86 found
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  1.  32
    Kant and the Claims of Knowledge.T. H. Irwin - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (2):332.
  2. Aristotle, Nicomachean Ethics (367-323 BC).T. H. Irwin - 1999 - In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Blackwell. pp. 56.
  3. Aristotle on reason, desire, and virtue.T. H. Irwin - 1975 - Journal of Philosophy 72 (17):567-578.
  4. Plato's heracleiteanism.T. H. Irwin - 1977 - Philosophical Quarterly 27 (106):1-13.
  5. Who discovered the will?T. H. Irwin - 1992 - Philosophical Perspectives 6:453-473.
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  6. Aristippus Against Happiness.T. H. Irwin - 1991 - The Monist 74 (1):55-82.
    Many Greek moralists are eudaemonists; they assume that happiness is the ultimate end of rational human action. Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and most of their successors treat this assumption as the basis of their ethical argument. But not all Greek moralists agree; and since the eudaemonist assumption may not seem as obviously correct to us as it seems to many Greek moralists, it is worth considering the views of those Greeks who dissent from it.
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  7.  46
    II—Nil Admirari? Uses and Abuses of Admiration.T. H. Irwin - 2015 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 89 (1):223-248.
    Both Plato and Aristotle have something to say about admiration. But in order to know where to look, and in order to appreciate the force of their remarks, we need to sketch a little of the ethical background that they presuppose. I begin, therefore, with ancient Greek ethics in the wider sense, and discuss the treatment of admiration and related attitudes by Homer, Herodotus, and other pre-Platonic sources. Then I turn to the views of Plato, Adam Smith, Aristotle and Cicero. (...)
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  8.  59
    Aristotle’s Discovery of Metaphysics.T. H. Irwin - 1977 - Review of Metaphysics 31 (2):210 - 229.
    Why should Aristotle reject his own criteria for a science to admit this puzzling science of being? Or does he really reject them? Perhaps the science of being is not intended to be a universal science of the type rejected elsewhere. The Metaphysics and the Organon are not concerned with exactly the same questions; and verbal differences may not reflect real or important doctrinal conflicts.
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  9.  4
    8. Reason and Responsibility in Aristotle.T. H. Irwin - 1980 - In Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle’s Ethics. University of California Press. pp. 117-156.
  10.  23
    Aristotle's Philosophy of Action.T. H. Irwin - 1986 - Phronesis 31 (1):68-89.
  11. First principles in Aristotle's ethics.T. H. Irwin - 1978 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 3 (1):252-272.
  12. The Structure of Aristotelian Happiness:Aristotle on the Human Good. Richard Kraut.T. H. Irwin - 1991 - Ethics 101 (2):382-.
  13.  17
    Brill Online Books and Journals.Gail Fine, Francisco J. Gonzalez, Verity Harte, Tim O'Keefe, Tad Brennan, T. H. Irwin & Bob Sharples - 1996 - Phronesis 41 (3):245-275.
  14. The theory of forms.T. H. Irwin - 2001 - Filozofski Vestnik 22 (1):55-81.
     
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  15.  57
    Prudence and morality in greek ethics.T. H. Irwin - 1995 - Ethics 105 (2):284-295.
    Focuses on the traditional view of Greek ethics. Response to articles by Julia Annas and Nicholas White about the interpretation of Greek ethics; Plato's concept of happiness based on his book `Republic'; Issues about prudential and moral reasoning.
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  16. Socratic Puzzles: A Review of Gregory Vlastos, Socrates: Ironist and Moral Philosopher.T. H. Irwin - 1992 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 10:241-66.
     
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  17.  4
    3. The Metaphysical and Psychological Basis of Aristotle's Ethics.T. H. Irwin - 1980 - In Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle’s Ethics. University of California Press. pp. 35-54.
  18.  27
    Socratic Inquiry and Politics:Socrates and the State. Richard Kraut; Times Literary Supplement. Gregory Vlastos.T. H. Irwin - 1986 - Ethics 96 (2):400-.
  19.  13
    Moral Philosophy or Unphilosophic Morals?: A Critical Notice of Early Greek Ethics, edited by David Conan Wolfsdorf.T. H. Irwin - 2024 - Mind 133 (529):226-241.
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  20.  26
    The Platonic Corpus.T. H. Irwin - 2008 - In Gail Fine (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Plato. Oxford University Press. pp. 63--87.
    This article attempts to answer certain questions that arise regarding the dialogues as penned by Plato centuries ago. The speaker or the narrator of the text happens to be Socrates, who through various conversations with his apprentices unravels the nuances of the various philosophical dialogues.
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  21. Practical Reason Divided.T. H. Irwin - 1997 - In Garrett Cullity & Berys Nigel Gaut (eds.), Ethics and Practical Reason. Oxford University Press. pp. 189--214.
     
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  22. Plato: the intellectual background.T. H. Irwin - 1992 - In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato. Cambridge University Press. pp. 51--89.
  23.  13
    Some Rational Aspects of Incontinence.T. H. Irwin - 1988 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 27 (S1):49-88.
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  24.  40
    Ways to First Principles.T. H. Irwin - 1987 - Philosophical Topics 15 (2):109-134.
  25.  7
    Ways to First Principles.T. H. Irwin - 1987 - Philosophical Topics 15 (2):109-134.
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  26.  60
    Splendid Vices? Augustine For and Against Pagan Virtues.T. H. Irwin - 1999 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 8 (2):105-127.
    Augustine is notorious for his claim that the so-called virtues of pagans are not genuine virtues at all. Bayle refers to this claim when he describes the sort of virtue that one ought to be willing to attribute to atheists.
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  27.  25
    Aquinas, natural law, and aristotelian eudaimonism.T. H. Irwin - 2006 - In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 323--341.
    The prelims comprise: I II III IV V VI VII VIII IX Notes Reference Further reading.
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  28. Do Virtues Conflict? Aquinas's Answer.T. H. Irwin - 2005 - In Stephen Mark Gardiner (ed.), Virtue Ethics, Old and New. Cornell University Press.
     
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  29. Mill and the classical world.T. H. Irwin - 1998 - In John Skorupski (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Mill. Cambridge University Press. pp. 423--463.
     
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  30.  53
    Say What You Believe.T. H. Irwin - 1993 - Apeiron 26 (3/4):1 - 16.
  31.  47
    Tradition and Reason in the History of Ethics: T. H. IRWIN.T. H. Irwin - 1989 - Social Philosophy and Policy 7 (1):45-68.
    Students of the history of ethics sometimes find themselves tempted by moderate or extreme versions of an approach that might roughly be called ‘historicist’. This temptation may result from the difficulties of approaching historical texts from a ‘narrowly philosophical’ point of view. We may begin, for instance, by wanting to know what Aristotle has to say about ‘the problems of ethics’, so that we can compare his views with those of Aquinas, Hume, Kant, Sidgwick, and Rawls, and then decide what (...)
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  32.  40
    The Scope of Deliberation: A Conflict in Aquinas.T. H. Irwin - 1990 - Review of Metaphysics 44 (1):21 - 42.
    IT HAS OFTEN BEEN SUPPOSED that Aristotle's account of thought and action imposes severe limits on the functions and scope of practical reason; and insofar as Thomas Aquinas accepts Aristotle's account, he seems to be forced into the same restrictive view of practical reason. Practical reason expresses itself primarily in deliberation ; and the virtue that uses practical reason correctly is the deliberative virtue of prudence. Aristotle believes that deliberation is confined to means to ends, while will is focused on (...)
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  33.  57
    Virtue, Praise and Success.T. H. Irwin - 1990 - The Monist 73 (1):59-79.
    Ancient critics often argue that the Stoic moralists really have no substantive disagreement with Aristotle, but simply say the same things in more violently paradoxical terms. One of the Stoics’ most acute critics, the sceptic Carneades, claims that on the whole question about goods and evils, the Stoics and Peripatetics differ about terms, not about the facts. On this view, the apparently extravagant Stoic claims about virtue, happiness, good, and evil, really agree with Aristotle. As Cicero says, when we take (...)
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  34. Stoic individuals.T. H. Irwin - 1996 - Philosophical Perspectives 10:459 - 480.
  35.  50
    Shaftesbury’s place in the history of moral realism.T. H. Irwin - 2015 - Philosophical Studies 172 (4):865-882.
    Whewell and ShaftesburyIn contemporary moral philosophy ‘moral realism’ refers to a position in the metaphysics of morality that is analogous to realism about ordinary objects, and to scientific realism about theoretical entities. It is a realist doctrine in contrast to non-cognitivism, constructivism, fictionalism, and nihilism about moral judgments and moral properties. But while these particular contrasts are characteristic of contemporary philosophy, realism itself is much older. Ross, Prichard, and Sidgwick, for instance, hold realist views in the metaphysics of morals, though (...)
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  36.  83
    Some rational aspects of incontinence.T. H. Irwin - 1989 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 27 (S1):49-88.
  37. The Theory of Forms.T. H. Irwin - 1999 - In Gail Fine (ed.), Plato 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
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  38. Later Christian ethics.T. H. Irwin - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press.
     
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  39.  19
    Nature, law, and natural law.T. H. Irwin - 2013 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 206.
    This chapter analyses various theories of natural law. The discussions cover meta-ethical objections to natural law theory; the views of Mills and Hobbes; a holistic and teleological conception of nature; nature and the precepts of natural law; nature and human good; natural sociality and morality; a defence of naturalism; a voluntarist conception of natural law; an objection to and defence of voluntarism; and natural morality without natural law.
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  40. Julia Annas, An Introduction to Plato's Republic Reviewed by.T. H. Irwin - 1982 - Philosophy in Review 2 (2/3):49-54.
     
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  41.  78
    Generosity and Property in Aristotle's Politics: T. H. IRWIN.T. H. Irwin - 1987 - Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (2):37-54.
    Etymology might encourage us to begin a discussion of Aristotle on philanthropy with a discussion of philanthropia ; and it is instructive to see why this is not quite the right place to look. The Greek term initially refers to a generalized attitude of kindness and consideration for a human being. The gods accuse Prometheus of being a ‘human-lover’, intending the term in an unfavorable sense, when he confers on human beings the benefits that should have been confined to the (...)
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  42.  5
    A Companion to Plato’s Republic.T. H. Irwin & Nicholas P. White - 1980 - Philosophical Review 89 (4):640.
  43.  80
    A 'fundamental misunderstanding'?T. H. Irwin - 2007 - Utilitas 19 (1):78-90.
    One of the many illuminating aspects of Bart Schultz's book is the recurrent theme of Sidgwick's Socratic inspiration. Some of Sidgwick's contemporaries at Cambridge were among those who gave new life to the study of Socrates and Plato in England. The Cambridge Apostles were self-consciously devoted both to Socratic ideals of friendship and to the Socratic aim of impartial free inquiry on fundamental questions.
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  44.  23
    Aristotle on Meaning and Essence.T. H. Irwin - 2004 - International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):95-105.
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  45. Aristotelian substances and stoic subjects.T. H. Irwin - 1997 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 51 (201):397-415.
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  46.  9
    Aristotle's Use of Prudential Concepts.T. H. Irwin - 2006 - In Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Mcdowell and His Critics. Blackwell. pp. 6--180.
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  47. Ancient Views. The virtues: theory and common sense in Greek philosophy.T. H. Irwin - 1998 - In Roger Crisp (ed.), How Should One Live?: Essays on the Virtues. Clarendon Press.
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  48. Bernard Williams, Shame and Necessity. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1993. Pp. xii+ 254.T. H. Irwin - 1994 - Apeiron 27 (1):45-76.
  49. ch. 2. Historical accuracy in Aquinas's commentary on the "Ethics".T. H. Irwin - 2013 - In Tobias Hoffmann, Jörn Müller & Matthias Perkams (eds.), Aquinas and the Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  50.  51
    Continuity in the History of Autonomy.T. H. Irwin - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (5):442 - 459.
    Abstract Six apparent features of Kant's conception of autonomy appear to differentiate it sharply from anything that we can find in an Aristotelian conception of will and practical reason. (1) Autonomy requires a role for practical reason independent of its instrumental role in relation to non-rational desires. (2) This role belongs to the rational will. (3) This role consists in the rational will's being guided by its own law. (4) This guidance by the law of the will itself requires acts (...)
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