead its readers to substantive philosophical insights.
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  20. On presentism and triviality.Thomas M. Crisp - 2004 - Oxford Studies in Metaphysics 1:15-20.
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  21. John Dewey’s Theory of Art, Experience and Nature: The Horizons of Feeling.Thomas M. Alexander - 1987 - State University of New York Press.
    Thomas Alexander shows that the primary, guiding concern of Dewey's philosophy is his theory of aesthetic experience.
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  22.  10
    8. Beyond the Death of Art: Community and the Ecology of the Self.Thomas M. Alexander - 1997 - In Richard E. Hart & Douglas R. Anderson (eds.), Philosophy in experience: American philosophy in transition. New York: Fordham University Press. pp. 173-194.
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  23. Bayle and Late Seventeen-Century Thought.Thomas M. Lennon - 2002 - In John P. Wright & Paul Potter (eds.), Psyche and Soma: Physicians and Metaphysicians on the Mind-Body Problem From Antiquity to Enlightenment. Clarendon Press.
     
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  24. On Justification, Idealization, and Discursive Purchase.Thomas M. Besch - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (3):601-623.
    Conceptions of acceptability-based moral or political justification take it that authoritative acceptability constitutes, or contributes to, validity, or justification. There is no agreement as to what bar for authoritativeness such justification may employ. The paper engages the issue in relation to (i) the level of idealization that a bar for authoritativeness, ψ, imparts to a standard of acceptability-based justification, S, and (ii) the degree of discursive purchase of the discursive standing that S accords to people when it builds ψ. I (...)
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  25.  6
    Protagoras and the Definition of ‘Sophist’ in the Sophist.Thomas M. Robinson - 2013 - In Beatriz Bossi & Thomas M. Robinson (eds.), Plato's "Sophist" Revisited. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. pp. 3-14.
  26. On Robust Discursive Equality.Thomas M. Besch - 2019 - Dialogue 58 (3):1-26.
    This paper explores the idea of robust discursive equality on which respect-based conceptions of justificatory reciprocity often draw. I distinguish between formal and substantive discursive equality and argue that if justificatory reciprocity requires that people be accorded formally equal discursive standing, robust discursive equality should not be construed as requiring standing that is equal substantively, or in terms of its discursive purchase. Still, robust discursive equality is purchase sensitive: it does not obtain when discursive standing is impermissibly unequal in purchase. (...)
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  27. Untangling the corruption knot: global bribery viewed through the lens of integrative social contract theory.Thomas W. Dunfee & Thomas J. Donaldson - 2002 - In Norman E. Bowie (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Business Ethics. Blackwell. pp. 6--61.
  28. On Discursive Respect.Thomas M. Besch - 2014 - Social Theory and Practice 40 (2):207-231.
    Moral and political forms of constructivism accord to people strong, “constitutive” forms of discursive standing and so build on, or express, a commitment to discursive respect. The paper explores dimensions of discursive respect, i.e., depth, scope, and purchase; it addresses tenuous interdependencies between them; on this basis, it identifies limitations of the idea of discursive respect and of constructivism. The task of locating discursive respect in the normative space defined by its three dimensions is partly, and importantly, an ethical task (...)
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  29. Presentism and "Cross-Time" Relations.Thomas M. Crisp - 2005 - American Philosophical Quarterly 42 (1):5 - 17.
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  30.  16
    Mythos and Polyphonic Pluralism.Thomas M. Alexander - 2020 - The Pluralist 15 (1):1-16.
    growing up in new mexico, I was passionate about geology, specifically paleontology. It led, in one adventure, to me being arrested by monks. While on a picnic with my parents at Jemez Springs, I had followed a beautiful Permian stratum, rich with crinoids and brachiopod shells, onto private land owned by The Servants of the Paraclete, a retreat for "whiskey priests."1 I was detained while one brother admonished me, kindly, and let me go, and even let me keep my specimens. (...)
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  31.  15
    Dialogues on Values and Centers of Value: Old Friends, New Thoughts.Thomas M. Dicken & Rem Blanchard Edwards - 2001 - Amsterdam - New York: BRILL.
    This book features two old philosophical friends engaged in lively personal and intellectual conversations. Wary of any dogmatism, their dialogues explore the Big Bang and the joy of grandchildren, value theory and terrorism, God and art, metaphor and meaning, while assessing the thought of Robert S. Hartman, Alfred North Whitehead, Charles Hartshorne, H. Richard Niebuhr, and others.
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  32.  9
    1 Malebranche and Method.Thomas M. Lennon - 2000 - In Steven Nadler (ed.), The Cambridge companion to Malebranche. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 8.
  33. Public Justification, Inclusion, and Discursive Equality.Thomas M. Besch - 2018 - Dialogue 57 (3):591-614.
    The paper challenges the view that public justification sits well with emancipatory and egalitarian intuitions. I distinguish between the depth, scope and the purchase of the discursive standing that such justification allocates, and situate within this matrix Rawls’s view of public justification. A standard objection to this view is that public justification should be more inclusive in scope. This is both plausible and problematic in emancipatory and egalitarian terms. If inclusive public justification allocates discursive standing that is rich in purchase, (...)
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  34. Forst on Reciprocity of Reasons: a Critique.Thomas M. Besch - 2020 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 58 (3):357-382.
    According to Rainer Forst, (i) moral and political claims must meet a requirement of reciprocal and general acceptability (RGA) while (ii) we are under a duty in engaged discursive practice to justify such claims to others, or be able to do so, on grounds that meet RGA. The paper critically engages this view. I argue that Forst builds a key component of RGA, i.e., reciprocity of reasons, on an idea of the reasonable that undermines both (i) and (ii): if RGA (...)
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  35.  33
    Of Corporations, Courts, Personhood, and Morality.Margaret M. Blair - 2015 - Business Ethics Quarterly 25 (4):415-431.
    ABSTRACT:Since the dawn of capitalism, corporations have been regarded by the law as separate legal “persons.” Corporate “personhood” has nonetheless remained controversial, and our understanding of corporate personhood often influences our thinking about the social responsibilities of corporations. This essay, written in honor of Prof. Thomas Donaldson, explores the tension in recent decisions by the U.S. Supreme Court and the Delaware Chancery Court about what corporations are, whose interests they serve, and who gets to make decisions about what (...)
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  36.  63
    John Dewey and the Moral Imagination: Beyond Putnam and Rorty toward a Postmodern Ethics.Thomas M. Alexander - 1993 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 29 (3):369 - 400.
  37. Political liberalism, the internal conception, and the problem of public dogma.Thomas M. Besch - 2012 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 2 (1):153-177.
    According to the “internal” conception (Quong), political liberalism aims to be publicly justifiable only to people who are reasonable in a special sense specified and advocated by political liberalism itself. One advantage of the internal conception allegedly is that it enables liberalism to avoid perfectionism. The paper takes issue with this view. It argues that once the internal conception is duly pitched at its fundamental, metatheoretical level and placed in its proper discursive context, it emerges that it comes at the (...)
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  38. Introduction to Cultural domination: philosophical perspectives.Thomas M. Besch, Raphael Van Riel, Harold Kincaid & Tarun Menon - forthcoming - In Thomas M. Besch, Raphael Van Riel, Harold Kincaid & Tarun Menon (eds.), Cultural domination: philosophical perspectives. Routledge (expected 2024).
  39. On Political Legitimacy, Reasonableness, and Perfectionism.Thomas M. Besch - 2013 - Public Reason 5 (1):58-74.
    The paper advances a non-orthodox reading of political liberalism’s view of political legitimacy, the view of public political justification that comes with it, and the idea of the reasonable at the heart of these views. Political liberalism entails that full discursive standing should be accorded only to people who are reasonable in a substantive sense. As the paper argues, this renders political liberalism dogmatic and exclusivist at the level of arguments for or against normative theories of justice. Against that background, (...)
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  40. On Actualist and Fundamental Public Justification in Political Liberalism.Thomas M. Besch - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (5):1777-1799.
    Public justification in political liberalism is often conceptualized in light of Rawls’s view of its role in a hypothetical well-ordered society as an ideal or idealizing form of justification that applies a putatively reasonable conception of political justice to political matters. But Rawls implicates a different idea of public justification in his doctrine of general reflective equilibrium. The paper engages this second, more fundamental idea. Public justification in this second sense is actualist and fundamental. It is actualist in that it (...)
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  41.  26
    Linguistic Pragmatism and Cultural Naturalism: Noncognitive Experience, Culture, and the Human Eros.Thomas M. Alexander - 2014 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 6 (2).
    Contrary to some recent self-styled “linguistic pragmatists” who seek to dispense with the purportedly obsolete term “experience”. this essay attempts to show that pragmatism cannot cogently dispense with experience, understanding that term in its Deweyan sense as “culture” and not some sort of mentalistic perception or state. Focusing on Robert Brandom’s recent Perspectives on Pragmatism, I show how the very assumptions that Dewey meant to call into question with his “instrumentalist turn” in 1903 are enshrined in Brandom’s “new and improved” (...)
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  42. ‘Wholly Present’ Defined.Thomas M. Crisp & Donald P. Smith - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 71 (2):318–344.
    Three-dimensionalists , sometimes referred to as endurantists, think that objects persist through time by being “wholly present” at every time they exist. But what is it for something to be wholly present at a time? It is surprisingly difficult to say. The threedimensionalist is free, of course, to take ‘is wholly present at’ as one of her theory’s primitives, but this is problematic for at least one reason: some philosophers claim not to understand her primitive. Clearly the three-dimensionalist would be (...)
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  43. A dilemma for internalism?Thomas M. Crisp - 2010 - Synthese 174 (3):355-366.
    Internalism about epistemic justification (henceforth, ‘internalism’) says that a belief B is epistemically justified for S only if S is aware of some good-making feature of B, some feature that makes for B’s having positive epistemic status: e.g., evidence for B. Externalists with respect to epistemic justification (‘externalists’) deny this awareness requirement. Michael Bergmann has recently put this dilemma against internalism: awareness admits of a strong and a weak construal; given the strong construal, internalism is subject to debilitating regress troubles; (...)
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  44. Presentism, eternalism and relativity physics.Thomas M. Crisp - 2007 - In William Lane Craig & Quentin Smith (eds.), Einstein, Relativity and Absolute Simultaneity. Routledge. pp. 262-278.
  45.  97
    On domination: toward a status-centric view.Thomas M. Besch - manuscript
  46. Contractualism and utilitarianism.Thomas M. Scanlon - 1982 - In Amartya Kumar Sen & Bernard Arthur Owen Williams (eds.), Utilitarianism and Beyond. Cambridge University Press. pp. 103--128.
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  47. On believing that the scriptures are divinely inspired.Thomas M. Crisp - 2009 - In Oliver D. Crisp & Michael C. Rea (eds.), Analytic Theology: New Essays in the Philosophy of Theology. Oxford Up. pp. 187--213.
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  48. Factualism, Normativism and the Bounds of Normativity.Thomas M. Besch - 2011 - Dialogue 50 (2):347-365.
    The paper argues that applications of the principle that “ought” implies “can” (OIC) depend on normative considerations even if the link between “ought” and “can” is logical in nature. Thus, we should reject a common, “factualist” conception of OIC and endorse weak “normativism”. Even if we use OIC as the rule ““cannot” therefore “not ought””, applying OIC is not a mere matter of facts and logic, as factualists claim, but often draws on “proto-ideals” of moral agency.
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  49. On the Right to Justification and Discursive Respect.Thomas M. Besch - 2015 - Dialogue 54 (4):703-726.
    Rainer Forst’s constructivism argues that a right to justification provides a reasonably non-rejectable foundation of justice. With an exemplary focus on his attempt to ground human rights, I argue that this right cannot provide such a foundation. To accord to others such a right is to include them in the scope of discursive respect. But it is reasonably contested whether we should accord to others equal discursive respect. It follows that Forst’s constructivism cannot ground human rights, or justice, categorically. At (...)
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  50.  19
    Heraclitus.Thomas M. Robinson - 2021 - The Philosophers' Magazine 92:64-71.
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