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Taryn Knox [4]Taryn Rebecca Knox [2]
  1. Transwomen in elite sport: scientific and ethical considerations.Taryn Knox, Lynley C. Anderson & Alison Heather - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):395-403.
    The inclusion of elite transwomen athletes in sport is controversial. The recent International Olympic Committee guidelines allow transwomen to compete in the women’s division if their testosterone is held below 10 nmol/L. This is significantly higher than that of cis-women. Science demonstrates that high testosterone and other male physiology provides a performance advantage in sport suggesting that transwomen retain some of that advantage. To determine whether the advantage is unfair necessitates an ethical analysis of the principles of inclusion and fairness. (...)
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    Sport-related concussion research agenda beyond medical science: culture, ethics, science, policy.Mike McNamee, Lynley C. Anderson, Pascal Borry, Silvia Camporesi, Wayne Derman, Soren Holm, Taryn Rebecca Knox, Bert Leuridan, Sigmund Loland, Francisco Javier Lopez Frias, Ludovica Lorusso, Dominic Malcolm, David McArdle, Brad Partridge, Thomas Schramme & Mike Weed - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
    The Concussion in Sport Group guidelines have successfully brought the attention of brain injuries to the global medical and sport research communities, and has significantly impacted brain injury-related practices and rules of international sport. Despite being the global repository of state-of-the-art science, diagnostic tools and guides to clinical practice, the ensuing consensus statements remain the object of ethical and sociocultural criticism. The purpose of this paper is to bring to bear a broad range of multidisciplinary challenges to the processes and (...)
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  3.  59
    Sex and gender in sport categorization: aiming for terminological clarity.Irena Martínková, Taryn Knox, Lynley Anderson & Jim Parry - 2022 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 49 (1):134-150.
    It is difficult to develop good arguments when the central terms of the discussion are unclear – as with the current confused state of sex and gender terminology. Sports organisations and sports re...
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  4.  27
    Kid’s Cage-fighting: It Should Be Banned, Right?Taryn Knox & Lynley Anderson - 2021 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 16 (3):300-317.
    Cage-Fighting, also known as Mixed Martial Arts, is a combat sport that allows participants to grapple, punch, kick, elbow and knee—a combination of elements from many martial arts. While it...
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  5.  5
    Concussion management in pediatric patients – ethical concerns.Taryn Knox, Alexander Gilbert & Lynley Anderson - forthcoming - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy:1-15.
    Collision sports pose a high risk of concussion. How to respond to this risk is more ethically complex when considering children and adolescents due to a) incomplete evidence regarding the impact of concussion on developing brains, b) physiological and social vulnerability, and c) the young person’s reliance on proxy decision-makers, usually parents. There is also a lack of clear definitions of (a) collision sport (vs. contact sport) and (b) what constitutes a child or adolescent. We consider whether parents should be (...)
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    On Loland’s conception of fair equality of opportunity in sport.Lynley C. Anderson & Taryn Rebecca Knox - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (9):595-596.
    In his latest paper, Loland1 tackles the question of whether athletes with differences of sexual development may compete in the women’s division. The topic is one of the most complex in sport and, as such, is fraught with debate. On one hand, the higher testosterone levels of athletes with DSD means they have an unfair performance advantage over their female competitors. On the other hand, it is argued that women with DSD should be able to compete in the gender division (...)
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