Results for 'Thomas E. Dickins'

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  1.  57
    The phylogeny and ontogeny of adaptations.E. Dickins Thomas - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):283-284.
    Locke & Bogin (L&B) rightly point to the absence of ontogeny in theories of language evolution. However, they overly rely upon ontogenetic data to isolate components of the language faculty. Only an adaptationist analysis, of the sort seen in evolutionary psychology, can carve language at its joints and lead to testable predictions about how language works.
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  2.  66
    Designed calibration: Naturally selected flexibility, not non-genetic inheritance.Thomas E. Dickins & Benjamin J. A. Dickins - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):368-369.
    Jablonka & Lamb (J&L) have presented a number of different possible mechanisms for finessing design. The extra-genetic nature of these mechanisms has led them to challenge orthodox neo-Darwinian views. However, these mechanisms are for calibration and have been designed by natural selection. As such, they add detail to our knowledge, but neo-Darwinism is sufficiently resourced to account for them.
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  3.  81
    Is empirical imagination a constraint on adaptationist theory construction?Thomas E. Dickins & David W. Dickins - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):515-516.
    Andrews et al. present a form of instrumental adaptationism that is designed to test the hypothesis that a given trait is an adaptation. This epistemological commitment aims to make clear statements about behavioural natural kinds. The instrumental logic is sound, but it is the limits of our empirical imagination that can cause problems for theory construction.
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  4.  16
    Data and Context.Thomas E. Dickins - 2021 - Biosemiotics 14 (3):633-642.
    Deacon presents a fascinating model that adds to explanations of the origins of life from physical matter. Deacon’s paper owes much to the work of Howard Pattee, who saw semiotic relations in informational terms, and Deacon binds his model to criticism of current information concepts in biology which he sees as semantically inadequate. In this commentary I first outline the broader project from Pattee, and then I present a cybernetic perspective on information. My claim is that this view of information (...)
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  5.  15
    Evolutionary accounts of human behavioural diversity introduction.Gillian R. Brown, Thomas E. Dickins, Rebecca Sear & Kevin N. Laland - 2011 - Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B 366 (156):313-324.
    Human beings persist in an extraordinary range of ecological settings, in the process exhibiting enormous behavioural diversity, both within and between populations. People vary in their social, mating and parental behaviour and have diverse and elaborate beliefs, traditions, norms and institutions. The aim of this theme issue is to ask whether, and how, evolutionary theory can help us to understand this diversity. In this introductory article, we provide a background to the debate surrounding how best to understand behavioural diversity using (...)
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  6. Social constructionism as cognitive science.Thomas E. Dickins - 2004 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 34 (4):333–352.
    Social constructionism is a broad position that emphasizes the importance of human social processes in psychology. These processes are generally associated with language and the ability to construct stories that conform to the emergent rules of "language games". This view allows one to espouse a variety of critical postures with regard to realist commitments within the social and behavioural sciences, ranging from outright relativism to a more moderate respect for the "barrier" that linguistic descriptions can place between us and reality. (...)
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  7.  10
    The Role of Information in Evolutionary Biology.Thomas E. Dickins - 2023 - Acta Biotheoretica 71 (3).
    The Modern Synthesis has received criticism for its purported gene-centrism. That criticism relies on a concept of the gene as a unit of instructional information. In this paper I discuss information concepts and endorse one, developed from Floridi, that sees information as a functional relationship between data and context. I use this concept to inspect developmental criticisms of the Modern Synthesis and argue that the instructional gene arose as an idealization practice when evolutionary biologists made comment on development. However, a (...)
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  8.  72
    Can there ever be a non-specific adaptation? A response to Simon J. Hampton.Thomas E. Dickins - 2005 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 35 (3):329–340.
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  9.  11
    Lessons from behaviorism: The problem of construct-led science.Thomas E. Dickins & Qazi Rahman - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45.
    Yarkoni makes a number of valid points in his critical analysis of psychology, but he misses an opportunity to expose the root of its problems. That root is the poor practice around the derivation of explanatory constructs. We make comment on this with an example from behaviorist history and relate this to the recent discussion of scientific understanding in the philosophy of science.
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  10.  83
    On sociosexual cognitive architecture.Thomas E. Dickins - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):280-281.
    Schmitt has equivocated about the underlying psychology of sociosexuality, but from the data presented in the target article, it would appear that he has drawn out the underlying cognitive architecture. In this commentary, I describe this architecture and discuss two emerging hypotheses about heterosexual and homosexual male sociosexuality.
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  11.  17
    Possible phylogenies: The role of hypotheses, weak inferences, and falsification.Thomas E. Dickins - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):219-220.
    This commentary takes issue with Corballis's claim to have presented a falsifiable hypothesis. It argues that Corballis has instead presented a framework of weak inferences that, although unfalsifiable, might help to constrain future theory-building.
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  12.  30
    Suicide terrorism and post-mortem benefits.Jacqueline M. Gray & Thomas E. Dickins - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (4):369-370.
  13.  14
    Measuring heritability: Why bother?David M. Shuker & Thomas E. Dickins - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45:e175.
    Uchiyama et al. rightly consider how cultural variation may influence estimates of heritability by contributing to environmental sources of variation. We disagree, however, with the idea that generalisable estimates of heritability are ever a plausible aim. Heritability estimates are always context-specific, and to suggest otherwise is to misunderstand what heritability can and cannot tell us.
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  14.  2
    A not-so proximate account of cleansing behavior.Jonathan Sigger & Thomas E. Dickins - 2021 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 44:e24.
    In this commentary we outline perceptual control theory and suggest this as a fruitful way for Lee and Schwarz (L&S) to fully embody their account of cleansing behavior. Moreover, we take issue with the command control approach that L&S have taken seeing this as an unnecessary cognitive commitment within an embodied model of cleansing behavior.
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  15.  12
    Group-level traits can be studied with standard evolutionary theory.Thomas C. Scott-Phillips & Thomas E. Dickins - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (3):273-274.
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  16.  48
    The generation game is the cooperation game: The role of grandparents in the timing of reproduction.Rebecca Sear & Thomas E. Dickins - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (1):34-35.
    Coall & Hertwig (C&H) demonstrate the importance of grandparents to children, even in low fertility societies. We suggest policy-makers interested in reproductive timing in such contexts should be alerted to the practical applications of this cooperative breeding framework. The presence or absence of a supportive kin network could help explain why some women begin their reproductive careers or.
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  17.  72
    The niche construction perspective: a critical appraisal.Thomas C. Scott-Phillips, Kevin N. Laland, David M. Shuker, Thomas E. Dickins & Stuart A. West - unknown
    Niche construction refers to the activities of organisms that bring about changes in their environments, many of which are evolutionarily and ecologically consequential. Advocates of niche construction theory (NCT) believe that standard evolutionary theory fails to recognize the full importance of niche construction, and consequently propose a novel view of evolution, in which niche construction and its legacy over time (ecological inheritance) are described as evolutionary processes, equivalent in importance to natural selection. Here, we subject NCT to critical evaluation, in (...)
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  18.  29
    General intelligence does not help us understand cognitive evolution.David M. Shuker, Louise Barrett, Thomas E. Dickins, Thom C. Scott-Phillips & Robert A. Barton - 2017 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 40.
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  19.  38
    Synthesis in the human evolutionary behavioural sciences.Rebecca Sear, David W. Lawson & Thomas E. Dickins - unknown
    Over the last three decades, the application of evolutionary theory to the human sciences has shown remarkable growth. This growth has also been characterised by a ‘splitting’ process, with the emergence of distinct sub-disciplines, most notably: Human Behavioural Ecology (HBE), Evolutionary Psychology (EP) and studies of Cultural Evolution (CE). Multiple applications of evolutionary ideas to the human sciences are undoubtedly a good thing, demonstrating the usefulness of this approach to human affairs. Nevertheless, this fracture has been associated with considerable tension, (...)
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  20.  8
    Big ideas for little kids: teaching philosophy through children's literature.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2014 - Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Big Ideas for Little Kids includes everything a teacher, a parent, or a college student needs to teach philosophy to elementary school children from picture books. Written in a clear and accessible style, the book explains why it is important to allow young children access to philosophy during primary-school education. Wartenberg also gives advice on how to construct a "learner-centered" classroom, in which children discuss philosophical issues with one another as they respond to open-ended questions by saying whether they agree (...)
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  21. Human welfare and moral worth: Kantian perspectives.Thomas E. Hill - 2002 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Thomas Hill, a leading figure in the recent development of Kantian moral philosophy, presents a set of essays exploring the implications of basic Kantian ideas for practical issues. The first part of the book provides background in central themes in Kant's ethics; the second part discusses questions regarding human welfare; the third focuses on moral worth-the nature and grounds of moral assessment of persons as deserving esteem or blame. Hill shows moral, political, and social philosophers just how valuable moral (...)
  22. The importance of autonomy.Thomas E. Hill - 1987 - In Diana T. Meyers (ed.), Women and Moral Theory. Totowa, N.J.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. pp. 129--138.
  23. Respect, pluralism, and justice: Kantian perspectives.Thomas E. Hill - 1995 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Respect, Pluralism, and Justice is a series of essays which sketches a broadly Kantian framework for moral deliberation, and then uses it to address important social and political issues. Hill shows how Kantian theory can be developed to deal with questions about cultural diversity, punishment, political violence, responsibility for the consequences of wrongdoing, and state coercion in a pluralistic society.
  24. Dignity and practical reason in Kant's moral theory.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - Ithaca: Cornell University Press.
  25. Autonomy and self-respect.Thomas E. Hill - 1991 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    This stimulating collection of essays in ethics eschews the simple exposition and refinement of abstract theories. Rather, the author focuses on everyday moral issues, often neglected by philosophers, and explores the deeper theoretical questions which they raise. Such issues are: Is it wrong to tell a lie to protect someone from a painful truth? Should one commit a lesser evil to prevent another from doing something worse? Can one be both autonomous and compassionate? Other topics discussed are servility, weakness of (...)
  26. Evolutionary Biology: Contemporary and Historical Reflections Upon Core Theory.T. E. Dickins & B. J. Dickins (eds.) - 2023 - Springer.
     
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  27.  85
    The nature of art: an anthology.Thomas E. Wartenberg (ed.) - 2002 - Fort Worth: Harcourt College.
    THE NATURE OF ART is a collection of 29 seminal, historically-organized readings that are focused on a basic philosophical question: What is Art? Including writings from the Western tradition'both Continental and Analytic traditions'as well as non-Western, minority, and feminist writings, this volume provides students with a rich set of resources to explore this matter both broadly and deeply. Introductions to each reading situate the selection amidst each respective thinker's body of work and the greater philosophical context in which the remarks (...)
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  28.  25
    7 Reason and the practice of science.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 1992 - In Paul Guyer (ed.), The Cambridge companion to Kant. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 3--228.
  29. Heidegger.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2000 - In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
     
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  30.  35
    Analyses do not support the parasite-stress theory of human sociality.Thomas E. Currie & Ruth Mace - 2012 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (2):83-85.
    Re-analysis of the data provided in the target article reveals a lack of evidence for a strong, universal relationship between parasite stress and the variables relating to sociality. Furthermore, even if associations between these variables do exist, the analyses presented here do not provide evidence for Fincher & Thornhill's (F&T's) proposed causal mechanism.
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  31.  10
    First principles: what America's founders learned from the Greeks and Romans and how that shaped our country.Thomas E. Ricks - 2020 - New York, NY: Harper, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers.
    Examines how the educations of America's first four presidents, and in particular their scholarly devotion to ancient Greek and Roman classics, informed the beliefs and ideals that shaped the nation's constitution and government.
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  32.  52
    Caring about morality: philosophical perspectives in moral psychology.Thomas E. Wren - 1991 - Cambridge: MIT Press.
    In this book Thomas Wren uncovers and assesses the largely hidden philosophical assumptions about human motivation that have shaped contemporary psychological ...
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  33. Autonomy of Moral Agents.Thomas E. Hill - 1992 - In Lawrence C. Becker & Charlotte B. Becker (eds.), Encyclopedia of ethics. New York: Routledge.
     
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  34.  2
    Emily's Art.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 71–80.
    This chapter talks about Peter Catalanotto's delightfully illustrated picture book, Emily's Art. Traditionally, the philosophy of art was also called aesthetics, a term derived from the ancient Greek. There are many intriguing issues in the philosophy of art. For example, philosophers have proposed various different solutions to the question of what art is. Art is a subject that interests children because they often are engaged in producing it. So an interesting way to begin a discussion of issues in the philosophy (...)
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  35.  5
    Frederick.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 109–115.
    Leo Lionni's charming tale of a mouse, eponymously named Frederick, raises very important questions about the nature of work, a topic addressed in the field of social and political philosophy. A question — one that the mice themselves raise — is whether Frederick is doing work when he gathers the sun, colors, and words. Since the book has used the word “gather” as its way of conceptualizing work, it might seem that Frederick is working, for he, too, is also gathering (...)
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  36.  5
    Harold and the Purple Crayon.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 7–15.
    This chapter talks about a picture of Crockett Johnson's book, Harold and the Purple Crayon, where Harold, a young toddler, standing with his body facing to our left but with his head turned slightly to the right. When we see Harold making a drawing with his purple crayon in an illustration by Crocker Johnson, we are witnessing the workings of Harold's imagination. Because of the peculiar metaphysics of his world, objects solve his problems when they morph from drawings into real (...)
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  37.  2
    Knuffle Bunny.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 42–47.
    This chapter highlights different ways in which people communicate with one another. Although language is clearly a crucial means of communication, there are many other things that we can do to convey a message to someone. The chapter presents a story of in which Trixie had difficulty communicating to her father that they had left Knuffle Bunny at the Laundromat. Philosophers from earlier centuries would have viewed Trixie's difficulty as stemming from her attaching the wrong sounds (words?) to the ideas (...)
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  38.  1
    Let's Do Nothing!Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 33–41.
    This chapter talks about Tony Fucile's amusing book, Let's Do Nothing!. This book straddles the boundary between metaphysics and the philosophy of language, for the concept of nothing has been a very puzzling one to philosophers. But before entering those murky waters, let's see how Sal and Frankie fare in their attempt to do nothing. Sal and Frankie were trapped in their own fly bottle when they tried to do nothing. Sal's discovery — that you can't do nothing — was (...)
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  39.  2
    Many Moons.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 48–54.
    The theory of knowledge attempts to explain the nature and extent of human knowledge. A good place to begin the discussion on this theory is with the Princess Lenore's beliefs about the moon in Many Moons, a children's story on the different conceptions of knowledge. The story raises important questions about the nature of knowledge and those who claim to have it. We can understand the philosophical point that Many Moons makes about knowledge ask why the Jester is able to (...)
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  40.  4
    Miss Nelson Is Missing!Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 81–89.
    Harry Allard's very engaging and popular picture book Miss Nelson Is Missing! raises an important ethical issue. The issue is whether it is morally permissible to adopt an immoral means if doing so promotes a morally good end. The book shows us how successful deceptive behavior can be and also provides with an opportunity for reflecting on why such behavior is morally wrong. So there is a lesson to be learned about the importance of approaching children's picture books armed with (...)
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  41.  1
    Morris the Moose.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 63–70.
    People could have mistaken beliefs that they arrive at by faulty reasoning. B.Wiseman's delightful book, Morris the Moose, takes a more detailed look at such reasoning, itself the subject of philosophical logic. Morris explains to the cow why she must be a moose. He draws a false conclusion from true premises: that the cow has four legs, a tail, and horns. His problem could have been remedied by paying more attention to logic. Morris appeals to something like the following principle: (...)
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  42. Next Steps.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 160–162.
    This chapter discusses Arnold Lobel's story “Cookies,” a story about will‐power, a concept central to moral psychology. The question of whether Frog and Toad both, or one or neither, possess will‐power at the end of the story is a good one to begin a discussion of this interesting philosophical topic with children. The concept of will‐power is linked to an important philosophical concept, weakness of the will. The Greek philosopher Aristotle first identified this phenomenon. This area of philosophical investigation bridges (...)
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  43.  4
    Shrek!Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 24–32.
    Shrek! focuses on an issue in the philosophy of language, a relatively new area of philosophical investigation that first emerged during the twentieth century. Some philosophers disagree with the claim that you cannot separate the descriptive and evaluative elements of linguistic statements. This is because they take descriptive statements to be the basic elements of language, to which our subjective attitudes get attached later in a contingent manner. At its most basic level language presents a symbolic picture of facts in (...)
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  44.  2
    The Big Orange Splot.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 132–141.
    In Daniel Manus Pinkwater's quirkily illustrated book, The Big Orange Splot, a strange accident leads a man to change his life. The book presents an important claim that the existentialists and other philosophers have embraced: That the life of conformity is one that people ought to avoid, despite its attractiveness. Instead of living a life just like everyone else and fulfilling expectations that others have for us, our lives should resemble the transformed facades of all the homes on Mr. Plumbean's (...)
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  45.  5
    The Giving Tree.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 90–99.
    The chapter talks about Shel Silverstein's The Giving Tree, which is a favorite of many children, adults, and teachers. The story of a relationship between a boy and a tree is charming for, despite the vicissitudes of the relationship, the two end up together at the end, with the boy — now an old man — sitting contentedly on the tree — itself reduced to a mere stump. The book raises an important issue in the field of environmental ethics. It (...)
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  46.  8
    The Important Book.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 16–23.
    Margaret Wise Brown's The Important Book, which is a childrens' picture book, provides an excellent opportunity to discuss metaphysics. The book opens up for our reflection the viability of a certain metaphysical account of the nature of objects. In making a distinction between the important feature or property of an object and all the others that it simply is or has, The Important Book operates with the assumption that all objects have what metaphysicians call an essential property. As the book (...)
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  47.  5
    The Paper Bag Princess.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 125–131.
    Robert Mursch's picture book, The Paper Bag Princess, inverts many of the gender roles traditionally found in fairy tales: It's a prince (Roland) who gets abducted in this story, not a princess, though it's the princess (Elizabeth) who must come to the rescue and save him. Although these reversals are a source of the book's humor, they also underscore claims made in feminist philosophy, the specific branch of social and political philosophy considered in this chapter. Feminist philosophers and literary scholars (...)
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  48.  5
    The Sneetches.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 116–124.
    The Sneetches by Theodor Geisel (otherwise known as Dr Seuss) is a satirical story that targets illicit discrimination. The book presents its parable about discrimination by depicting a society in which one group discriminates against another group because of an easily perceptible difference between them. The real irrationality of discrimination in both The Sneetches and real life is that it is based on the false claim that members of the discriminated‐against group are inferior to members of the discriminating group. The (...)
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  49.  1
    Why? Why? Why?Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 1–6.
    The prelims comprise: Half‐Title Page Title Page Copyright Page Dedication Page Table of Contents Acknowledgments.
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  50.  4
    Yellow and Pink.Thomas E. Wartenberg - 2013 - In A Sneetch Is a Sneetch and Other Philosophical Discoveries. Oxford, UK: Wiley‐Blackwell. pp. 55–62.
    In William Steig's inventive book, Yellow and Pink, the debate is played out through a dialogue between two painted wooden puppets. In the book, Yellow (the yellow‐colored puppet) is skeptical of the existence of a God‐like creator. Pink represents the traditional theist, someone who believes in the existence of God. Yellow narrates how he and Pink could have come into being through a series of coincidences. According to Darwin's theory, mutations are selected for in evolution, with the result that a (...)
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