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  1.  69
    A dynamic developmental theory of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) predominantly hyperactive/impulsive and combined subtypes.Terje Sagvolden, Espen Borgå Johansen, Heidi Aase & Vivienne Ann Russell - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):397-419.
    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is currently defined as a cognitive/behavioral developmental disorder where all clinical criteria are behavioral. Inattentiveness, overactivity, and impulsiveness are presently regarded as the main clinical symptoms. The dynamic developmental behavioral theory is based on the hypothesis that altered dopaminergic function plays a pivotal role by failing to modulate nondopaminergic (primarily glutamate and GABA) signal transmission appropriately. A hypofunctioning mesolimbic dopamine branch produces altered reinforcement of behavior and deficient extinction of previously reinforced behavior. This gives rise to delay (...)
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  2.  58
    The dynamic developmental theory of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): Present status and future perspectives.Espen Borgå Johansen, Terje Sagvolden, Heidi Aase & Vivienne Ann Russell - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):451-454.
    The dynamic developmental theory (DDT) has benefited from the insights of the commentators, particularly in terms of the implications for the proposed steepened delay gradients in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The introduction of modified memory processes as a basis for the delay gradients improved the links to aspects of ADHD. However, it remains unclear whether the hyperactive-impulsive and inattentive subtypes are separate subgroups or may be explained as different outcomes of the same genetic factors and thus explicable by the same principles. (...)
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    Killeen's theory provides an answer – and a question.Mary Ann Metzger & Terje Sagvolden - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (1):144-145.