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  1.  29
    Models of the relationship of the firm to society.Thomas F. McMahon - 1986 - Journal of Business Ethics 5 (3):181 - 191.
    Authors of books on business ethics and corporate social responsibility fall into two general approaches when they answer the question: Why should a business firm, which represents private property, have greater obligations to the local community than an ordinary citizen? Authors generally subscribe to a rights approach or to a power model. This paper will present four rights approaches and three power models which are used to describe the relationship of the firm to society. Introducing these different approaches and models (...)
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  2.  30
    The contributions of religious traditions to business ethics.Thomas F. McMahon - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (4):341 - 349.
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  3.  33
    Creed, cult, code and business ethics.Thomas F. McMahon - 1986 - Journal of Business Ethics 5 (6):453 - 463.
    What does religion contribute to business ethics? Related to the practical, religion applies theological concepts to business situations; namely, vocation, stewardship, human dignity, co-creation, co-conservation, sharing in God's power, servant leadership, encounter with the Incarnation, sacramental sign and justice (divine and human). These concepts suggest the threefold component of religion: doctrine (creed), worship (cult) and values governing behavior (code). A principle taken from religious practice illustrates its unique contribution to business ethics. The principle of proportionality (or double effect) exemplifies code (...)
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  4.  24
    Transforming Justice.Thomas F. McMahon - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (4):593-602.
    Rights, justice, and power raise many interesting questions. Why do such basic concepts as rights and justice have such differentpoints of concern—equality, proportionality, medium rei (moderation or the middle of the thing itself without reference to the person using it)? Why are there such different perspectives in philosophy, theology, and law? Why is the notion of power in business ethics so isolated from the general discussion of applied justice in treatises on business contracts, employee relations, and in other related topics? (...)
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  5.  15
    Transforming Justice.Thomas F. McMahon - 1999 - Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (4):593-602.
    Rights, justice, and power raise many interesting questions. Why do such basic concepts as rights and justice have such differentpoints of concern—equality, proportionality, medium rei? Why are there such different perspectives in philosophy, theology, and law? Why is the notion of power in business ethics so isolated from the general discussion of applied justice in treatises on business contracts, employee relations, and in other related topics? Discussions of power seemed parallel with discussions of justice. The two did not seem to (...)
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  6.  42
    Lifeboat Ethics in Business.Thomas F. McMahon - 2000 - Business Ethics Quarterly 10 (1):269-276.
    Lifeboat ethics is an anomalous concept that has been applied to many different situations, such as overpopulation. In thispresentation, Lifeboat Ethics is applied to plant closings (Darlington, Amoco/Neodesha, Chrysler/Kenosha) and downsizing (BP Amoco). The power of the decision maker—not the rights of the employees—determines who will remain, who will be forced overboard, and who will be invited in.
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  7.  63
    A Reaction to Vogel's.Thomas F. McMahon - 1991 - Business Ethics Quarterly 1 (2):211-222.
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  8. Socio-ethical issues: Two conceptual frameworks.Thomas F. McMahon - forthcoming - Profit and Responsibility: Issues in Business and Professional Ethics.
     
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  9.  5
    A Brief History of American Business Ethics.Thomas F. McMahon - 1999 - In Robert E. Frederick (ed.), A Companion to Business Ethics. Malden, Massachusetts, USA: Blackwell. pp. 342–352.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Origins and underlying ideologies 1700–1776 Earlier American business ethics 1777–1890 A mature American business ethics 1891–1963 The rise of social issues in business ethics 1962–1970 Business ethics as a specific discipline American business ethics as global Conclusion.
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  10.  26
    Classic cases - global disasters: Inquiries into management ethics.Thomas F. Mcmahon & Robert E. Allinson - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (1):99-104.
    This book review outlines and critiques Robert Allinson's book _Global Disasters: Inquiries into Management Ethics_ (New York: Prentice Hall, 1993). The reviewer first outlines the structure of the book and then moves on to discussing the main arguments of the book, including but not limited to the distinctions between "monocausality" and "multi-causality" and "scapegoating" and "multiple responsibility" that Allinson highlights. Central to Allinson's argument is the thesis that problems in management (and the disasters that often result from them) are conceptual (...)
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  11.  23
    From social irresponsibility to social responsiveness: The chrysler/kenosha plant closing. [REVIEW]Thomas F. McMahon - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 20 (2):101 - 111.
    In 1987, Chrysler bought American Motors which included a plant in Kenosha, Wisconsin, a city of 72 000. Employing 6 500 workers, most of whom were members of the United Auto Workers (UAW), Chrysler became the city's largest employer. For decades, the UAW had a strong influence on city politics. However, in the 1980s young professionals in Kenosha began challenging this status quo.Chrysler shocked the citizens of Kenosha when their executives announced the closing of their plant within a year. Wisconsin (...)
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  12.  20
    Classic Cases. [REVIEW]Thomas F. McMahon - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (1):99-104.
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