Results for 'Technological Unemployment'

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  1.  34
    Technological Unemployment, Meaning in Life, Purpose of Business, and the Future of Stakeholders.Tae Wan Kim & Alan Scheller-Wolf - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 160 (2):319-337.
    We offer a precautionary account of why business managers should proactively rethink about what kinds of automation firms ought to implement, by exploring two challenges that automation will potentially pose. We engage the current debate concerning whether life without work opportunities will incur a meaning crisis, offering an argument in favor of the position that if technological unemployment occurs, the machine age may be a structurally limited condition for many without work opportunities to have or add meaning to (...)
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  2.  45
    Massive Technological Unemployment Without Redistribution: A Case for Cautious Optimism.Bartek Chomanski - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (5):1389-1407.
    This paper argues that even though massive technological unemployment will likely be one of the results of automation, we will not need to institute mass-scale redistribution of wealth to deal with its consequences. Instead, reasons are given for cautious optimism about the standards of living the newly unemployed workers may expect in the fully-automated future. It is not claimed that these predictions will certainly bear out. Rather, they are no less likely to come to fruition than the predictions (...)
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  3.  71
    Technological Unemployment and Human Disenhancement.Michele Loi - 2015 - Ethics and Information Technology 17 (3):201-210.
    This paper discusses the concept of “human disenhancement”, i.e. the worsening of human individual abilities and expectations through technology. The goal is provoking ethical reflection on technological innovation outside the biomedical realm, in particular the substitution of human work with computer-driven automation. According to some widely accepted economic theories, automatization and computerization are responsible for the disappearance of many middle-class jobs. I argue that, if that is the case, a technological innovation can be a cause of “human disenhancement”, (...)
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  4.  62
    Technological Unemployment, Leisure Occupation, and the Human Project.Luciano Floridi - 2014 - Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):143-150.
    In 1930, John Maynard Keynes published a masterpiece that should be a compulsory reading for any educated person, a short essay entitled Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren (Keynes 1930, 1972).All references are from the 1931 online version of Keynes (1930) provided by Project Gutenberg, so pages are left unspecified. I am sure Keynes would have found such free access to information coherent with the philosophy of the essay. It was an attempt to see what life would be like if peace, (...)
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  5. Will Life Be Worth Living in a World Without Work? Technological Unemployment and the Meaning of Life.John Danaher - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):41-64.
    Suppose we are about to enter an era of increasing technological unemployment. What implications does this have for society? Two distinct ethical/social issues would seem to arise. The first is one of distributive justice: how will the efficiency gains from automated labour be distributed through society? The second is one of personal fulfillment and meaning: if people no longer have to work, what will they do with their lives? In this article, I set aside the first issue and (...)
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  6. Sex Work, Technological Unemployment and the Basic Income Guarantee.John Danaher - 2014 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 24 (1):113-130.
    Is sex work (specifically, prostitution) vulnerable to technological unemployment? Several authors have argued that it is. They claim that the advent of sophisticated sexual robots will lead to the displacement of human prostitutes, just as, say, the advent of sophisticated manufacturing robots have displaced many traditional forms of factory labour. But are they right? In this article, I critically assess the argument that has been made in favour of this displacement hypothesis. Although I grant the argument a degree (...)
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  7.  63
    Technological Unemployment.Magdalena Klimczuk-Kochańska & Andrzej Klimczuk - 2015 - In Mehmet Odekon (ed.), The Sage Encyclopedia of World Poverty, 2nd Edition. Sage Publications. pp. 1510--1511.
    Technological unemployment is a situation when people are without work and seeking work because of innovative production processes and labor-saving organizational solutions.
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  8.  18
    Technological Unemployment and the Lifestyle Question a Practical Proposal.Anthony Weston - 1985 - Journal of Social Philosophy 16 (2):19-30.
  9. Are Technological Unemployment and a Basoc Income Guarantee Inevitable or Desirable?James J. Hughes - 2014 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 24 (1):1-4.
    Robotics and artificial intelligence are beginning to fundamentally change the relative profitability and productivity of investments in capital versus human labor; creating technological unemployment at all levels of the workforce; from the North to the developing world. As robotics and expert systems become cheaper and more capable the percentage of the population that can find employment will also fall; stressing economies already trying to curtail "entitlements" and adopt austerity. Two additional technology-driven trends will exacerbate the structural unemployment (...)
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  10. Building a Postwork Utopia: Technological Unemployment, Life Extension and the Future of Human Flourishing.John Danaher - 2017 - In Kevin Lagrandeur & James Hughes (eds.), Surviving the Machine Age. Palgrave-MacMillan. pp. 63-82.
    Populations in developed societies are rapidly aging: fertility rates are at all-time lows while life expectancy creeps ever higher. This is triggering a social crisis in which shrinking youth populations are required to pay for the care and retirements of an aging majority. Some people argue that by investing in the right kinds of lifespan extension technology – the kind that extends the healthy and productive phases of life – we can avoid this crisis (thereby securing a ‘longevity dividend’). This (...)
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  11. Preventing Technological Unemployment by Widening Our Understanding of Capital and Progress: Making Robots Work for Us.C. W. M. Naastepad & Christopher Houghton Budd - 2019 - Ethics and Social Welfare 13 (2):115-132.
  12. BIG and Technological Unemployment: Chicken Litter Versus the Economists.Mark Walker - 2014 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 24 (1):5-25.
    The paper rehearses arguments for and against the prediction of massive technological unemployment. The main argument in favor is that robots are entering a large number of industries; making more expensive human labor redundant. The main argument against the prediction is that for two hundred years we have seen a massive increase in productivity with no long term structural unemployment caused by automation. The paper attempts to move past this argumentative impasse by asking what humans contribute to (...)
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  13.  15
    Beyond Technological Unemployment: The Future of Work.Michael A. Peters - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 52 (5):485-491.
    Volume 52, Issue 5, May 2020, Page 485-491.
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  14. Machines and Technological Unemployment: Basic Income Vs. Basic Capital.Elias Moser - forthcoming - In Steven John Thompson (ed.), Machine Law, Ethics, and Morality in the Age of Artificial Intelligence. Hershey: IGI Global. pp. 205-225.
    Recently, economic studies on labor market developments have indicated that there is a potential threat of technological mass unemployment. Both smart robotics and information technology may perform a broad range of tasks that today are fulfilled by human labor. This development could lead to vast inequalities. Proponents of an unconditional basic income have, therefore, employed this scenario to argue for their cause. In this chapter, the author argues that, although a basic income might be a valid answer to (...)
     
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  15.  19
    The Curious Promise of Educationalising Technological Unemployment: What Can Places of Learning Really Do About the Future of Work?Michael A. Peters, Petar Jandrić & Sarah Hayes - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (3):242-254.
    University education is full of promise. Indeed universities have the capacity to create and shape, through staff and students, all kinds of enthralling ‘worlds’ and ‘new possibilities of life’. Yet students are encouraged increasingly to view universities as simply a means to an end, where neoliberal education delivers flexible skills to directly serve a certain type of capitalism. Additionally, the universal challenge of technological unemployment, alongside numerous other social issues, has become educationalised and portrayed in HE policy, as (...)
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  16.  35
    Still Think Robots Can't Do Your Job? Essays on Automation and Technological Unemployment.Sergio Bellucci - 2019 - Ethics and Social Welfare 13 (1):93-95.
  17. The Problem of Verifying the Theory of Technological Unemployment.Alfred Kaehler - forthcoming - Social Research: An International Quarterly.
     
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  18.  7
    Inventing Ourselves Out of Jobs? America’s Debate Over Technological Unemployment, 1929–1981. [REVIEW]David Noble - 2003 - Isis 94:701-702.
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  19.  3
    Amy Sue Bix. Inventing Ourselves Out of Jobs? America’s Debate Over Technological Unemployment, 1929–1981. Xii+376 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000. $45. [REVIEW]David W. Noble - 2003 - Isis 94 (4):701-702.
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  20.  16
    Healing the Ills of Unemployment, Societal Breakdown, and Ecological Degradation: Gandhi’s Vision for a Sustainable Way of Life.Bart Gruzalski - 1994 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (3):22-27.
    In this paper I describe Gandhi’s vision for a way of life that would be an essential part of any sustainable solution to worldwide problems of unemployment, societal breakdown and ecological degradation. Gandhi’s vision included a communitarian lifestyle of simplicity and non-accumulation in which agriculture would be supported by cottage industries using appropriate technologies. Assuming obligations to future generations, Gandhi’s proposal highlights the degree to which our First-World lifestyle is morally impermissible. One objection to this criticism of our First-World (...)
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  21. Increasing Earnings Inequality and Unemployment in Developed Countries: Markets, Institutions, and the “Unified Theory”.David R. Howell - 2002 - Politics and Society 30 (2):193-243.
    It is widely accepted that global forces of technology and trade have caused a profound shift in labor demand toward the most highly skilled, generating sharply rising earnings inequality in flexible labor markets and persistently high unemployment in rigid labor markets. This article critically assesses the evidence for this “Unified Theory.” It finds little compelling empirical support for either the skill-biased demand-shift explanation for high U.S. earnings inequality or the rigid labor markets explanation for high unemployment in Europe. (...)
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  22.  52
    Technology as Enabler of the Automation of Work? Current Societal Challenges for a Future Perspective of Work.António Moniz, Bettina-Johanna Krings & Philipp Frey - 2021 - Revista Brasileira de Sociologia 9:206-229.
    Due to the innovative possibilities of digital technologies, the issue of increasing automation is once again on the agenda – and not only in the industry, but also in other branches and sectors of contemporary societies. Although public and scientific discussions about automation seem to raise relevant questions of the “old” debate, such as the replacement of human labor by introducing new technologies, the authors focus here on the new contextual quality of these questions. The debate should rethink the relationship (...)
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  23.  9
    Technology.R. D. Parslow - 1982 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 12 (3):26-32.
    "Short-term unemployment trends are likely... But far more critical are the long-term dangers of drastic population bipolarization. This would appear to generate a small minority of technologically oriented elitists against a vast majority of unskilled, nearly unemployable workers. This event, predicted by some and doubted by others, would probably represent the end of the road for contemporary Western civilization as now understood".
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  24. The Cultural Fix: An Anthropological Contribution to Science and Technology Studies.Linda L. Layne - 2000 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 25 (4):492-519.
    Since at least the 1960s, science and technology studies scholars have distinguished between technological and social fixes. The author introduces a new concept for the STS theoretical tool kit—the cultural fix—and illustrates this concept using examples from her own research on pregnancy loss and neonatal intensive care, as well as that of anthropologists Katherine Newman and Sherry Ortner on downward mobility and unemployment in the United States. It is argued that the cultural fix represents a distinctive anthropological contribution (...)
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  25.  38
    The Human Project.Luciano Floridi - 2014 - The Philosophers' Magazine 66:20-22.
    This article explores what technological unemployment might mean.
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  26.  45
    The Gandhian Approach to Swadeshi or Appropriate Technology: A Conceptualization in Terms of Basic Needs and Equity.J. I. Bakker - 1990 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 3 (1):50-88.
    This is an examination of the significance of Gandhi's social philosophy for development. It is argued that, when seen in light of Gandhi's social philosophy, the concepts of appropriate technology and basic needs take on new meaning. The Gandhian approach can be identified with theoriginal "basic needs" strategy for international development. Gandhi's approach helps to provide greater equity, or "distributive justice," by promoting technology that is appropriate to "basic needs". Gandhi's social philosophy has been neglected by most development specialists, with (...)
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  27.  8
    The Gandhian Approach to Swadeshi or Appropriate Technology: A Conceptualization in Terms of Basic Needs and Equity.Johannes Bakker - 1990 - Journal of Agricultural Ethics 3 (1):50-88.
    This is an examination of the significance of Gandhi's social philosophy for development. It is argued that, when seen in light of Gandhi's social philosophy, the concepts of appropriate technology and basic needs take on new meaning. The Gandhian approach can be identified with theoriginal "basic needs" strategy for international development. Gandhi's approach helps to provide greater equity, or "distributive justice," by promoting technology that is appropriate to "basic needs". Gandhi's social philosophy has been neglected by most development specialists, with (...)
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  28. The Cultural Fix: An Anthropological Contribution to Science and Technology Studies.Linda L. Layne - 2000 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 25 (3):352-379.
    Since at least the 1960s, science and technology studies scholars have distinguished between technological and social fixes. The author introduces a new concept for the STS theoretical tool kit—the cultural fix—and illustrates this concept using examples from her own research on pregnancy loss and neonatal intensive care, as well as that of anthropologists Katherine Newman and Sherry Ortner on downward mobility and unemployment in the United States. It is argued that the cultural fix represents a distinctive anthropological contribution (...)
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  29. In Defense of the Post-Work Future: Withdrawal and the Ludic Life.John Danaher - forthcoming - In Michael Cholbi & Michael Weber (eds.), The Future of Work, Technology, and Basic Income. New York: Routledge. pp. 99-116.
    A basic income might be able to correct for the income related losses of unemployment, but what about the meaning/purpose related losses? For better or worse, many people derive meaning and fulfillment from the jobs they do; if their jobs are taken away, they lose this source of meaning. If we are about the enter an era of rampant job loss as a result of advances in technology, is there a danger that it will also be an era of (...)
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  30. Microelectronics and Workers' Rights.Edmund Byrne - 1986 - In Carl Mitcham (ed.), Philosophy and Technology 11, Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science. Dordrecht/Boston: D. Reidel. pp. 205-216.
    A description of how microelectronics and robotics are tending to increase unemployment, followed by comparisons between the social policies of Western European countries and the United States with reard to this problem. A conclusion points out the need for a social philosophy of technology that acknowledges workers' rights.
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  31.  28
    A Strategic Opening for a Basic Income Guarantee in the Global Crisis Being Created by AI, Robots, Desktop Manufacturing and BioMedicine.James J. Hughes - 2014 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 24 (1):45-61.
    Robotics and artificial intelligence are beginning to fundamentally change the relative profitability and productivity of investments in capital versus human labor; creating technological unemployment at all levels of the workforce; from the North to the developing world. As robotics and expert systems become cheaper and more capable the percentage of the population that can find employment will also fall; stressing economies already trying to curtail "entitlements" and adopt austerity. Two additional technology-driven trends will exacerbate the structural unemployment (...)
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  32. Robots and Us: Towards an Economics of the ‘Good Life’.C. W. M. Naastepad & Jesse M. Mulder - 2018 - Review of Social Economy:1-33.
    (Expected) adverse effects of the ‘ICT Revolution’ on work and opportunities for individuals to use and develop their capacities give a new impetus to the debate on the societal implications of technology and raise questions regarding the ‘responsibility’ of research and innovation (RRI) and the possibility of achieving ‘inclusive and sustainable society’. However, missing in this debate is an examination of a possible conflict between the quest for ‘inclusive and sustainable society’ and conventional economic principles guiding capital allocation (including the (...)
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  33. The Rise of Artificial Intelligence and the Crisis of Moral Passivity.Berman Chan - 2020 - AI and Society 35 (4):991-993.
    Set aside fanciful doomsday speculations about AI. Even lower-level AIs, while otherwise friendly and providing us a universal basic income, would be able to do all our jobs. Also, we would over-rely upon AI assistants even in our personal lives. Thus, John Danaher argues that a human crisis of moral passivity would result However, I argue firstly that if AIs are posited to lack the potential to become unfriendly, they may not be intelligent enough to replace us in all our (...)
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  34.  11
    Становлення Концепції Розвитку Інформаційно-Цифрових Технологій В Умовах Цифрової Ери.Victoria Melnyk - 2019 - Гуманітарний Вісник Запорізької Державної Інженерної Академії 76:200-209.
    The relevance of the research of current problem is that the development of information and digital technologies contributes to digital development of the society, which is based on new wave of technological progress. The purpose of the research is to show how informative revolution of the XX1 century contributes formation of developmental concept of information-digital technologies in the conditions of the electronic era; to identify contradictory phenomena that contribute to the reduction of labor as a result of progressive robotics, (...)
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  35.  82
    Artificial Intelligence, Jobs and the Future of Work: Racing with the Machines.Alban Duka & Edvard P. G. Bruun - 2018 - Basic Income Studies 13 (2).
    Artificial intelligence is rapidly entering our daily lives in the form of driverless cars, automated online assistants and virtual reality experiences. In so doing, AI has already substituted human employment in areas that were previously thought to be uncomputerizable. Based on current trends, the technological displacement of labor is predicted to be significant in the future – if left unchecked this will lead to catastrophic societal unemployment levels. This paper presents a means to mitigate future technological (...) through the introduction of a Basic Income scheme, accompanied by reforms in school curricula and retraining programs. Our proposal argues that such a scheme can be funded by a special tax on those industries that make use of robotic labour; it includes a practical roadmap that would see a government take this proposal from the conceptual phase and implement it nationwide in the span of one decade. (shrink)
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  36.  3
    Концептуализація Інформаційно-Цифрового Менеджменту В Умовах Технологічої Революції 4.0.Victoria Melnyk - 2019 - Гуманітарний Вісник Запорізької Державної Інженерної Академії 77:192-201.
    The relevance of the study of this problem is that the concept of information-digital management contributes to the development of digital society, based on a new wave of technological progress. The purpose of the study is to show how the information revolution of the XXI century contributes to the reduction of manpower as a result of progressive robotization. There are different technologies that are used today to replace people; the need for human resources is reduced thanks to robots, computers (...)
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  37. An Evaluative Conservative Case for Biomedical Enhancement.John Danaher - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9):611-618.
    It is widely believed that a conservative moral outlook is opposed to biomedical forms of human enhancement. In this paper, I argue that this widespread belief is incorrect. Using Cohen’s evaluative conservatism as my starting point, I argue that there are strong conservative reasons to prioritise the development of biomedical enhancements. In particular, I suggest that biomedical enhancement may be essential if we are to maintain our current evaluative equilibrium (i.e. the set of values that undergird and permeate our current (...)
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  38.  83
    Ethical Reflections on Artificial Intelligence.Brian Patrick Green - 2018 - Scientia et Fides 6 (2):9-31.
    Artificial Intelligence technology presents a multitude of ethical concerns, many of which are being actively considered by organizations ranging from small groups in civil society to large corporations and governments. However, it also presents ethical concerns which are not being actively considered. This paper presents a broad overview of twelve topics in ethics in AI, including function, transparency, evil use, good use, bias, unemployment, socio-economic inequality, moral automation and human de-skilling, robot consciousness and rights, dependency, social-psychological effects, and spiritual (...)
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  39.  4
    Master and Slave: the Dialectic of Human-Artificial Intelligence Engagement.Tae Wan Kim, Fabrizio Maimone, Katherina Pattit, Alejo José Sison & Benito Teehankee - 2021 - Humanistic Management Journal 6 (3):355-371.
    The massive introduction of artificial intelligence has triggered significant societal concerns, ranging from “technological unemployment” and the dominance of algorithms in the work place and in everyday life, among others. While AI is made by humans and is, therefore, dependent on the latter for its purpose, the increasing capabilities of AI to carry out productive activities for humans can lead the latter to unwitting slavish existence. This has become evident, for example, in the area of social media use, (...)
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  40.  14
    Ethics and Robotics in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.Bruno Siciliano & Guglielmo Tamburrini - 2019 - Scientia et Fides 22:31-54.
    Ethics and robotics in the fourth industrial revolution The current industrial revolution, characterised by a pervasive spread of technologies and robotic systems, also brings with it an economic, social, cultural and anthropological revolution. Work spaces will be reshaped over time, giving rise to new challenges for human‒machine interaction. Robotics is hereby inserted in a working context in which robotic systems and cooperation with humans call into question the principles of human responsibility, distributive justice and dignity of work. In particular, the (...)
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  41.  69
    Displaced Workers: America's Unpaid Debt.Edmund F. Byrne - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (1):31 - 41.
    The U.S. doctrine of employment-at-will, modified legislatively for protected groups, is being less harshly applied to managerial personnel. Comparable compensation is not otherwise available in the U.S. to workers displaced by technology. Nine pairs of arguments are presented to show how fundamentally management and labor disagree about a company's responsibility for its former employees. These arguments, born of years of labor-management debate, are kaleidoscopic claims about which side has what power. Ultimately, however, not even both together can solve without creative (...)
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  42. Artificial Intelligence and Society: A Furtive Transformation. [REVIEW]Frederick Kile - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (1):107-115.
    During the 1950s, there was a burst of enthusiasm about whether artificial intelligence might surpass human intelligence. Since then, technology has changed society so dramatically that the focus of study has shifted toward society’s ability to adapt to technological change. Technology and rapid communications weaken the capacity of society to integrate into the broader social structure those people who have had little or no access to education. (Most of the recent use of communications by the excluded has been disruptive, (...)
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  43.  12
    Robot: Mere Machine to Transcendent Mind.Hans Moravec - 1998 - Oup Usa.
    Machines will attain human levels of intelligence by the year 2040, predicts robotics expert Hans Moravec. And by 2050, they will have far surpassed us. In this mind-bending new book, Hans Moravec takes the reader on a roller coaster ride packed with such startling predictions. He tells us, for instance, that in the not-too-distant future, an army of robots will displace workers, causing massive, unprecedented unemployment. But then, says Moravec, a period of very comfortable existence will follow, as humans (...)
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  44.  1
    Science for Survival: Scientific Research and the Public Interest.Peter Cotgreave - 2003 - British Library.
    In the modern world, science and technology touch our lives every day, and if they are to serve the public interest it is more important than ever that society discusses the way in which scientific research is performed, funded, organized and reported. Science for Survival provides an accessible and readable examination of the ways in which society interacts with science and the means by which political and other leaders use and misuse science and engineering. Case studies, such as the handling (...)
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  45.  2
    Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises.Anwar Shaikh - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Orthodox economics operates within a hypothesized world of perfect competition in which perfect consumers and firms act to bring about supposedly optimal outcomes. The discrepancies between this model and the reality it claims to address are then attributed to particular imperfections in reality itself. Most heterodox economists seize on this fact and insist that the world is characterized by imperfect competition. But this only ties them to the notion of perfect competition, which remains as their point of departure and base (...)
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  46.  26
    Participation Versus Social Exclusion.Gianluca Grimalda - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 21 (2-3):269 - 279.
    The different experience of unemployment and of poverty in the two main Western economic systems (roughly, Europe and the US) demonstrates that a simple economic approach to these problems does not exist. In this paper I deal with the question of the impact of technological change on productive activities, employment and income distribution.The main idea is the following: technological progress may lead to an impoverishment of the disadvantaged people in a free-market society, as a consequence of their (...)
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  47.  19
    Happiness: A Revolution in Economics.Bruno S. Frey - 2008 - MIT Press.
    Revolutionary developments in economics are rare. The conservative bias of the field and its enshrined knowledge make it difficult to introduce new ideas not in line with received theory. Happiness research, however, has the potential to change economics substantially in the future. Its findings, which are gradually being taken into account in standard economics, can be considered revolutionary in three respects: the measurement of experienced utility using psychologists' tools for measuring subjective well-being; new insights into how human beings value goods (...)
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  48. The Level of Promotion of Entrepreneurship in Technical Colleges in Palestine.Mazen J. Al Shobaki, Samy S. Abu-Naser, Youssef M. Abu Amuna & Suliman A. El Talla - 2018 - International Journal of Engineering and Information Systems (IJEAIS) 2 (1):168-189.
    The study aimed to identify the level of promotion of entrepreneurship in the technical colleges in Palestine. The analytical descriptive method was used in the study. A questionnaire of 41 items was randomly distributed to the technical colleges in the Gaza Strip. The random sample consisted of (275) employees from the mentioned colleges, and the response rate were (74.5%). The results of the study showed that the technical colleges achieved a high level of promotion of entrepreneurship with a relative weight (...)
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  49.  71
    Work.Edmund Byrne - 2015 - In James Britt Holbrook (ed.), Ethics, Science, Technology, and Engineering, Vol. 4, 2nd Ed. Farmington Hills: Gale. pp. 543-549.
    The globalization of and technological challenge to the world's workers generate profound ethical problems. Suitable solutions will require governments and civil societies to move beyond the modern tendencies to divinize property rights and base people's income eligibility almost exclusively on their work. Some attention is being paid to the issues involved therein so as to achieve better work/life balance. In some places, in fact, resource-based wealth has been distributed to all citizens, even to those not directly involved in generating (...)
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  50.  13
    Happiness: A Revolution in Economics.Bruno S. Frey - 2010 - MIT Press.
    Revolutionary developments in economics are rare. The conservative bias of the field and its enshrined knowledge make it difficult to introduce new ideas not in line with received theory. Happiness research, however, has the potential to change economics substantially in the future. Its findings, which are gradually being taken into account in standard economics, can be considered revolutionary in three respects: the measurement of experienced utility using psychologists' tools for measuring subjective well-being; new insights into how human beings value goods (...)
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