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Szu-Yen Lin
Soochow University (Taiwan)
  1. Beardsley on Literature, Fiction, and Nonfiction.Szu-Yen Lin - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Culture 8 (1).
    This paper attempts to revive interest in the speech act theory of literature by looking into Monroe C. Beardsley's account in particular. Beardsley's view in this respect has received, surprisingly, less attention than deserved. I first offer a reconstruction of Beardsley's account and then use it to correct some notable misconceptions. Next, I show that the reformulation reveals a hitherto unnoticed discrepancy in Beardsley's position and that this can be explained away by a weak version of intentionalism that Beardsley himself (...)
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  2. Beardsley and the Implied Author.Szu-Yen Lin - 2018 - Journal of Literary Theory 12 (1):171–192.
    Some theorists on literary interpretation have suggested a connection between Monroe C. Beardsley’s anti-intentionalism and hypothetical intentionalism based on an implied author. However, a full exploration has never been attempted. I undertake this task in this paper. A close reading of Beardsley reveals that he assumes something very similar to the implied author in interpretation. I distinguish five types of fictional works in terms of their narrative mode and show that my claim stands in at least four of the five (...)
     
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    A Dilemma for Modest Actual Intentionalism.Szu-Yen Lin - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics 60 (2):165-181.
    Modest actual intentionalism is a major position on interpretation in contemporary analytic aesthetics. The position consists of a disjunctive formulation according to which work-meaning is determined by the author’s intention when such intention succeeds or by non-intentionalistic factors when it fails. I challenge the disjunctive view by presenting a constructive dilemma, the conclusion being that modest actual intentionalism ends up either making non-intentionalistic factors idle or making authorial intent superfluous.
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  4. Art and Interpretation.Szu-Yen Lin - 2018 - The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Interpretation in art refers to the attribution of meaning to a work. A point on which people often disagree is whether the artist’s or author’s intention is relevant to the interpretation of the work. In the Anglo-American analytic philosophy of art, views about interpretation branch into two major camps: intentionalism and anti-intentionalism, with an initial focus on one art, namely literature. -/- This article elaborates on variations on these theories of interpretation and considers their notable objections. The debate about interpretation (...)
     
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  5. Interpretation and the Implied Author: A Descriptive Project.Szu-Yen Lin - 2018 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 56 (1):83-100.
    The utterance model is a popular basis for theories of interpretation in the contemporary analytic philosophy of literature. This model suggests that interpretation should be constrained by a work's identity‐relevant factors in its context of production because a work, like an utterance, acquires its identity and content in part from its relations with that context. From a descriptive point of view, I argue that the implied author account of interpretation best describes critical practice following the current positions based on the (...)
     
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    Beardsley's Contextualism: Philosophical and Educational Significance.Szu-Yen Lin - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 53 (1):43.
    Monroe C. Beardsley has been interpreted by many theorists as advocating antiexternalism with respect to an artwork's aesthetically relevant properties, typically its meaning. According to this orthodox interpretation, the meaning of a work is not established by external or contextual factors but by what is internally present in the work. This acontextual account of meaning is challenged by contextualism, which claims that a work's identity and meaning are in part determined by contextual factors. However, a close look at textual evidence (...)
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