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  1.  23
    Isolated Environmental Cues and Product Efficacy Penalties: The Color Green and Eco-Labels.Ethan Pancer, Lindsay McShane & Theodore J. Noseworthy - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):159-177.
    The current work examines how cues traditionally used to signal environmental friendliness, specifically the color green and eco-labels, and influence product efficacy perceptions and subsequent purchase intentions. Across three experiments, we find that environmental cues used in isolation reduce perceptions of product efficacy. We argue that this efficacy discounting effect occurs because the isolated use of an environmental cue introduces category ambiguity by activating competing functionality and environmentally friendly schemas during evaluation. We discuss the implications of our findings for research (...)
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  2.  17
    If You Can’T See the Forest for the Trees, You Might Just Cut Down the Forest: The Perils of Forced Choice on “Seemingly” Unethical Decision-Making.Michael O. Wood, Theodore J. Noseworthy & Scott R. Colwell - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):515-527.
    Why do otherwise well-intentioned managers make decisions that have negative social or environmental consequences? To answer this question, the authors combine the literature on construal level theory with the compromise effect to explore the circumstances that lead to seemingly unethical decision-making. The results of two studies suggest that the degree to which managers make high-risk tradeoffs is highly influenced by how they mentally represent the decision context. The authors find that managers are more likely to make seemingly unethical tradeoffs when (...)
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  3.  17
    When We Confuse Market Economics as Market Ethics: Evidence From an Event Study.Scott R. Colwell & Theodore J. Noseworthy - 2009 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 20:17-22.
    While evidence exists suggesting that irresponsible corporate behaviour may lead to decreased shareholder wealth (Frooman 1997), one cannot help but question the generalizability of these results when companies such as Exxon, an organization well known for its environmental problems, remains at the top of the 2006 Fortune 500 list. In this paper we show with regards to news of irresponsible behaviour, the market punishes smaller, less capitalized firms but not necessarily the very large and highly capitalized companies.
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