Results for 'T. M. Crowther'

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  1. Two Conceptions of Conceptualism and Nonconceptualism.T. M. Crowther - 2006 - Erkenntnis 65 (2):245-276.
    Though it enjoys widespread support, the claim that perceptual experiences possess nonconceptual content has been vigorously disputed in the recent literature by those who argue that the content of perceptual experience must be conceptual content. Nonconceptualism and conceptualism are often assumed to be well-defined theoretical approaches that each constitute unitary claims about the contents of experience. In this paper I try to show that this implicit assumption is mistaken, and what consequences this has for the debate about perceptual experience. I (...)
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    I–T. M. Scanlon.T. M. Scanlon - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):301-317.
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  3.  95
    Against Dworkin's Endorsement Constraint: T. M. Wilkinson.T. M. Wilkinson - 2003 - Utilitas 15 (2):175-193.
    Ronald Dworkin argues on the basis of a theory of well-being that critical paternalism is self-defeating. People must endorse their lives if they are to benefit. This is the endorsement constraint and this paper rejects it. For certain kinds of important mistakes that people can make in their lives, the endorsement constraint is either incredible or too narrow to rule out as much paternalism as Dworkin wants. The endorsement constraint cannot be interpreted to give sensible judgements when people change their (...)
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  4. Philosophy, East and West: Essays in Honour of Dr. T. M. P. Mahadevan.T. M. P. Mahadevan & Hywel David Lewis (eds.) - 1976 - Blackie & Son (India).
    Bhattacharyya, K. The Advaita concept of subjectivity.--Deutsch, E. Reflections on some aspects of the theory of rasa.--Nakamura, H. The dawn of modern thought in the East.--Organ, T. Causality, Indian and Greek.--Chatterjee, M. On types of classification.--Lacombe, O. Transcendental imagination.--Bahm, A. J. Standards for comparative philosophy.--Herring, H. Appearance, its significance and meaning in the history of philosophy.--Chang Chung-yuan. Pre-rational harmony in Heidegger's essential thinking and Chʼan thought.--Staal, J. F. Making sense of the Buddhist tetralemma.--Enomiya-Lassalle, H. M. The mysticism of Carl Albrecht (...)
     
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  5. Being Realistic About Reasons.T. M. Scanlon - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    It is often claimed that irreducibly normative truths would have unacceptable metaphysical implications, and are incompatible with a scientific view of the world. The book argues, on the basis of a general account of the relevance of ontological questions, that this claim is mistaken. It is also a mistake to think that interpreting normative judgments as beliefs would make it impossible to explain their connection with action. An agent’s acceptance of a normative judgment can explain that agent’s subsequent action because (...)
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  6.  48
    Ethics and the Acquisition of Organs.T. M. Wilkinson - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Transplantation is a medically successful and cost-effective way to treat people whose organs have failed--but not enough organs are available to meet demand. T. M. Wilkinson explores the major ethical problems raised by policies for acquiring organs. Key topics include the rights of the dead, the role of the family, and the sale of organs.
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  7.  17
    Kathleen M. Crowther, Adam and Eve in the Protestant Reformation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Pp. Xii+293. ISBN 978-0-52119-236-1. £50.00/$85.00. [REVIEW]Charlotte Methuen - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Science 44 (4):582-584.
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    The Difficulty of Tolerance: Essays in Political Philosophy.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    These essays in political philosophy by T. M. Scanlon, written between 1969 and 1999, examine the standards by which social and political institutions should be justified and appraised. Scanlon explains how the powers of just institutions are limited by rights such as freedom of expression, and considers why these limits should be respected even when it seems that better results could be achieved by violating them. Other topics which are explored include voluntariness and consent, freedom of expression, tolerance, punishment, and (...)
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  9.  4
    Kathleen M. Crowther Adam and Eve in the Protestant Reformation , Pp. Xii + 293 Illus, Index, £50.00 $85.00 , ISBN 978 0 521 19236 1. [REVIEW]Joanna Picciotto - 2014 - Early Science and Medicine 19 (4):369-372.
  10.  10
    S + T + M = E as a Convergent Model for the Nature of STEM.Candice M. Quinn, Joshua W. Reid & Grant E. Gardner - 2020 - Science & Education 29 (4):881-898.
  11.  4
    The Difficulty of Tolerance: Essays in Political Philosophy.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - Cambridge University Press.
    These essays in political philosophy by T. M. Scanlon, written between 1969 and 1999, examine the standards by which social and political institutions should be justified and appraised. Scanlon explains how the powers of just institutions are limited by rights such as freedom of expression, and considers why these limits should be respected even when it seems that better results could be achieved by violating them. Other topics which are explored include voluntariness and consent, freedom of expression, tolerance, punishment, and (...)
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  12.  3
    Kathleen M. Crowther. Adam and Eve in the Protestant Reformation. Xii + 293 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. Cambridge/New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010. $85. [REVIEW]Scott Mandelbrote - 2011 - Isis 102 (3):557-558.
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  13. Preference and Urgency.T. M. Scanlon - 1975 - Journal of Philosophy 72 (19):655-669.
  14. The Diversity of Objections to Inequality.T. M. Scanlon - unknown
    This is the text of The Lindley Lecture for 1996, given by T.M. Scanlon, an American philosopher.
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  15.  26
    Counter-Manipulation and Health Promotion.T. M. Wilkinson - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (3):257-266.
    It is generally wrong to manipulate. One leading reason is because manipulation interferes with autonomy, in particular the component of autonomy called ‘independence’, that is, freedom from intentional control by others. Manipulative health promotion would therefore seem wrong. However, manipulative techniques could be used to counter-manipulation, for example, playing on male fears of impotence to counter ‘smoking is sexy’ advertisements. What difference does it make to the ethics of manipulation when it is counter-manipulation? This article distinguishes two powerful defences of (...)
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  16.  32
    Consent and the Use of the Bodies of the Dead.T. M. Wilkinson - 2012 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (5):445-463.
    Gametes, tissue, and organs can be taken from the dying or dead for reproduction, transplantation, and research. Whole bodies as well as parts can be used for teaching anatomy. While these uses are diverse, they have an ethical consideration in common: the claims of the people whose bodies are used. Is some use permissible only when people have consented to the use, actually wanted the use, would have wanted the use, not opposed the use, or what? The aim of this (...)
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  17. Intention and Permissibility, I.T. M. Scanlon - 2000 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 74 (1):301–317.
    [T. M. Scanlon] It is clearly impermissible to kill one person because his organs can be used to save five others who are in need of transplants. It has seemed to many that the explanation for this lies in the fact that in such cases we would be intending the death of the person whom we killed, or failed to save. What makes these actions impermissible, however, is not the agent's intention but rather the fact that the benefit envisaged does (...)
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  18. 3 Rawls on Justification.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - In Samuel Richard Freeman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Rawls. Cambridge University Press. pp. 139.
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  19. Contractualism and Utilitarianism.T. M. Scanlon - 1998 - In James Rachels (ed.), Ethical Theory 2: Theories About How We Should Live. Oxford University Press.
     
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  20.  65
    Individual and Family Decisions About Organ Donation.T. M. Wilkinson - 2007 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (1):26–40.
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  21. Metaphysics and Morals.T. M. Scanlon - 2010 - In Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association. Columbia University Press. pp. 7 - 22.
    This essay argues that normative judgments, in general, and moral judgments, in particular, are "truth apt" and can be objects of belief. Other main claims are: judgments about reasons, if interpreted as true, do not have metaphysical implications that are incompatible with a scientific view of the world. Two kinds of normative claims should be distinguished: substantive claims about what reasons people have and structural claims about what attitudes people must have insofar as they are rational. Employing this distinction, the (...)
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  22.  17
    Intention and Permissibility.T. M. Scanlon & Jonathan Dancy - 2000 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Supplementary Volumes 74:301-338.
    [T. M. Scanlon] It is clearly impermissible to kill one person because his organs can be used to save five others who are in need of transplants. It has seemed to many that the explanation for this lies in the fact that in such cases we would be intending the death of the person whom we killed, or failed to save. What makes these actions impermissible, however, is not the agent's intention but rather the fact that the benefit envisaged does (...)
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  23. The Significance of Choice.T. M. Scanlon - 1988 - In Sterling M. McMurrin (ed.), The Tanner Lectures on Human Values (Vol. 8, pp. 149-216). University of Utah Press.
     
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  24.  78
    Contagious Disease and Self-Defence.T. M. Wilkinson - 2007 - Res Publica 13 (4):339-359.
    This paper gives a self-defence account of the scope and limits of the justified use of compulsion to control contagious disease. It applies an individualistic model of self-defence for state action and uses it to illuminate the constraints on public health compulsion of proportionality and using the least restrictive alternative. It next shows how a self-defence account should not be rejected on the basis of past abuses. The paper then considers two possible limits to a self-defence justification: compulsion of the (...)
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  25.  4
    Index.T. M. Scanlon - 2008 - In Moral Dimensions: Permissibility, Meaning, Blame. Harvard University Press. pp. 243-247.
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  26.  34
    Last Rights: The Ethics of Research on the Dead.T. M. Wilkinson - 2002 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 19 (1):31–41.
  27.  74
    Thinking Harder About Nudges.T. M. Wilkinson - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):486-486.
    According to much modern social psychology, behavioural economics and common sense, people's actions and beliefs are frequently the result of rapid intuitive thought rather than careful deliberation. Richard Thaler and Cass Sunstein, in their influential book, Nudge, synthesised the literature and used it as the basis for numerous policy ideas.1 Not least, they gave the word ‘nudge’ as a handy term to apply to all sorts of ways of taking advantage of people's psychological quirks without coercing or bribing them. But (...)
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  28. The Spin-Echo Experiments and the Second Law of Thermodynamics.T. M. Ridderbos & M. L. G. Redhead - 1998 - Foundations of Physics 28 (8):1237-1270.
    We introduce a simple model for so-called spin-echo experiments. We show that the model is a mincing system. On the basis of this model we study fine-grained entropy and coarse-grained entropy descriptions of these experiments. The coarse-grained description is shown to be unable to provide an explanation of the echo signals, as a result of the way in which it ignores dynamically generated correlations. This conclusion is extended to the general debate on the foundations of statistical mechanics. We emphasize the (...)
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  29.  5
    What Adam Smith Really Thought Should Not Matter.T. M. Wells - forthcoming - Business Ethics Journal Review:40-46.
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  30. The Significance of Choice.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - In Gary Watson (ed.), Free Will. Oxford University Press.
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  31.  35
    Metaphysics and Morals.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 77 (2):7-22.
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  32.  4
    [Book Review] Freedom, Efficiency and Equality. [REVIEW]T. M. Wilkinson - 2002 - Ethics 112 (2):417-420.
  33. Reasons: A Puzzling Duality?T. M. Scanlon - 2004 - In R. Jay Wallace, Philip Pettit, Samuel Scheffler & Michael Smith (eds.), Reason and Value: Themes From the Moral Philosophy of Joseph Raz. Clarendon Press.
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  34. Replies.T. M. Scanlon - 2003 - Ratio 16 (4):424–439.
  35. Rights, Goals, and Fairness.T. M. Scanlon - 1977 - Erkenntnis 11 (1):81 - 95.
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  36.  53
    Racist Organ Donors and Saving Lives.T. M. Wilkinson - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (2):63–74.
  37. PETRY, M. J. .-"Hegel's 'Philosophy of Nature'". [REVIEW]T. M. Knox - 1971 - Philosophy 46:355.
     
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  38.  20
    Research, Informed Consent, and the Limits of Disclosure.T. M. Williamson - 2001 - Bioethics 15 (4):341–363.
  39. Reply to Zofia Stemplowska.T. M. Scanlon - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):508-514.
  40. Jewish Philosophy in the Middle Ages: Science, Rationalism, and Religion.T. M. Rudavsky - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    T. M. Rudavsky tells the story of the development of Jewish philosophy from the 10th century to Spinoza in the 17th, as part of a dialogue with medieval Christian and Islamic thought. She gives a broad historical survey of major figures and schools within the medieval Jewish tradition, focusing on the tensions between Judaism and rational thought.
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  41.  23
    Historical Inevitability.T. M. Knox - 1955 - Philosophical Quarterly 5 (19):189-189.
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  42.  48
    Daniel Sperling, Posthumous Interests: Legal and Ethical Perspectives. [REVIEW]T. M. Wilkinson - 2009 - Journal of Value Inquiry 43 (4):531-535.
  43.  59
    The Confiscation and Sale of Organs.T. M. Wilkinson - 2007 - Res Publica 13 (3):327-337.
  44.  44
    Well-Being: Its Meaning, Measurement and Moral Importance.T. M. Scanlon - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):312.
  45. The Unity of the Normative. [REVIEW]T. M. Scanlon - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 154 (3):443-450.
    From the issue entitled "With Book Symposium on Judith Thomson's Normativity".
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  46. Reasons, Responsibility, and Reliance: Replies to Wallace, Dworkin, and Deigh.T. M. Scanlon - 2002 - Ethics 112 (3):507-528.
  47. Wrongness and Reasons: A Re-Examination.T. M. Scanlon - 2007 - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics. Clarendon Press.
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  48.  53
    Community, Public Health and Resource Allocation.T. M. Wilkinson - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (3):267-271.
    If ‘community’ is the answer, what is the problem? While questions undoubtedly arise in allocating resources to public health, such as ‘how much?’ and ‘to whom?’, we already have answers based on (i) the observation that disease and illness are bad, (ii) views of justice and fairness and (iii) an appreciation of market failure. What does the concept of community add to the existing answers? Not nothing, I shall argue, but not much either. In some cases, health providers should take (...)
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  49. Reply to Leif Wenar.T. M. Scanlon - 2013 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):400-405.
  50.  62
    Parental Consent and the Use of Dead Children's Bodies.T. M. Wilkinson - 2001 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (4):337-358.
    : It has recently become known that, in Liverpool and elsewhere, parts of children's bodies were taken postmortem and used for research without the parents being told. But should parental consent be sought before using children's corpses for medical purposes? This paper presents the view that parental consent is overrated. Arguments are rejected for consent from dead children's interests, property rights, family autonomy, and religious freedom. The only direct reason to get parental consent is to avoid distressing the parents, which (...)
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